Employing Spouse In Trucking (non Driving)

Topic 32244 | Page 2

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Old School's Comment
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Sid puts some specifics into the very things I'm trying to get you to discuss when I ask what sets you apart. I see a lot of wishful thinking in your comments. I have a gut feeling your wife knows how that wishful thinking usually turns out. I'm not trying to touch a nerve. I just think you need to be a little more realistic. Just because you own some trucks does not mean you'll be making money. In fact it oftentimes proves to be very much a struggle.

Stevo Reno's Comment
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Let alone the tripled expense savings for break downs, maintenance, tires, insuring 2 other drivers.... etc Just off the top of my small brain hahaha

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
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Thats exactly what I'm doing. Looking to see if some more experienced guys than myself think wether it's a good idea, a bad idea, or ways that can help me make this a concrete plan despite how it goes. Different viewpoints are always a good thing even when its a conflicting or unalike viewpoint. Im not much of an internet person but isn't what this platform is for?

As a company driver's wife, YOUR missus having her CDLA (also, as PJ stated) will enable her MIGHTILY in the office realm of things, and then some!! Have her study the HRTP and at least get her permit; SHE NEEDS TO KNOW THINGS! Not just office stuff, whatsoever. I've got an A.S. in business... that spells... donkey in trucking!

I could go ON AND ON AND ON but for now, as a 20 plus year driver's wife with a few runs of my own with my CDLP ... MY understanding of the industry, the logistics, and et al ... is paramount to many wives' ~ especially ones that hope to run the drivers' business.

Were it not for the mods, the professionals, just EVERYONE that matters here on TT, I wouldn't be a speck on glass. If she's willing to learn everything...but for the offset and parallels, you may make it work.

Not joking, good sir. She needs to appreciate with passion, what that driver's day may entail.

I've seen that you aren't appreciating some contributions; YET you asked.... here's mine:

I'm not meaning ANY disrespect, good sir. The BEST recruiters, fleet managers, and dispatchers .... have driven (or can/could.)

Here's a GREAT story, WELL worth the read: The Story of Carl Moyes ~

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
BK's Comment
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My recommendation is that you quit trucking and.be a stay at home dad. Your wife could keep her job, which is probably more secure than being an O/O.

Ryan B.'s Comment
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My recommendation is that you quit trucking and.be a stay at home dad. Your wife could keep her job, which is probably more secure than being an O/O.

In the times in which we currently live, it's probably wise that many a man realize that they don't have to play the bread winner role. It doesn't make a man less of one for deciding to stay home, maybe work from home, especially when that provides the most financial security.

David D.'s Comment
member avatar

Sorry for taking so long. Just got back home for the week. Yes the wife is on board. She wants to learn the industry more and help me do things 110% while getting a couple trucks rolling. We just have both a logistical dilemma and a personal dilemma on if she wants to stay home or just go part time. I didn't know how best guys have spouses help them run things. still debating on if its worth it to have her quit a good job or go to part time. I haul haz chem tankers and leased to a company that loves owner operators so its the best situation/place to have multiple trucks. Great paying loads with a decent support system that always points me in the right direction. We have a couple drivers that have multiple drivers under them and do well. It is understood how the market currently is but as all the guys trucking longer than I have been alive say "we don't do this to get rich, we do it because we love it" and I love this. My great grandpa had a small fleet, owned a truck stop with a diner, and a farm and thats exactly what I'm wanting to do (minus the truck stop).

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

PJ's Comment
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David I did what your planning. I was leased onto QC at the time. We had 2 trucks on and they stayed busy.

What I found was the finding and hiring a driver. I interviewed many but none were up to the task. I finally found one, and that was a bigger headache than I wanted to deal with.

Dealing with tankers and haz is much more involved and it takes the right person to do it and do it well. You put on another driver and their actions are on your plate as far as the company is concerned. Remember with employee’s comes another set of bills, IE: Payroll taxes, workers comp ins, unemployment ins, etc. Before you go further I would check with your company and state to get an idea what your going to have to do.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

David D.'s Comment
member avatar

I think we are getting off topic here by saying how I should manage business, how the market is, and what the bills entail. I understand how it works, have a plan, and realize what it will take to buy MORE trucks and that not what I'm asking. The question is what is the best way to put her to work and how has anyone else done that in the past? How has using a spouse doing clerical work and logistics benefited people in the past?

Old School's Comment
member avatar

David, when I need an answer I generally go ask people who have experience at what I need to know. There's probably less than 1% of us here doing what you are asking about.

BK's Comment
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My first question for couples thinking of going team is : Do you have a plan for the inevitable divorce?

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