Need Advice On Manual Vs Automatic

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William D.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello I have 2weeks left on my school training and going for road test on 8/5 I honestly don’t enjoy driving manual on my road rides I spend more time worrying about shifting then paying attention to hazards and the road i basically need to pass my road test first time I’ve been going without a paycheck during training and need to go back to work should I just switch to automatic and worry about removing the restriction after getting more experience everyone I talk to says all truck except heavy haulers are automatic shifting stresses me out and I worry I will fail cause of that ?

BK's Comment
member avatar

William, I’m a big fan of auto-mated transmissions. Personally, I would not go back to driving a manual. Unless you see some specific need for driving a manual in your future, by all means take your road test in an auto-mated unit. Your reasoning is valid about it being safer driving the auto-mated, at least that’s my personal opinion.

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

Hello I have 2weeks left on my school training and going for road test on 8/5 I honestly don’t enjoy driving manual on my road rides I spend more time worrying about shifting then paying attention to hazards and the road i basically need to pass my road test first time I’ve been going without a paycheck during training and need to go back to work should I just switch to automatic and worry about removing the restriction after getting more experience everyone I talk to says all truck except heavy haulers are automatic shifting stresses me out and I worry I will fail cause of that ?

William, I’m a big fan of auto-mated transmissions. Personally, I would not go back to driving a manual. Unless you see some specific need for driving a manual in your future, by all means take your road test in an auto-mated unit. Your reasoning is valid about it being safer driving the auto-mated, at least that’s my personal opinion.

I'm a 1000% with BK here, man. Just talked to a close buddy on TT (and Fb) yesterday, who is changing his haulings and has the restriction, as well. No concerns AT ALL per the new company. If they 'need' him to eliminate the restriction, they will provide him with the means to do so.

On the other hand; I'd learned on a manual via my other half, and it's kinda all I know. I don't drive (yet) anymore, its a non issue for me, either. Getting my full CDLA WITH no restriction is gonna be a hurdle, unless I can bribe PJ, haha!

Personally (AND professionally,) you'll hear from the vets and mods on here, that having that restriction (like you said, unless you get into H/H aka: heavy haul or 'specialty' hauling; it's mostly a non issue.) LTL , on the other hand (OTOH...) does not care for the restriction, at least in my Ohio knowledge.

If you feel that strongly it's a downfall for you, understandably, DROP IT LIKE IT'S HOT & go auto!!

~ Anne ~

ps: Here's a TON of threads, articles, AND blogs . . . re: this subject : Auto, AMT, and/or Manual Transmissions.

pps: Congrats on finally getting things 'MOVIN & GROOVIN' with getting your CDL!!

Apply For Paid CDL Training

Apply For Truck Driving Jobs

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
Wile E.'s Comment
member avatar

Although I recently tested out on a manual, because I didn't want the auto restriction, I would have been fine had I tested on the auto. I drove many years ago, when all the trucks were manual, and it came back to me pretty quickly. The school I attended had both transmissions available, and I drove the auto on one of my road days to see how I would like it. Pretty sweet, actually! I'm talking with several carriers, and so far only one still has a few trucks w/manuals.

Many carriers' fleets are already fully automatic, or soon will be. If I'm in your place, and learning how to shift the manual was giving me issues, I would go auto without reservation. Later on, should you run into a need to get the "E" restriction removed, there are ways to do that.

