Tips For Better Fuel Efficiency?

Topic 31701 | Page 2

Page 2 of 4 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

My friend from Amity Island is correct. Prime pays fuel bonus based on cost per mile.

As Chief also mentioned, BK, hitting the "gas" as the truck begins to coast at the top of hills pretty much becomes a Pavlovian response as soon as you hear/feel the RPMs drop. While driving at night or with very light traffic I'd let it do it's thing. But in moderate traffic I'd hit the pedal immediately so as not to inconvenience the vehicle behind me. When driving reefer while teaming with a student making the best available time was not a priority. Someone always had the hours to keep moving. Getting a $150 fuel bonus each week made it worthwhile to try and minimize fuel costs😉

Different trucks might utilize cruise control more efficiently, PackRat. At Prime orientation, it was a point of emphasis in reference to Freightliners to make sure we used cruise control as much as possible to SAVE FUEL🤷

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

At knight our fuel bonus is based on miles on route divided by gallons consumed and compliance with our scheduled fuel stops. So I don't care either. Our trucks seldom idle because of control settings unless you choose to tape a hand warmer over the temp sensor on the bottom of the mirror and cover it with a beanie.

Since we're governed at 63 on the pedal, 65 on cruise with a plus 2 on the pass smart, it's necessary to use cruise almost all the time. If the pedal is pushed all the way to the floor it will bypass the collision avoidance. We have auto coast on the pedal and CC all the time. It's an annoyance most of the time although I use it. My goal is maximum speed as well when it's safe to do so. 71 is our max before we will get hit on our smart drive score. I keep it at 70 as long and as much as possible using hills and manipulation of the controls and pass smart. Again, only when safe to do so.

Basically due to the limitations placed on our trucks by programming, I drive by buttons on the wheel using it like a quarter turn throttle. I leave the Jake on, as soon as CC is cancelled the Jake deploys. Hit resume and it accelerates. I use manual mode to keep it from auto coasting on mild grades where it will coast down to 63 before engaging throttle.

Gives me something to do on long straight sections of interstate. Adverse conditions and city traffic I don't use CC as well as curvy and mountains.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

BK's Comment
member avatar

When I drove for Schneider, using cruise control was a big deal. At my new company it is also, but not as much. For me, I’m more in PackRat’s mentality. Getting from point A to point B is my number one priority, fuel efficiency is important, but not my main focus. I think using CC is a judgement call drivers learn with experience. I’ve driven through so much rain lately, that CC was not even an option and my fuel efficiency number has not moved either up or down.

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar
I drive by buttons on the wheel

dancing-banana.gif rofl-3.gif

I totally agree! I often tell people I control my speed more with my right hand than I do with my right foot. (Well I used to anyway...before I got stuck in an International) embarrassed.gif

Dennis L's Comment
member avatar

Thanks all for your thoughtful comments.

Chief Brody - I’m having to read yours over a few times to wrap my engineering brain around it. I just woke up.

What prompted my question is that the contract that I signed to drive 12 months for Prime to payoff the cost of my CDL training includes a clause regarding fuel efficiency.

Basically it says that I agree to maintain an average fuel efficiency >8 mpg in order to remain eligible to drive.

I appreciate the comments from the Prime drivers about how fuel efficiency bonus is calculated. I’ll study that further.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I never use the cruise. It's a fuel mileage killer. All the computer control recognizes is "maintain the programmed speed no matter what", so all hills, it's burning it up to maintain. Very inefficient.

Another one I left out is tire pressure, especially on the trailer. Most trailers and trucks are running underinflated tires.

double-quotes-end.png

The under inflated tire part of your comment caught my interest. How do you deal with this? Do you air up your tires to maximum inflation pressure? Please elaborate , thanks

Just keep the tires inflated. Grab dropped trailers for the next two weeks and check the tire pressures. I'm willing to bet more than half the tires will be at least 20 PSI low.

BK's Comment
member avatar

Dennis, please realize that Chief Brody is not only a driver but also a lawyer. What he tells you is hard to interpret. Right, Chief?

Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

Well, I used CC more than the pedal, unless heavier traffic etc. set my cruise to 72 and roll. Upon any incline, even as small as 1% it would lose speed, so I'd mash the pedal, I found out before on my 2019 FLs it does increase power a very small amount, almost unnoticeable. I never worried about the MPG either, like chief, I just wanted to get in as many miles as possible per day/night. And averaged around 7-7.5 mpg most of the time, and got the fuel bonus my last 2 months @ Legends, a whole $120-$150 respectively.

Plus they didn't want us OTR guys fueling in Calif. So I'd do that when I needed to, as soon as I crossed into AZ/NM. We didn't get fuel solutions/stops for the loads, just fuel as needed at Pilot/FJ's. Their point system sucked ! .5 points per 50+ gallon fills. I thought damn, I'm fueling 90-130 gallons should get the point boost every 50 gal. fill hahahaha Spent all my points on food etc before I quit driving. Love's reward points were a LOT better, so I was always, near max limits.

And while on CC I would use the buttons on the steering wheel to go up n down on speeds as needed. Prime's trucks from what I've heard, and seen, are governed slow (62?) And the cruise had a +5, when coming to downhills, I'd use the up/down button to adjust my speeds....It's all about judgement for the road conditions, weather, hills, curves. The front radar sucked at times, slowing me when it picked up the tar thing they fill cracks with... It acted like it was the shoulder white line..

Or vehicles on exit ramps, when they hit their brakes, the radar acted like they were in front of me and applied my brakes too hard. Last 2 weeks, I blocked it off, so it wouldn't do those stupid things, so I was in control of my following distances...Removed the aluminum plate I made for that, before turning in my truck lol ......I think the front radar @ some instances, can be more of a hazard, than a help, especially when it might over brake you, when there's no reason for it, especially if it is wet out hmmmm

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

What prompted my question is that the contract that I signed to drive 12 months for Prime to payoff the cost of my CDL training includes a clause regarding fuel efficiency.

Basically it says that I agree to maintain an average fuel efficiency >8 mpg in order to remain eligible to drive.

I don't think you have to worry about that. There are plenty of drivers who don't hit that 8mpg mark. As long as you aren't idling excessively or running up against the governor limit (62mpg as Steve Reno mentioned) constantly, you won't hear anything about your fuel consumption. My FM would send me my idle% and tell me to keep it under...I-forget-what-the-target-is... if I was idling too much. She would also send out fleetwide msgs once a week or so reminding her drivers not to run constantly at 62mph.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Dennis L's Comment
member avatar

Pack Rat

Our Prime trailers have the automatic tire pressure maintenance systems to keep 100 psi. We also have a TPMS system.

Page 2 of 4 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Advice For New Truck Drivers Automatic Transmissions Time Management Trip Planning
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More