Rejected Load - No Room

Topic 32542 | Page 2

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Harvey C.'s Comment
member avatar

This is actually pretty common for the inedible tanker division at Prime. Not necessarily that the load was rejected outright, but that you have to wait a day for the customer to have room in their storage tank.

Many of our customers have one or two storage tanks for products such as sunflower oil, canola oil, beef fat, or chicken fat. And they go through the product in the storage tanks in matters of days. Thus, they have to schedule loads so that they 1) don't run out of product and 2) have capacity for the product in their storage tanks when we arrive. I had to wait the next day at one delivery because they had to use what they had in their storage tanks before they could off load me. And even then, we split the sunflower oil load between their two tanks.

In addition, most of our customers take samples of the product and we have to wait for the "lab" to test it before we offload. I've never had a load rejected on that basis. However, I did haul a "courtesy load" for a customer in Iowa. The customer had rejected a load of eggs that was in of our tankers. They made arrangements with a local farmer to off load the eggs into a broadcast spreader that the farmer would use to fertilize alfalfa. I hauled the rejected egg load, which had been sitting in the tank for more than 40 days, to the farm where they pumped the eggs into a broadcast spreader.

Wow, have never heard of eggs being used as fertilizer. It was probably just the best way to dispose of it, don't know what the nutrient content would be. I've used broadcasters in all of my fields, including alfalfa, to broadcast dry fertilizers but those certainly aren't designed for a liquid product but might work, but what a mess. And the flies that would attract. I never knew beef fat and chicken fat were products hauled but I guess that has to be used somehow. Dried blood meal is used as animal feed or maybe they stopped using it since it was spreading mad cow disease.

Michael found out he will need to deal with morning Bay Area traffic to take that load back tomorrow for a 0900 appointment.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Chris W.'s Comment
member avatar

The only rejections I get as a UPS driver is if the placing I am picking up from puts the wrong box crates in for a different location. Once just once they made a mistake in the log and they gave me the wrong trailer number so I found the trailer and took it about 4hrs away and got the whole trailer rejected then called asking what do I do now and why then they said, "uh it appears the trailer number you picked up goes to _______, Sc not _______, AK so they gave the load they wanted me to pickup to someone else and let me take it to Arkansas. I got a sorry for the confusion lol

George B.'s Comment
member avatar

One pallet out of 10 pallets of bacon US Foods refused. I asked what was up, they said they didnt order it. Ok?confused.gif I said well you can have a free one. He!! To the Naw! I ended taking it to the Dallas Food Bank.

Travis's Comment
member avatar

Did you get a whiff when you checked for heel? Probably don my respirator for that 😳🤮

This is actually pretty common for the inedible tanker division at Prime. Not necessarily that the load was rejected outright, but that you have to wait a day for the customer to have room in their storage tank.

Many of our customers have one or two storage tanks for products such as sunflower oil, canola oil, beef fat, or chicken fat. And they go through the product in the storage tanks in matters of days. Thus, they have to schedule loads so that they 1) don't run out of product and 2) have capacity for the product in their storage tanks when we arrive. I had to wait the next day at one delivery because they had to use what they had in their storage tanks before they could off load me. And even then, we split the sunflower oil load between their two tanks.

In addition, most of our customers take samples of the product and we have to wait for the "lab" to test it before we offload. I've never had a load rejected on that basis. However, I did haul a "courtesy load" for a customer in Iowa. The customer had rejected a load of eggs that was in of our tankers. They made arrangements with a local farmer to off load the eggs into a broadcast spreader that the farmer would use to fertilize alfalfa. I hauled the rejected egg load, which had been sitting in the tank for more than 40 days, to the farm where they pumped the eggs into a broadcast spreader.

Chief Brody's Comment
member avatar

Did you get a whiff when you checked for heel? Probably don my respirator for that 😳🤮

double-quotes-start.png

This is actually pretty common for the inedible tanker division at Prime. Not necessarily that the load was rejected outright, but that you have to wait a day for the customer to have room in their storage tank.

Many of our customers have one or two storage tanks for products such as sunflower oil, canola oil, beef fat, or chicken fat. And they go through the product in the storage tanks in matters of days. Thus, they have to schedule loads so that they 1) don't run out of product and 2) have capacity for the product in their storage tanks when we arrive. I had to wait the next day at one delivery because they had to use what they had in their storage tanks before they could off load me. And even then, we split the sunflower oil load between their two tanks.