William D.'s Comment
member avatar

Awesome thanks for the info guys

William D.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you I spent the money and went to a private school called NTTS here in Buffalo my instructor told me to try more road rides with a manual granted I only went 3 times my downfall is downshifting everything else is great he says keep at til ride 6/7 then decide if I wanna switch honestly I rather just focus on the road and not worry about shifting specially during my road portion of the cdl road test I ace pre trip and backing maneuvers but down shifting gets me flustered 😫

double-quotes-start.png

Hello I have 2weeks left on my school training and going for road test on 8/5 I honestly don’t enjoy driving manual on my road rides I spend more time worrying about shifting then paying attention to hazards and the road i basically need to pass my road test first time I’ve been going without a paycheck during training and need to go back to work should I just switch to automatic and worry about removing the restriction after getting more experience everyone I talk to says all truck except heavy haulers are automatic shifting stresses me out and I worry I will fail cause of that ?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-start.png

William, I’m a big fan of auto-mated transmissions. Personally, I would not go back to driving a manual. Unless you see some specific need for driving a manual in your future, by all means take your road test in an auto-mated unit. Your reasoning is valid about it being safer driving the auto-mated, at least that’s my personal opinion.

double-quotes-end.png

I'm a 1000% with BK here, man. Just talked to a close buddy on TT (and Fb) yesterday, who is changing his haulings and has the restriction, as well. No concerns AT ALL per the new company. If they 'need' him to eliminate the restriction, they will provide him with the means to do so.

On the other hand; I'd learned on a manual via my other half, and it's kinda all I know. I don't drive (yet) anymore, its a non issue for me, either. Getting my full CDLA WITH no restriction is gonna be a hurdle, unless I can bribe PJ, haha!

Personally (AND professionally,) you'll hear from the vets and mods on here, that having that restriction (like you said, unless you get into H/H aka: heavy haul or 'specialty' hauling; it's mostly a non issue.) LTL , on the other hand (OTOH...) does not care for the restriction, at least in my Ohio knowledge.

If you feel that strongly it's a downfall for you, understandably, DROP IT LIKE IT'S HOT & go auto!!

~ Anne ~

ps: Here's a TON of threads, articles, AND blogs . . . re: this subject : Auto, AMT, and/or Manual Transmissions.

pps: Congrats on finally getting things 'MOVIN & GROOVIN' with getting your CDL!!

Apply For Paid CDL Training

Apply For Truck Driving Jobs

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

Awesome thanks for the info guys

Hey, William~

Either which way, you're most welcome. That's what TT is about!! Are you staying with your current job, that suggested (and perhaps paid for) getting your CDLA? Do THEY care if you have that restriction??

We've had many success stories from NTTS graduates come through here; can't remember offhand. Search in the big white bar above, they'll pop up for you, to peruse.

Let us know what you decide, and how it goes for you. It wouldn't hurt to put 'Buffalo, NY' in your profile, now that we know, haha! Sometimes it helps our members / mods, help YOU. Some states have a bit of variance, re: laws. NYS Coil Endorsement Laws.

Have you spoke with any companies, or thought about what freight type you'd like to haul? (Flatbed, reefer , dryvan?) If you mentioned it elsewhere; I've missed it. I know you mentioned your 'current' company wanting you to obtain your CDLA.

Pre hires are always a good thing, if you are moving on, as well:

And this, a great start : Apply For Truck Driving Jobs

Wishing you the best, always;

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dryvan:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre Hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre Hires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

andhe78's Comment
member avatar

I’ll second Anne, as a Buffalo local driver, I’ve been interested in your journey, and wonder what your future driving plans may be.

William D.'s Comment
member avatar

Well so far I got calls from Schneider,Prime,TMC,DoTFoods,Roehl. I worked at waste management as a heavy equipment operator they did not pay for my schooling but wanted me to obtain a cdl to transfer to a different location with a very generous pay increase. But now I wanna go out Otr and eventually lease my own truck cause that lease operator money is 🫢

I’ll second Anne, as a Buffalo local driver, I’ve been interested in your journey, and wonder what your future driving plans may be.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

But now I wanna go out Otr and eventually lease my own truck cause that lease operator money is 🫢

double-quotes-start.png

I’ll second Anne, as a Buffalo local driver, I’ve been interested in your journey, and wonder what your future driving plans may be.

double-quotes-end.png

Was that a joke? I'm curious as to how much money you think a lease op makes.... Cause I have actual statements and proof. I want to see how far out of the park you are.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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