Internal Debate On Recaps Vs Resets.

Topic 32630 | Page 1

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Davy A.'s Comment
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I'm finding that I'm having an increasingly difficult time stopping after 8 or 9 hours. At the same time, I hate taking resets. I know that on paper, under the right conditions and if enough loads are there, in theory, one could make a bit more running their clock out, if I read the last thread on this correctly.

But we seldom have the loads to do that, and I feel like I'm wasting time when I'm not rolling for a day and a half. On the other hand, with 500 and 600 mile loads, I can push them and it really doesn't work for me to spend a day and a half on them.

I've tried hybrid weeks where I'll run a few 11 or 10.5 hour days and then a few shorter ones, but I dont like it because it leaves me with a couple of days of bad recaps.

Is this normal, do you start to get where you are comfortable running hard consistently and how do you pace yourself into a more consistent routine if possible, especially in OTR?

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Chief Brody's Comment
member avatar

If you simply “hate taking resets,” then keep running recaps. But if, like me and Turtle, that you’re going to get your load there as quick as possible, then you might want to get over your distaste of resets.

You say “we seldom have loads” that allow you to run resets. If you’re going to run resets, you need to force it somewhat. Based on what you said about the 500 to 600 miles loads, Knight is like Prime: they schedule loads based on resets. But if you get the load there early, your DM will try to get you another load as soon as you deliver that one.

In addition to just getting the load there early, there are some tips to make resets happen. First, don’t call and ask if you can come early. Just show up. In my experience they are more inclined to unload you if you’re there. Because the person you talk to on the phone is not the person unloading. Once you’re there, and checked in, the forklift guy just has a list of trucks to unload. He or she will just unload the trucks in the queue. And, worst case scenario, they tell you leave and come back at your scheduled time. PC to a truck stop. But in my experience, if you ask them “If I park over there [open space out of the way], can I just wait here?” they will let you stay and then unload you when the forklift operator has a break between trucks.

The other thing you can do is simply burn through you 70 in 6 days. I called my FM on Saturday to let him know that if I delivered on Sunday, I would be out hours after that until Monday night, but that “I will do whatever you want.” He told me to deliver Sunday. I had 1.5 hour left on my 70 Monday morning. When we talked Monday, he admitted he was confused. He thought I was getting hours back on Sunday night as opposed to Monday night.

FMs want productive trucks. Kearsey’s nickname for her FM is Greedy-Wan Kenobi. Before long, your DM should realize that you’re running the same number of loads in 7 days, and then ready to reload on day 8. Then he’s going to find the loads that will keep you running.

People have talked about being slow. My last three paychecks, had 3,000, 2,500, and 3,300 miles. And, last weekend, I was at home all day Saturday and Sunday.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
PJ's Comment
member avatar

I’ve had to start actually planning loads again. The folks I’m pulling for are able to reload me the same day I unload, or I’m not delivering, just dropping and going again.

By the end of the 6th day I am usually wore out and look forward to a break.

Last week I did run recaps. I had some long days and some shorter, which evened things out, but for me it is more of a headache running recaps. Just my preference.

Doing my thing for 6 months I never had to worry about the recap thing and resets were done at home.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Chief Brody's Comment
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For the record, I don't understand the "I hate resets" perspective. I'm the opposite. Running recaps seems to be a pain in ass, because it requires much more trip planning than running resets. On another thread, Packrat posted his 8 day logs showing that he runs between 8 to 9 hours a day. I can't imagine how much planning it takes to run recaps that consistently.

I'm running recaps for the first time since I began driving. As I mentioned above, I had 1.5 available on-duty hours yesterday morning, which was exactly what I needed to get to my receiver. I used an additional 1.5 hours on-duty checking in and pumping off my load. Then PCed to a truck stop after unloading. I "got back" 9.5 hours last night at midnight, but when I checked my clock this morning, I had only 8 hours of available on-duty time. While it makes sense, I didn't realize that the 1.5 hours of on-duty time I spent beyond my 70 would be subtracted from the time I "got back." When running resets, I have a brand new 70 after a reset. Any extra on-duty time spent beyond my 70 does not subtract from my post-reset 70-hour clock.

