To All The Experienced Drivers

Topic 32151 | Page 2

Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:
Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

There are so many variables as was stated. Different loads, geographic areas, safety questions. For instance, I ran us 50 over monarch pass on CO. With 43k in the box. It's a very steep mountain pass that is 20 to 30 mph turns with no guard rails and no shoulders in many spots. Had I been concerned with my miles for the day, I would put undue pressure on myself. On top of the safety aspects, I had a two hour delay due to construction.

My DM knows that it doesn't pay as well as a 500 mile job out in Kansas, so he bumped me some extra layover pay and a local surcharge on it. The load was on 278 miles total. I got it delivered safely, and picked up my next load, then squeezed in a 34 due to a stray tornado and inclement weather. During all that I got layover pay for one day added for the weather too.

The only time I start really focusing on miles is towards the end of the month as we get a production bonus based on them, and even then, if I had too much time off, it simply is what it is.

I found for me personally, there is a rhythm that occurs, I'll have a pick up and delivery day, with shorter miles, lots of activities and then a driving day. If it's wide open, I'll get maximum miles for my time driving, usually about 8 to 9 hours. Sometimes the load demands a full 11 hours driving though, and ill sleep at the customer or terminal.

In general it's much more important to me to plan every well, eliminate pressure and stress and drive relaxed but alert in safety.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Thomas D.'s Comment
member avatar

I understand completely, and my question might not have been worded clearly. I'm not fixated on the miles, I understand that safety is job #1. Any incident, accident, transgression, mishap or folly that is within my control negates the mileage no matter if it's 1 or 1 million. If I'm not where I'm supposed to be when I'm supposed to be there, the miles don't matter. The safety of others, myself, my equipment and my load come before any miles.

Dave T.'s Comment
member avatar

It’s completely different for me; If I drive more than 100 miles, it’s been a long tiring day. My furthest stop is only 8 miles one way but I might make that trip 6 times a day with an hour or more to load and 20 minutes to 1.5hr to unload. Traffic is a big factor too. Even with that little bit of driving, I’ve still been working 11.5 hr days which is nothing compared to OTR. When I used to drive OTR , I’d try and push to get that 600 miles in a day but back then, my truck was governed at 63mph. That was a huge safety risk since all the highways are 70 around here. I’ll never forget the time they sent me to Phoenix in my 63mph truck. Those guys would holler at me on the radio to get on the shoulder with my 4 ways on if I was going to drive that slow on I-40… little did they know I had my foot to the floor. I was still able to hit 3k miles a week consistently though.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
BK's Comment
member avatar

I have to admit that it’s hard not to keep tab on the miles when most of us are getting paid by the mile. And most if not all trucking companies want us to put up a good number of miles AND be safe at the same time. Looking at my 8 day log is like a tale of two cities. Lots of miles some days, very few the next, etc. it’s the nature of the beast. Yesterday I got 410 and was lucky to get that. Many small towns to go through on this route, but the highway was almost deserted, so that was good. Then I got to my destination at 20:15 and the load is not ready. Now it is 08:18 and I’m still waiting. So detention time will compensate for the lack of miles. For me, I just try to go with the flow and get as much done as I safely can.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I completely understand what you're saying Old School, I have 3 goals for every day I wake up. #1) Don't hurt anyone #2) Don't hurt yourself #3) Don't hurt the equipment.

I handle myself in a safe, courteous and professional manner at all times.

#4) Don't end up on Bonehead Truckers or the local news!

Thomas D.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I completely understand what you're saying Old School, I have 3 goals for every day I wake up. #1) Don't hurt anyone #2) Don't hurt yourself #3) Don't hurt the equipment.

I handle myself in a safe, courteous and professional manner at all times.

double-quotes-end.png

#4) Don't end up on Bonehead Truckers or the local news!

confused.gif shocked.png wtf-2.gif undefined

Dennis L's Comment
member avatar

I wasn’t going to reply to this question because I’m a rookie like you. However, I can’t resist any longer.

I agree with Old School and others that a “good day” is achieving my goals for the day safely.

There are so many variables impacting daily miles driven. A big day driving for me is ~570 miles. That only happens on a day with no customer stops, driving the western interstates (ie flat). Think I-40 across OK, TX, NM, AZ.

On a couple occasions I exceeded 600 miles in a calendar day by squeezing in 12.5 hours driving time. I started my day at midnight, drove 10 hrs, took 10 hours break and then drove a few more hours before midnight.

