What Was Your First CDL Job?

Topic 31657 | Page 1

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Trenton H.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey everyone. Trying to get some insight and was wondering what your very first CDL job was and how did you land that job? Did you enjoy it and how many hours did they having you working a week?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Travis's Comment
member avatar

Closest I've had was "CDL equivalent" I guess as a 92F Petroleum Supply specialist learning to drive fuel trucks in the Army.

As far as how? Wanted a sweet $20k bonus for it and signed up. Got to Iraq and contractors were doing all the fuel work 🤣

Still got the $20k though.

Hey everyone. Trying to get some insight and was wondering what your very first CDL job was and how did you land that job? Did you enjoy it and how many hours did they having you working a week?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

I was working at Sysco in the warehouse and was going to get my CDL through them. Instead I felt like I was getting jerked around and seen on indeed.com that PFG was hiring a driver apprentice. I was used to the physical side so it wasn't too terrible. At first I liked it but began getting burned out and found a much easier job making more money. At times I miss it just for the exercise i got. I've put on some weight over the last 3 years since I quit and it's more difficult getting it off now. They put me through cdl school about 180 miles from my home and put me up in a hotel. Average week was about 60 hours. 60 hours of unloading a 28' trailer by hand with a 2 wheel dolly. I'd highly recommend getting your start OTR or if you can get on with an LTL carrier getting on preferably linehaul.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

I did regional with West Side transport for 2 months then was able to get hired at Old Dominion for a linehaul job. Pay is better and I'm home every night.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
James H.'s Comment
member avatar

Local LTL linehaul , 5 nights a week, ~12 hours a night. Found the job on indeed. My home terminal was 10 minutes from my house, which was a major consideration. Shifts were long enough without adding significant commuting time.

I actually found the dock work - loading and unloading trailers via forklift on a very crowded, busy dock, trying to safely unload freight that hadn't been properly secured and had shifted during transit, etc. - to be a lot more challenging than the truck driving. Pups are typically loaded for linehaul using racks, so there are two levels of freight (picture below).

I enjoyed the work, felt very well supported by the company and my coworkers.

0989689001648556960.jpg

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Anne A. (Momma Anne) & To's Comment
member avatar

Local LTL linehaul , 5 nights a week, ~12 hours a night. Found the job on indeed. My home terminal was 10 minutes from my house, which was a major consideration. Shifts were long enough without adding significant commuting time.

I actually found the dock work - loading and unloading trailers via forklift on a very crowded, busy dock, trying to safely unload freight that hadn't been properly secured and had shifted during transit, etc. - to be a lot more challenging than the truck driving. Pups are typically loaded for linehaul using racks, so there are two levels of freight (picture below).

I enjoyed the work, felt very well supported by the company and my coworkers.

0989689001648556960.jpg

Bump!

I've gotta say, good picture of ya, James. I'm not sure why this thread didn't go forward. I'm hoping others will contribute!!!

My guy, Tom's, was hauling trash/refuse in a Vactor/rolloff, CDLB. He started his own business, late '80s, early '90s, side job along side Lucent Tech, Cisco, and ICG. All those certificates,worthless on the wall now! LoL....

His brother drove for Kokosing, but mostly local, and asphalt paving within Ohio. Great retirement, now.

Tom got his CDL in 2003, and drove for USX, then Transport America. Had to get legal! FX/LH, then Saunders/Shelly/Asphalt, now FAB!

Anyway, good thread!

~ Anne ~

ps: I still don't have a CDL..permitted 2x and didn't go forward, re: kids. Prior, in the late 80's early 90's, I pulled a 5th wheel 32' trailer behind a Chevy 3/4 ton, 3 on the tree... full of boat propellers, underwater shafting, etc... all under (or so they said?) 26K!!

NEXT ?!?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

Im still at my first job. Regional-ish/OTR-ish, Dry van for Knight. I got my CDL from them. I love it. Have my grumbles with the company, but Im pretty sure its just normal stuff for the industry. Been here a year.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Chris W.'s Comment
member avatar

my first job was working at a private company. We only had one semi truck a Mack Granite and 2 Kenworth dump truck. I only drove the Mack Granite and we used it like once or twice a week about 4 hours each so roughly 8 hours a week. Luckily I got paid a guarantee salary of 40k a year.i worked there for more experience then got a job with UPS they gave me a sleeper. Mack anthem and because I am a person who prefers afternoon or late night pickups and dropoffs they were willing to work with me. I love UPS and recommended them. My first job actually went out of business unfortunately.

Hey everyone. Trying to get some insight and was wondering what your very first CDL job was and how did you land that job? Did you enjoy it and how many hours did they having you working a week?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Brandon S.'s Comment
member avatar

My first cdl job right out of school was driving flatbed otr for overnight transportation. Mostly home on the weekends, it was a pretty good job.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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