Older Potential Driver And Trying To Overcome One Obstacle That Would Prevent Me From Moving Forward.

Topic 32490 | Page 2

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Darin G.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks, I'll look into them!

TransAm has a training program that lasts one week at one of the company's terminals. I think they train at 3 terminals, but don't quote me on the number of terminals. I believe that they allow pets, but it would be best to contact TransAm. The company does not have CDL training, so you would have to get your CDL on your own before going to orientation.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Darin G.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for your reply; I have to admit my age is something I worried about.

I'm also open to local opportunities as well and I know some trucking companies offer both local and long distance jobs that may help me through that.

Depending on the opportunities where you live, it's entirely possible to get your CDL and begin your driving career local, without ever spending a night away from home. I'm one of many drivers who have done it successfully. And at the age of 57 BTW.

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she stays 14 hours a day alone while I work

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This is good, because even home-daily jobs tend to be long hours so this ability of hers will be tested. And you'll want a petsitter on standby just in case you have a breakdown a couple hundred miles from home that results in you running out of hours and having to sit for ten hours off-duty before getting back. It happens.

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Going OTR for the long haul has been something I've wanted to do for a long, long time

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Going the local route can get you out of your current job rut, and might turn out to be something you'd enjoy. But if you have the OTR dream, it's definitely not that. It's more of a routine, doing the same routes to the same places day after day. Many of us have responsibilities at home that preclude hitting the open road for weeks at a time, but that doesn't mean we can't pursue a version of this career. And I'd expect a year or more of satisfactory local Class A driving would shorten the training period at an OTR carrier, but most will still require you to do a few months solo before you can bring along a pet.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Darin G.'s Comment
member avatar

I wanted to post one more time to say thank you to everyone for your replies.

I had adopted my dog from a rescue organization and I also reached out to her former foster family to see if they would help.

They were more than happy to help us out so Mazie will have a place to stay that she is familiar with when I finally get on the road.

My plan now is to go part time with my current employer and start the next feasible CDL course. After that, I'll find an employer and get through my training without having to worry constantly about my 4 legged friend being neglected.

After that, I'll look forward to seeing you folks on the road!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

That's good news!

George B.'s Comment
member avatar

Are you near Asheboro? Future Truckers of America is a good school if you choose that route. Millis trains in Eden. Not sure if they allow pets though!

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

George B.'s Comment
member avatar

No pets w Millis. Sorry didnt do my homework.

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

I wanted to post one more time to say thank you to everyone for your replies.

I had adopted my dog from a rescue organization and I also reached out to her former foster family to see if they would help.

They were more than happy to help us out so Mazie will have a place to stay that she is familiar with when I finally get on the road.

My plan now is to go part time with my current employer and start the next feasible CDL course. After that, I'll find an employer and get through my training without having to worry constantly about my 4 legged friend being neglected.

After that, I'll look forward to seeing you folks on the road!

Howdy, Darin!

Welcome to Trucking Truth; as it seems the others beat me to it this time... I've been MIA due to recent loss of WiFi, but I'll be back around..as time permits, as the resident "Welcome Wagon," per se.

On topic, so many folks are comforted by bringing a 4 legged puppers or kitty along in their rig; I know it will be a must for me, also. It's always nice to wake up to 'toe beans' or a 'derp' face; even their subtle snores!

Most of the first months, however; it is highly recommend by TT and companies alike, that you train with your 4 legged friend en absentia. The last thing you need are any extra distractions, as you learn the land, the truck, and all else. It's awesome you've got that part covered, tho!

Some great reading if you haven't yet, will open your eyes to what's to come:

Another great idea; if you may even consider going the company paid route: Apply For Paid CDL Training. No risk. This'll actually give you an idea what is asked of you, and what you are required to provide.

There's more when you're ready! I hope the above helps;

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Banks's Comment
member avatar

I would advise you against picking a company because they have a short training program. We've had a good amount of transam drivers come in here because they get fired for excessive accidents, blame transam for lack of training and then have difficulty getting hired somewhere else.

Training is a small part of your career, but it's important. It's not something you want to just gloss over and end.

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

I would advise you against picking a company because they have a short training program. We've had a good amount of transam drivers come in here because they get fired for excessive accidents, blame transam for lack of training and then have difficulty getting hired somewhere else.

Training is a small part of your career, but it's important. It's not something you want to just gloss over and end.

Indeed, Sir Banks; I read that suggestion as well, didn't mention however. ANOTHER thing with Trans Am, they tend to push lease.

Another paid training program that has presence in Va., is Stevens Transport, although many advise agains them; PJ's gal started with them, perhaps Ihe can elaborate.

PAM Transport via Driver Solutions is accessible via TT's streamlined app, and has a large presence in your state, as well. I'd give them a look, also. Honestly, terminal proximity is usually unimportant, but may just be, in your situation. Surely worth a try.

Just as Trans Am has a very short training program as mentioned, they tend to push lease. If you've not been educated on such, please read up on why NOT to lease, in many places within Trucking Truth.

Here's a link to blogs and articles: Blogs & Articles re: Leasing; Risk vs. Reward

Best again,

~ Anne ~

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Totally spot-on advice. Road training after going to school and passing the CDL exams is very important. IMO anything less than 4 weeks of road training is insufficient.

My road training (mentoring) was 240 hours of driving (Swift). You’d think that is more than enough… it prepared me so I was barely adequate but far from proficient. And my Mentor? I got lucky, he was top shelf.

Don’t cheat yourself. Look for a happy medium.

Good luck!

I would advise you against picking a company because they have a short training program. We've had a good amount of transam drivers come in here because they get fired for excessive accidents, blame transam for lack of training and then have difficulty getting hired somewhere else.

Training is a small part of your career, but it's important. It's not something you want to just gloss over and end.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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