When I first started reading TruckingTruth.com I fell victim to the posts made by drivers bragging about routinely exceeding 600 miles a day and even 700+ miles. I felt like I had to be able to do that to be a “Top Tier Driver”.

I don’t buy into that non-sense any longer.

For starters, those drivers are not in a governed truck, so can drive the interstate speed limits (if they can afford the extra fuel cost these days).

As a Prime Inc company reefer driver, my truck was governed to 62 mph on cruise control and 57 mph on pedal. Any time I turn on windshield wiper the cruise was disabled. My Lease/Op trainer’s truck was governed to 65 mph on cruise, but he could use wipers on intermittent with cruise.

I typically cruise at 60/61 mph when safe to do so. My average speed would be 54/55 mph in relatively flat country in good weather and only modest traffic issues. When I drive the mountains in eastern states my average speed drops to 50/52 mph. Through in rain and traffic slow downs I’m in the 47 mph average range.

I also run on recaps solo driving. I’ve had 8-day summaries with 5 days in the 9 to 11 hrs recaps with 3 days less than 4 hours. It gets challenging sometimes to have enough hours available to meet schedule when the short days fall at the wrong time.

I’ve had several days where I’ll sit for 14 to 19 hours parked close to my customer waiting to deliver because cant’t arrive more than 1-2 hrs before appointment time. Use these days to rest up and do laundry, etc.

During my last month on the road I noticed a definite slowdown in when I received my next pre-plan load assignments. I’d have to park sometimes and wait a while after a delivery was completed.

My solo driving stats over 10 weeks.

59 driving days out of 70. I took 3 extra days off to handle personal business at home (before my injury).

26 completed paid trips.

21,605 paid miles.

23,816 OD miles.

Ratio OD/Paid miles = 1.10

2,161 paid miles / week with days off

2,382 OD miles / week with days off.

366.2 paid miles per driving day

403.66 OD miles per driving day

2,563 paid miles per 7 days driving

2,826 OD miles per 7 days driving

My average CPM without non-recurring pay adjustments received was 60.8 CPM. My base pay rate was 53 CPM. The difference was primarily Fuel Cost Savings Bonus, Safety Bonus, Service Bonus, Hazmat pay, multiple stop pay, and detention pay.

I was told that Prime Inc “guarantees” dispatching 2,500 paid miles weekly on average. They recently settled a law suit with drivers over this issue. Some back pay adjustments were made last month for this. I even received a couple payments related to this that I subtracted from my CPM average.

So, I’m doing average for a Prime rookie driver. I feel that I have the capacity to squeeze in an extra trip per week as I gain experience and become more efficient.

I’ve been given several long-haul load assignments across country that take up 4-7 days each. Some weeks I’ll complete 3-4 trips. The mix of Drop & Hook vs Live Load/Unload also has an impact.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Dennis L's Comment
member avatar

PS. “Bone Head Truckers” is a YouTube channel you can search for. I can’t get links to YouTube video channels to work.

Has some funny and disturbing videos on it. Hard to believe some of the dumb stuff drivers do. Although I’ve done a couple things that would qualify.

Thomas D.'s Comment
member avatar

Oh, I'm familiar with Bonehead Truckers. I asked my wife after I got my CDL's if I could get me some official truck driver flip flops. She asked if I wanted a divorce. Not sure which way I wanna go with that one....rofl-1.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

Well, hmm....

It's bedtime for the Tomster.. but,

Watched a few since y'all mentioned it... and for s's and giggles... see the following!

Here ya go, y'all. I probably COULD embed the video, but it's not my forte,' nor worth my time for 'boneheads,' LoL!

Bonehead Truckers... YEEEhaww!!

Oh, I'm familiar with Bonehead Truckers. I asked my wife after I got my CDL's if I could get me some official truck driver flip flops. She asked if I wanted a divorce. Not sure which way I wanna go with that one....rofl-1.gif

Little man shifting TWIN STICKS at 5 YEARS OLD!! The Asian Mai guy.. and his AWESOME guests!

AND . . . There's ALWAYS, Kearsey! Personally, I really wish she'd change her channel name, to:

"Kickin' it with KEARSEY !!"

However you watch; there ARE some inspirationals! Wishing you the best, man. Thomas (though not a twin) says best to ya, also!

~ Anne & Tom ~

ps: For some OTR (etc..) fitness and workout info (AND MAY HELP YOU, DENNIS:) Athlean X . . great info!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More