Is This Job Legit?

Topic 31630 | Page 1

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Peter Nyiri's Comment
member avatar

I found the following job offer, I want to know your take on it. Is it legit? If not, how would they scam me?

The red flags I see are 1. Too little experience required 2. For a high pay

Dry Van CDL Class A OTR FOR DEPT OF DEFENSE TRAINING to $3500 a week

Based on 70 hours 34-hour reset

Home every 10-12 days!!!

FREE TRAINING!!! START OUT at $3000 a week on dry van team while in training. Get certified DOD from us in 90 DAYS and get up to $2400 to $3500 a week on a govt dedicated route

1099 paid weekly

Home every 10-12 days to start then more flexible home time when on DOD

Must have at least 6 months OTR experience on dry van free training on rest.

Good driving record

Full training on Refrigerator, hazmat , and govt DOD clearance in 90 days. Drive team while you get certified.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Banks's Comment
member avatar

If you have to ask, you know the answer.

Matthew P.'s Comment
member avatar

The 1099 tells some of the story. You're on the hook for more taxes and have zero in the way of benefits. Benefits are about 25 percent of your annual pay give or take. So it "kinda" makes sense but I still am calling bulls^&t on that one.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

IMO any company that pays on a 1099 is a high probability of being shady in one or another. By the time you take into account taxes and insurance like Matt said you'll be close if not below a w2 driver pay wise. Plus from what I've seen these 1099 companies do some funny stuff when it comes to logging and their insurance.

One other thing "upto 2400 to 3500" which is it 2400 or 3500?

IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

The 1099 makes you a lease operator, NOT a company driver...regardless of what they tell you. In fact it sounds similar to what Andrey was doing and we were waiting to hear about his taxes but haven't heard from him for a while. As a 1099 driver, you are responsible for both employee and employer payments for social security. Plus your taxes need to be paid quarterly to the IRS.

If it were me, I would be walking away.

Laura

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

RUN!

Peter Nyiri's Comment
member avatar

Good point on the 1099 and the benefits. I totally missed that aspect.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hey Peter, welcome to our forum!

I am assuming you are not a driver just yet, or are very new to this. If that's the case I urge you to find your way into this career through the most effective and least expensive means. Here's where you can find some of the most legitimate trucking companies who train newbies through their Paid CDL Training Programs.

We are here to help you understand this career. One thing you have to realize is that there are no "secret" companies out here paying astronomical incomes to their drivers. The pay is pretty much competitive across the board. The secret to making great money as a trucker is to be a great trucker. This is an extraordinary job requiring extraordinary people.

Everything about a trucker's income is based on his performance. Average truck driver pay is around fifty or sixty thousand per year. There are plenty of drivers here in this community who earn upwards of 100,000 dollars per year. They are above average. They outperform the average drivers. That's the key to success in trucking. You have to understand the career and put forth the effort to reach your goals. The name on your truck's doors cannot do that for you.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Peter Nyiri's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the kind words. I got my CDL applying through this website and I am 6 months into the job. I am earning 45 cents per mile, 2 weeks away from paying back my training costs and about to do a transfer inside the company that will earn me 90 cents.

I really can't complain about how it's been going so far, my only problem is that the Dallas terminal is 350 miles from the city where my family lives and I was looking for a better setup. I am trying to wade through the BS that I come across. Not sure if you already have an article on that subject but it would be worth.

Hey Peter, welcome to our forum!

I am assuming you are not a driver just yet, or are very new to this. If that's the case I urge you to find your way into this career through the most effective and least expensive means. Here's where you can find some of the most legitimate trucking companies who train newbies through their Paid CDL Training Programs.

We are here to help you understand this career. One thing you have to realize is that there are no "secret" companies out here paying astronomical incomes to their drivers. The pay is pretty much competitive across the board. The secret to making great money as a trucker is to be a great trucker. This is an extraordinary job requiring extraordinary people.

Everything about a trucker's income is based on his performance. Average truck driver pay is around fifty or sixty thousand per year. There are plenty of drivers here in this community who earn upwards of 100,000 dollars per year. They are above average. They outperform the average drivers. That's the key to success in trucking. You have to understand the career and put forth the effort to reach your goals. The name on your truck's doors cannot do that for you.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the kind words. I got my CDL applying through this website and I am 6 months into the job. I am earning 45 cents per mile, 2 weeks away from paying back my training costs and about to do a transfer inside the company that will earn me 90 cents.

I really can't complain about how it's been going so far, my only problem is that the Dallas terminal is 350 miles from the city where my family lives and I was looking for a better setup. I am trying to wade through the BS that I come across. Not sure if you already have an article on that subject but it would be worth.

double-quotes-start.png

Hey Peter, welcome to our forum!

I am assuming you are not a driver just yet, or are very new to this. If that's the case I urge you to find your way into this career through the most effective and least expensive means. Here's where you can find some of the most legitimate trucking companies who train newbies through their Paid CDL Training Programs.

We are here to help you understand this career. One thing you have to realize is that there are no "secret" companies out here paying astronomical incomes to their drivers. The pay is pretty much competitive across the board. The secret to making great money as a trucker is to be a great trucker. This is an extraordinary job requiring extraordinary people.

Everything about a trucker's income is based on his performance. Average truck driver pay is around fifty or sixty thousand per year. There are plenty of drivers here in this community who earn upwards of 100,000 dollars per year. They are above average. They outperform the average drivers. That's the key to success in trucking. You have to understand the career and put forth the effort to reach your goals. The name on your truck's doors cannot do that for you.

double-quotes-end.png

Howdy, Peter!

Welcome from me, as well. I'm not real sure about WHAT subject you'd like an article on, as you weren't very clear; yet I'm pretty sure we WOULD have one. :)

Could you clarify?

Thanks, and also . . . welcome to TT !

~ Anne ~

ps: Jumping from .45 to .90 ??? CPM? Odd, but .. why leave? Let us know!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

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