Running resets, I know what available hours I have each day, except when get close to the running out of my 70-hour clock: 11/14 every day. I never have to "plan recaps" or have a "couple of days of bad recaps."

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

I appreciate the feedback. It's not so much to say that I hate resets. Although it's probably irrational, it bothers me taking a couple days off. It's probably good for me but it just bugs me a lot of times. I don't mind the planning part for recaps, I actually enjoy it, but am not so good at capping my days between 8 and 9.

Travis's Comment
member avatar

I like resets as I can do laundry and catch an Uber to Walmart to grab supplies and a real restaurant meal etc

Not that you can't do that on recaps but I tend to prefer not feeling rushed

For the record, I don't understand the "I hate resets" perspective. I'm the opposite. Running recaps seems to be a pain in ass, because it requires much more trip planning than running resets. On another thread, Packrat posted his 8 day logs showing that he runs between 8 to 9 hours a day. I can't imagine how much planning it takes to run recaps that consistently.

I'm running recaps for the first time since I began driving. As I mentioned above, I had 1.5 available on-duty hours yesterday morning, which was exactly what I needed to get to my receiver. I used an additional 1.5 hours on-duty checking in and pumping off my load. Then PCed to a truck stop after unloading. I "got back" 9.5 hours last night at midnight, but when I checked my clock this morning, I had only 8 hours of available on-duty time. While it makes sense, I didn't realize that the 1.5 hours of on-duty time I spent beyond my 70 would be subtracted from the time I "got back." When running resets, I have a brand new 70 after a reset. Any extra on-duty time spent beyond my 70 does not subtract from my post-reset 70-hour clock.

Running resets, I know what available hours I have each day, except when get close to the running out of my 70-hour clock: 11/14 every day. I never have to "plan recaps" or have a "couple of days of bad recaps."

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

I don't like taking resets, either. I understand that technically more productivity can be had with resets when crunching the numbers. I think it really depends on an individual driver's situation whether or not it is better to run recaps or reset. Fir drivers who have a predictable schedule for loads, it's probably best to run out the clock, then reset. Running recaps is my preference for this one specific reason: Most of my loads lately are under 600 miles. Even if I have recaps that aren't great, I can get my next load delivered with the time available on my clock, typically. If I have experienced in the past getting a reset in and finding that my next load would have fit in the hours I had available before resetting. For this reason, I don't think there is a right or wrong answer on recaps or reset. There are so many variables that my conclusion is that, driver to driver, week to week, the best approach will differ. I think that's where communicating with dispatch comes into play. Finding out what the loads available are like, if any, can inform one's decision as to continuing to run or resetting.

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

I have a bit of a different take as I always run recaps. However, the reason for that is because of the loads I haul and the customers we service. It’s different for everyone and you have to figure out what works best for you depending on many different factors. The answer isn’t really cut and dry for every driver.

Klutch's Comment
member avatar

I prefer recaps. I’m usually at 66-69 hours for total on-duty in current cycle. When I was trying to run out my 11 every day I would still have a solid chunk of hours left on my 70 when I would be parking for my 34. Just wasn’t enough for the planners to work with when I wasn’t picking anything back up the next day.

For my situation my hours are being utilized better running recaps and I feel much better running the shorter days.

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

Davy A.; I used to run longer (10-11) hours right out of the house, to give myself some good hours on the recap for the following Monday/Tuesday. As the week went on, there'd be days where I might run fewer hours, because of various load issues. But I also did resets while on the road, by visiting some friends. It worked out well, because the company wouldn't count resets as home time and I could maximize my clock for efficiency.

I'm not saying my way is the best way for anyone else, but it did work well for me.

I think I get what you're saying. For me, if I'm going to be away from home, I wanna be making $$. But, if I run hard (10-11hrs driving) three or four days straight, I start to feel it and a shorter day thrown in allows me to recover.

I hope this is helpful.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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