In addition, most of our customers take samples of the product and we have to wait for the "lab" to test it before we offload. I've never had a load rejected on that basis. However, I did haul a "courtesy load" for a customer in Iowa. The customer had rejected a load of eggs that was in of our tankers. They made arrangements with a local farmer to off load the eggs into a broadcast spreader that the farmer would use to fertilize alfalfa. I hauled the rejected egg load, which had been sitting in the tank for more than 40 days, to the farm where they pumped the eggs into a broadcast spreader.

double-quotes-end.png

I could smell the stench from the ground. The guys who pumped off had to hold their breath when they got anywhere near the lid. As far the heel, I took their word for it. I ended up taking the trailer to Prime's tank wash in Springfield. They said is was pretty ripe.

Rob.

Travis's Comment
member avatar

I don't envy the tank wash guy who had to go inside there. You said this was inedible division? Does that mean the tankers are seperate from food grade? If not I'd think they'd need a special washout/prep or at least a couple high temp washes before I'd personally want food to ever go in it again

double-quotes-start.png

Did you get a whiff when you checked for heel? Probably don my respirator for that 😳🤮

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

This is actually pretty common for the inedible tanker division at Prime. Not necessarily that the load was rejected outright, but that you have to wait a day for the customer to have room in their storage tank.

Many of our customers have one or two storage tanks for products such as sunflower oil, canola oil, beef fat, or chicken fat. And they go through the product in the storage tanks in matters of days. Thus, they have to schedule loads so that they 1) don't run out of product and 2) have capacity for the product in their storage tanks when we arrive. I had to wait the next day at one delivery because they had to use what they had in their storage tanks before they could off load me. And even then, we split the sunflower oil load between their two tanks.

In addition, most of our customers take samples of the product and we have to wait for the "lab" to test it before we offload. I've never had a load rejected on that basis. However, I did haul a "courtesy load" for a customer in Iowa. The customer had rejected a load of eggs that was in of our tankers. They made arrangements with a local farmer to off load the eggs into a broadcast spreader that the farmer would use to fertilize alfalfa. I hauled the rejected egg load, which had been sitting in the tank for more than 40 days, to the farm where they pumped the eggs into a broadcast spreader.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

I could smell the stench from the ground. The guys who pumped off had to hold their breath when they got anywhere near the lid. As far the heel, I took their word for it. I ended up taking the trailer to Prime's tank wash in Springfield. They said is was pretty ripe.

Rob.

Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

Stinks? lol When I worked as diesel tech for Waste management, we had a truck that picked up commercial trash restraunts and the like....Well, it broke down, blew engine (old IH) they had Ford 4 cylinder diesel engines mid frame that ran they hydraulics. So this truck sat out in the far corner of our terminal for 3 weeks, FULLY loaded with food waste, smelled so bad the whole place stunk to high heaven. Of course, my luck I got the truck to rebuild the engine. Got it pulled to the shop, raised the box put steel support poles, in case of leak down on the rams. OMFG ! talk about hard to breathe around this truck working on it. And the floor "moved" lol millions of maggots falling out the back I used brake clean and lighter like a torched and fried them things. Everyone was cussing until I finally got it finished and outta there to go to the dump. But after a week or so ya kinda get used to the stench hahaha

Can only imagine what 40+ day old eggs stunk like !

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Nuts's Comment
member avatar

Harvey I am guessing the farmer uses a liquid manure spreader. They are like a tanker trailer with a pressure pump and a wide boom that makes a wonderful smell for a 3-10 mile radius. If it is a particularly windy day you don't want to be downwind.

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

I've had it happen at Sam's club and lowes. The stores have limited space. In both cases I called my DM and moved several trailers (ours) for the store. Then when the next driver for my company comes, they will do the same. Eventually the store will get the receiving area clear. If I hadn't been persistent they would have had me take the load to our yard and T call it.

Some of our smaller customers over order and we end up in situations like that.

Only other time I get it is when I'm early, which is frequent, but I always try to get the customer to take it.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Harvey C.'s Comment
member avatar

Harvey I am guessing the farmer uses a liquid manure spreader. They are like a tanker trailer with a pressure pump and a wide boom that makes a wonderful smell for a 3-10 mile radius. If it is a particularly windy day you don't want to be downwind.

That would make sense, I haven't used those but am familiar with those being used by dairy farmers. I haven't heard them called broadcast spreaders.

A farm that adjoins ours was until recently owned by one of the largest dairy famers around (at least 10,000 cows) who grew his feed here and hauled it over 200 miles away and then hauled dry manure back on the same specially made trailers he had made that he pulled behind his own trucks, some of which were powered by methane.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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