Clock Management

Topic 31673 | Page 1

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Bruce K.'s Comment
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Today I learned a lesson on clock management that I hope to remember for future use.

I had a 700 mile assignment. Live load, live unload. So the first day I drove 450 miles after a long live load. Parked at a rest area and went into sleeper berth. This was at 8:00 pm. So I actually used 11 hours on sleeper berth. My appointment at a Walmart DC was at 6:16 pm. So I get back on the road at 7:00 am. This starts the dreaded 14 hour clock. I get to my delivery at 11:30 am. For those of you who are not familiar with Walmart DC rules, they will not take you more than one hour early. So I had to sit from 11:30 to 6:16 with the 14 hour clock running. Walmart doesn’t get me unloaded until 9:06. So my 14 hour clock had expired by then. I had to use personal conveyance time to get to a parking spot.

Now here’s the brain teaser: What should I have done differently to avoided this problem? Winner, winner, chicken dinner!

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PJ's Comment
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If I’m reading this right, had you done your ten and hit the road, would have given you 7 hrs of sitting time, then you would have gotten time back with a 7/3 split to get you out of there.

Mountain Matt's Comment
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Even if you had taken the 2 hour portion of an 8/2 split or the 3 hour portion of a 7/3 split, it would've extended your 14 hour clock enough to get you out of there.

Alternately, you could've left the rest area later so as to start your clock later. Sometimes it's good to get on the road to make sure you get the miles covered (weather, traffic), but that has to be balanced against starting your 14 hour clock.

These are things I'm very actively learning, with my grand week and a half experience! Lol

Davy A.'s Comment
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You, from the look of it had done a full 10 the night before. So it's a new day, new shift. I'd have hit split berth when I pulled in at 11:30. After the first 2/3 , your 14 hour clock would have been back to where it was when you pulled in to the DC.

The thing to remember is that when you stop again, in order for it to be valid, you must do the remaining 8/7. I routinely use the first part of split berth and then just shut down for the night as once you get a full 10, you get fresh clocks anyway.

But in terms of trip planning. I would have figured out how long to the receiver on day two, added a 2 hour buffer and waited to start day 2 so that I arrive an hour or so before my appointment. Probably about a third of my stuff is live, and I do that frequently for having to deal with 6 am appointments, I'll put them towards the the end of my driving shift yet sti give enough to get shut down somewhere after. I hate waking up early.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

You guys are way ahead of me with the split sleeper berth timing. I still need to figure that out. But Mt. Matt was thinking what I’m thinking: I got started too early. When I was on sleeper berth at the rest area, I should have done my waiting there and then my 14 hour clock wouldn’t have started. As it happened, I did my waiting while the 14 hour clock ran down. Big mistake. And as Davy pointed out, I should have taken in to consideration the relationship between my 14 hour clock time and my appointment time. Next time I’ll do better trip planning. That 14 hour clock is so critical.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Klutch's Comment
member avatar

We are not allowed to split our sleeper at Schneider but yes the obvious answer is you should not have started your 14 and instead pushed back your start time.

What I would have done or normally do is recognized this would be an issue when doing my trip plan and immediately contact my DBL. I have never had to sit like that because they either have me take it to one of our drop lots or they are able to get an earlier appointment time but that’s with me calling in before even accepting the assignment. Communication at least at my company can alleviate these problems all together.

You should have been aware of this issue right off when figuring out your eta/nat.

Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

And if your system has the option box for split SB, check the box lol After midnight, you get the hours back from your 8th day. Theoretically, max drive time 9.5 hours, shut down for 10+ a lil bit, Keeps ya running on recaps. I didn't do that much, because I was trying to maximize my miles per day. But then again, 95% of my loads were not on time restraints. It was "get it there, when you can, safely". And most of em were 1,400-1,500 mile drop& hook runs from Calif to Muldrow or Jenks, OK, and back, or Houston, DFW, etc...Hated L.L. / L.Unloads, but the last 2-3 of those, were pretty fast getting me in & out

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

We are not allowed to split our sleeper at Schneider but yes the obvious answer is you should not have started your 14 and instead pushed back your start time.

What I would have done or normally do is recognized this would be an issue when doing my trip plan and immediately contact my DBL. I have never had to sit like that because they either have me take it to one of our drop lots or they are able to get an earlier appointment time but that’s with me calling in before even accepting the assignment. Communication at least at my company can alleviate these problems all together.

You should have been aware of this issue right off when figuring out your eta/nat.

Well, Klutch, we all make mistakes. The important thing is to learn from them.

Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

Clock mngments easy now lol I go to sleep when ever, wake up usually early, mid day, depending what I was doing etc. I take a nanny nap sometimes @ 2 pm or later wake up around 6pm ....

But damn working on all these dang cars past 2 weeks . Buddies Honda, I fought the crank bolt removal, it aint budging fer diddly (never been off) trying to do the water pump & timing belt ( another 1st on this type car for me) they used a hella lot of loctite at assembly... hahaha, back at it tomorrow....A lift would be nice for this job, not the concrete garage floor lol gettin' too old for this floor work.

Ran to Vegas, Sunday, to replace their daughter's Camry exh-mani-cat. converter, burnt up my 14 hour clock, including 2 drive cycles hahaha If I could sell my eh $50k+ tools for $10k, I wouldn't be workin' as hard "retired" LOL

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

If I’m reading this right, had you done your ten and hit the road, would have given you 7 hrs of sitting time, then you would have gotten time back with a 7/3 split to get you out of there.

Was MY first thought too, Peej !

All the posters in and among and after; all sage and wise. I'm reciting this in my lil' head, getting ready for MY time to shine, ya know?

Just wanted to tell you, it's a treat to see you post every now & again!!!!

You're missed, man. Colleen, too!!

~ Anne & Tom ~

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