Signage For Truckers

Topic 32518 | Page 2

Page 2 of 3 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Klutch's Comment
member avatar

Don’t sleep on the reviews, sometimes drivers post very useful stuff there. For the address you mentioned someone posted a pic that shows the fence divider and another posted directions stating to enter using the southern entrance.

Not always.

I went to a place in Atlanta on Saturday that had two identical signs, two driveways (one at either end of the building), and both led to the rear of the building where the docks were located. Finally, a paved lot connected the whole property.

The only issue was a fence subdivided this parking lot. I discovered this once I entered the first entrance. Luckily I was able to exit to the second entrance. None of this was apparent on Google Earth street or satellite views.

4125 Welcome All Road, Suite 100 in Atlanta, GA.

FR8 M4N's Comment
member avatar

One company I worked for had signage for truckers directing them to the different entrances, but the signage is down near the ground! Hello!? And the size of the lettering was too small; had to be right on top of it and then it might be too late, depending on where you had to go. The speed limit on the road was 35 mph. Every so often I'd see a trucked stopped out front trying to make out the sign.

I'm in CDL school and I have it easy; my trainer tells me where to go and when to turn; but I know what's waiting for me on the other side.

After reading someone's post here, sorry don't remember who, they shared the idea of using satellite view on a mapping app. Since then, I've kept that in mind for when I start trip planning and plan to take advantage of that tactic, too.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

I am always in favor of more and better signage it boggles my mind that some places won't spend some money to make everyone's life easier.

On the other hand places will put up signs only to have them ignored. The Amazon building across from us has multiple signs up for trucks to go to the next entrance, and literally everyday their drivers try to enter there.

Chief Brody's Comment
member avatar

My process to drill in exactly to shipper location:

1. Highlight the address from the message in my Prime app:

0178547001666750062.jpg

2. Open it both in Google maps and send it to my Smarlink app which is connected to my Garmin GPS:

0072158001666750198.jpg

3. Find the security gate from the satellite view:

0064092001666750319.jpg

4. Move the location I sent to the Smartlink app to the security gate:

0993955001666750451.jpg

5. Send it to my Garmin:

0719264001666750523.jpg

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

George B.'s Comment
member avatar

I do not fully agree to the "trip planning is key" because some shipper/receivers you dont know what you are getting into until you arrive, road construction, possibly new roads "google maps" doesnt recognize etc. Its not that simple. Bakersfield, my companies directions had the town flip/flopped, if I hadnt been to Grimway before I would prob still be looking.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I do not fully agree to the "trip planning is key"......Its not that simple

No one said any of this was simple. But proper trip planning is the best way to avoid problems like this. Others have responded very similarly to what I'm about to say.

For me, proper trip planning includes finding the customer on Google Maps and verifying that the directions I have from my company match what I see on the map. I also checked the satellite view to see what I could figure out about the place. Are there multiple entrances? Is there any sort of guard shack or gate visible? Can I figure out where the docks are? What landmarks will I see just before I get to the place?

If I have any doubts, I always call the customer for directions. I make sure their directions match what I see on the map.

George, if you don't think it's simple with the tools available today, be glad you weren't driving in the early 90s when I started. There were no cell phones, no Qualcomm , and no GPS. I had a pen, a notepad, and a calling card to make calls from a pay phone. That's how I navigated the country.

I was so thorough with my trip planning because of my experience before having all of those tools available. I learned a lot about finding places with very few tools available. Once the tools became available, things became so much easier! But I never took it for granted. I always did a thorough investigation of each place I went to beforehand. There are many places where you had better not miss the turn into their parking lot, or you were heading straight into a restricted area, a low bridge, or you had a 10-mile drive down a narrow, windy road to find a place to turn around. Getting it right the first time will sometimes prevent a real nightmare.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Navypoppop's Comment
member avatar

George,

Just like everyone has stated here I was driving long before their were cell phones. When I received my next delivery or pick-up from dispatch I would immediately call the shipper/receiver for directions into their facility as well as any other information needed ie: early delivery, where to park and what to expect when I arrived. Today might be slightly changed from my days of driving but talking directly with the shipper/receiver can be a valuable tool also.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
talking directly with the shipper/receiver can be a valuable tool also.

Because I drove before we had cell phones and GPS and all that, I've noticed that many people don't realize the value of old-fashioned tools.

For instance, there is no replacement for a CB radio. Nothing has come along to replace the ability to speak instantly to anyone nearby, and that will always be incredibly valuable in so many ways. Without a CB you will miss out on a ton of important information and opportunities.

There is no substitute for calling the customer to confirm directions. Like BK and George mentioned, there are things that Google Maps or GPS may not pick up on, like low bridges, recent construction, or changes to the laws. Calling the customer will often give you information that you won't find anywhere else.

It's all about being resourceful. The more tools, tricks, and techniques you can learn, the better off you are.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

George B.'s Comment
member avatar

My humble beginnings were in 2005. I didnt have a cell phone. The company I trained with required me to send a trip plan using the route the qualcomm suggested plus an alternate route. Most of my issues were within 5 miles of shipper/receiver. My 39$ cb radio was my savior. I remember somewhere around Atlanta passing a receiver multiple times. Got on cb still issues. Lady at receiver finally started asking multiple drivers our company names. Next thing we heard was follow "schneider, or swift etc" We all were driving in circles. No sign on building. Trees lined entrance. The open gate hiding the actual street number.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

Don’t sleep on the reviews, sometimes drivers post very useful stuff there. For the address you mentioned someone posted a pic that shows the fence divider and another posted directions stating to enter using the southern entrance.

double-quotes-start.png

Not always.

I went to a place in Atlanta on Saturday that had two identical signs, two driveways (one at either end of the building), and both led to the rear of the building where the docks were located. Finally, a paved lot connected the whole property.

The only issue was a fence subdivided this parking lot. I discovered this once I entered the first entrance. Luckily I was able to exit to the second entrance. None of this was apparent on Google Earth street or satellite views.

4125 Welcome All Road, Suite 100 in Atlanta, GA.

double-quotes-end.png

I am commenting in response to this because I found reviews on Google Maps to be quite useful for a delivery I have in the morning. There are signs on the street at this customer that state "no parking." Reading Google Maps reviews (with responses from the customer), I learned that the local township put those signs up to combat the problem of unattended vehicles being left and that the police for this township do not have a problem with trucks being parked on the street when the driver is in the truck. I chose to park at a truck stop a few minutes away, but this piece of knowledge will help, if I want to wait there for my next load. I will have plenty of hours available to drive, but sometimes I don't want to leave the area of a customer without my next destination known because I have gone the opposite direction of my next load in the past. When there is a place to park right down the street, I choose that option.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Page 2 of 3 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More