Yard Driver???

Topic 32007 | Page 1

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Brandon G.'s Comment
member avatar

I’m a recent cdl A graduate. I have a elderly dog, that I really can’t bring on the road. I’ve received job offers from quite a few mega carrier but given my situation, I can’t commit to OTR jobs. So, I’ve been looking for something local and my first job offer is a yard driver. Do you guys think this would be suitable for a recent grad or should I hold out for something with more extensive training. I do have a few interviews scheduled for the next coming weeks as a driver trainee for a local gig/s. I am anxious to get back to work since I took 5 weeks off for my cdl course and paid out of pocket. Thanks for your help.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Brandon G.'s Comment
member avatar

Also, this company does occasionally shuttle trailers to other facilities. So, I’m subject to DOT rules.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

I don't know if being a jockey counts as experience to a company. It may be a problem when you're ready to get on the road, depending on how much time has passed between the date you got your CDL and when your ready to go.

As for local gigs, if that's the route you decide to go (no pun intended), you want to make sure that company provides extended training and continued support after training.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PJ's Comment
member avatar

Most local jobs are very hard on brand new drivers. Many have gained and lost careers very quickly. Going otr gives you a good foundation. We have seen a few make it work, but they worked very hard at it.

Yard jockey isn’t a bad gig from some I have talked with. You would certainly gain valuable backing experience. Even though yard mules turn much different than a sleeper truck the principles are the same.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

It would help more, if new people joining here, would put WHERE they live, etc, so they can get more direct answers to your questions.

My last company runs local up and down California, up into Oregon & Washington state routes. Or just locally here, in LA, Orange,San Berdoo, Riverside counties. Big Lot DC's, Wal-Mart DC's, water bottle loads, paper rolls, general freight, etc within Calif. They ONLY require 3-9 months experience, and pay like $25 hourly to start

Brandon G.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for everyone’s comments.

I’m currently living in North Carolina.

It would help more, if new people joining here, would put WHERE they live, etc, so they can get more direct answers to your questions.

My last company runs local up and down California, up into Oregon & Washington state routes. Or just locally here, in LA, Orange,San Berdoo, Riverside counties. Big Lot DC's, Wal-Mart DC's, water bottle loads, paper rolls, general freight, etc within Calif. They ONLY require 3-9 months experience, and pay like $25 hourly to start

Brandon G.'s Comment
member avatar

My other question is, would this work be considered tractor trailer experience since we do occasionally move trailers to other facilities? I know a strictly yard driven position wouldn’t but how about in this case?

Anne A. (Momma Anne) & To's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for everyone’s comments.

I’m currently living in North Carolina.

double-quotes-start.png

It would help more, if new people joining here, would put WHERE they live, etc, so they can get more direct answers to your questions.

My last company runs local up and down California, up into Oregon & Washington state routes. Or just locally here, in LA, Orange,San Berdoo, Riverside counties. Big Lot DC's, Wal-Mart DC's, water bottle loads, paper rolls, general freight, etc within Calif. They ONLY require 3-9 months experience, and pay like $25 hourly to start

double-quotes-end.png

Add it to your profile! Thanks !

~ Anne ~

Banks's Comment
member avatar

My other question is, would this work be considered tractor trailer experience since we do occasionally move trailers to other facilities? I know a strictly yard driven position wouldn’t but how about in this case?

That depends on the job classification per your employer, but typically it does not

BK's Comment
member avatar

What prevents you from taking your dog? Too big? Maybe you can figure out a way. Good luck!

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