Mileage Pay?

Topic 32794 | Page 1

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Glenñ O.'s Comment
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I'm not sure why most companies today don't pay off odometer, my last two jobs did... I'm finding most companies are using Google miles or some kind of crazy software to determine miles, I always find the software is off by a lot, why do companies expect drivers to drive for free? If I run 3000 miles I want to be paid for 3000 miles, am I wrong to want that?

BK's Comment
member avatar

I'm not sure why most companies today don't pay off odometer, my last two jobs did... I'm finding most companies are using Google miles or some kind of crazy software to determine miles, I always find the software is off by a lot, why do companies expect drivers to drive for free? If I run 3000 miles I want to be paid for 3000 miles, am I wrong to want that?

One problem with that would be this: If a driver makes a mistake and had to re-route, should he get paid for the wasted miles? And how many drivers would take “scenic excursions “ if they got paid for those miles?

I once made a wrong turn in New Jersey that took me 20 miles to correct.

It will be interesting to see what responses you get to this thread. Controversial topic. confused.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Pacific Pearl's Comment
member avatar

....why do companies expect drivers to drive for free?

Because they can. Due to an odd combination of established practices in the industry and exemptions from wage and hour laws they can get away with it. Funny thing, Washington state passed a law saying that any worker who wasn't paid on salary or by the hour (such as by the mile) had to get a PAID 10 minute break every 4 hours. SHAZAM - trucking companies in Washington changed to hourly pay for drivers. No one went blind, got monkeypox or went out of business. Drivers just got paid fairly for out time. Extra tasks, such as training and meetings, dried up. Weird - it was like employers VALUED our time when they had to pay for it.

Before the, "thank you sir, may I have another" crowd chimes in with claims that ppm is performance based, the dead will rise from the grave and western civilization will end with hourly pay - let me tell you about my company's Portland terminal. Portland is on the WA/OR border so drivers from both sides work there. Oregon drivers are still paid by the mile. Washington drivers are paid by the hour. There are teams that drive out of that terminal where one driver is an OR driver and the other is a WA driver - same truck, same route. The WA drivers consistently make more money. Are the OR drivers all just lazier?

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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After my first year, I looked into several companies that paid actual miles. It turned out that they paid less per mile or in bonuses. When I did the numbers. I still made more money. It's similar to getting paid more per mile, but running less miles. In the end, I am quite happy.

Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm not sure why most companies today don't pay off odometer, my last two jobs did... I'm finding most companies are using Google miles or some kind of crazy software to determine miles, I always find the software is off by a lot, why do companies expect drivers to drive for free? If I run 3000 miles I want to be paid for 3000 miles, am I wrong to want that?

There are companies that do pay "hub miles," which is a driver gets paid for all miles driven. Those companies require 1-2 years of experience, and I have a feeling that too mistakes in the way BK pointed out would result in conversations with the company.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Klutch's Comment
member avatar

Have you talked to your dispatcher/supervisor?

When I was OTR , if an assignment was showing a “significant” difference between the practical miles and the actual truck route my DTL advised me just to let them know and they would adjust it.

Most of the time when I saw major differences it was because the practical miles were based off the shortlist possible route and then when I would receive my fuel stop(s) it would be on a much longer route but there were ways to bypass that. If there wasn’t then they would just adjust the miles for me. Sometimes I chose to drive more miles because it was actually faster. To each their own, just discuss with your boss

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

Have you talked to your dispatcher/supervisor?

When I was OVR, if an assignment was showing a “significant” difference between the practical miles and the actual truck route my DTL advised me just to let them know and they would adjust it.

Most of the time when I saw major differences it was because the practical miles were based off the shortlist possible route and then when I would receive my fuel stop(s) it would be on a much longer route but there were ways to bypass that. If there wasn’t then they would just adjust the miles for me. Sometimes I chose to drive more miles because it was actually faster. To each their own, just discuss with your boss

My company has a policy to avoid I-90 through New York and PENNA Turnpike, unless necessary. I had a load going from the Cleveland area to the Boston area. I took I-90 because running I-86 was like 130-150 miles longer than miles paid, while running I-90 was only 10 miles longer. Dispatch chewed me out for running I-90 through New York. I explained why and my DM was like, "I would have added those miles for you to keep you off the NY Throughway." It's all about communication. A safe, productive driver with a company worth anything will be taken care of.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

andhe78's Comment
member avatar
My company has a policy to avoid I-90 through New York and PENNA Turnpike, unless necessary.

What's the reasoning behind that?

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

It stands to reason that sometimes you will get paid more miles than you actually travel between 2 points. I figure it evens itself out. Besides, I imagine the difference is negligible either way.

What's the reasoning behind that?

Probably has to do with the cost of tolls on those roads. Toll prices can really add up if you're taking toll roads often. I'm allowed to take any roads I want, but I always avoid the NJ turnpike from Exit 1 to Exit 7. I don't know if my company realizes I do this or if they even care. I save them over $20 every time I do it though.

I also avoid the PA turnpike as well when I can. At leasts as long as I don't have to go too far out of my way or take roads that go through a bunch of little towns.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
andhe78's Comment
member avatar
Probably has to do with the cost of tolls on those roads. Toll prices can really add up if you're taking toll roads often.

That is the obvious answer, but running that stretch of interstate daily, was curious if there was another reason-lack of hut, weather, dot , etc.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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