Burnt Out, 2 Weeks Notice, What Do Y'all Think?

Topic 31792 | Page 1

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Phil K.'s Comment
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Not sure where to begin, so I'll start with the basic overview. I've been driving for nearly 3 years and I just recently put in my 2 week notice.

I have a lot of "stuff" going on in my home life that I don't want to get into, but nevertheless I need to take care of. The company really wants me to take a 30 day LOA and is trying to talk me out of actually quitting, but to be honest I am just really burnt out from the job in general and just need a couple months away from it to regain my excitement for it again. I actually like my job and what I do, but I just need a break if you know what I mean. Unfortunately between the things I need to get taken care of and some other things I want to do in general, 30 days just isn't enough time off to accomplish everything.

The company has already indicated that they want me to come back even if I do walk away for a bit. I don't know, what do you all think? Have any of you ever had to just catch a breather for a bit?

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Hi and yes. We all get burned out from time to time and need to care for ourselves. The longer you drive the better you will balance home and work. Without getting into the "stuff" at home.... If there is an illness such as spouse, child or parent that requires your attention. You can legally request 12 weeks Family Medical Leave aka FMLA. Doctors will need to sign off on it, but it would keep whatever benefits and perks you have. Otherwise, if you need some time, then take the 2 months and come back. You did the right thing by giving notice and they may think they are helping you by offering the month.

I hope things improve for you.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

While I respect your need to take care of stuff at home and your desire to take a hiatus, you have a good enough relationship with your company AND apparently your performance is strong, so...DON'T GIVE UP.

If you can work it out with the company to take time off and come back, I recommend you do it.

Please keep in mind that your company thinks so much of you, they're asking you to come back. CONGRATULATIONS!

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Not sure where to begin, so I'll start with the basic overview. I've been driving for nearly 3 years and I just recently put in my 2 week notice.

I have a lot of "stuff" going on in my home life that I don't want to get into, but nevertheless I need to take care of. The company really wants me to take a 30 day LOA and is trying to talk me out of actually quitting, but to be honest I am just really burnt out from the job in general and just need a couple months away from it to regain my excitement for it again. I actually like my job and what I do, but I just need a break if you know what I mean. Unfortunately between the things I need to get taken care of and some other things I want to do in general, 30 days just isn't enough time off to accomplish everything.

The company has already indicated that they want me to come back even if I do walk away for a bit. I don't know, what do you all think? Have any of you ever had to just catch a breather for a bit?

Howdy, Phil !!

Wish I could get others in your sitch up in here, maybe I can.

It happens. Here's ours; When my husband was ONE YEAR (legally) IN to OTR in 2003 (we had our son in 2004) they sure offered him 12 weeks on the FMLA. We really couldn't afford for him to be off that long, so his company at the time..yes a major OTR company, worked otherwise with him.

They gave him two weeks off. Out of the gate. No set 'start back' time, but...close. He went back a day early; had enough of a newborn, haha!

A month or so later, my postpartum set in (or I was just nutty?) .. another week (or what do you need?) time off. His t/t was parked at a local T/S and/or at our home.

As the other veteran drivers have stated; would maybe a week or two, just do you some justice to 'figure out life for awhile?' It worked for us. The FMLA is an excellent reprise, as well. Tom never DID lose his assigned tractor, and to him..the security of THAT, was huge.

I wish you the best, man. All I've/we've got; hope it helps a tad bit!

~ Anne (& Tom!) ~

ps: If you could take 2 weeks and 'let them know how things go' ... it may be all or more, than enough. Rainy/Kearsey and Steve are AWESOME vets to driving, and TT! I'd take their words as valued, as well.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
George B.'s Comment
member avatar

Do they offer Part time? I have noticed a few companies offering pt runs. Stick w them if u can. Seems as if they are willing to work w you. I bet after 2 weeks off you will be chomping at the bit to get back on the road. Look for an instructors position at a CDL school. Just a thought! Best of luck!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Phil K.'s Comment
member avatar

I think some of you may be right. This "stuff" came up rather quickly and I've been pretty stressed out about it in general. I probably rushed myself into a bad decision.

I'm going to call my dispatcher and try to work something out. If I could take a 30 day LOA and add my remaining vacation to the time off I think I'll stay. I need more than 30 days to get done what I need to get done, but I think I could make 40 days work.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
PJ's Comment
member avatar

Phil this stuff happens. We all have lives outside the truck. As Rainey said the longer you drive the better you get at managing it, but at times the unexpected comes along.

You seem to have a strong relationship with your DM and company. Use that to your advantage. They would rather work with a good driver than replace one. It sounds like with good communication ya’ll can make this a win win situation.

I’m not going to get into my situation to deep but I did notify them I’m going in a different direction shortly and they offered me a dedicated run with a hefty guarnteed weekly price tag. It was hard to say no too it, but I did. They understood and since I have a fluid time frame they are working with me on it. I’m in the process of slowing down a bit so I can enjoy more time at home.

Good communication is always the key to success!!!

Dedicated Run:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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