Happy New Year! How Slow Are You?

Topic 32801 | Page 2

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PJ's Comment
member avatar

I’ve been running a reefer since the first of Nov and they have been killing me. No shortage at all that I have seen.

Headstones dropped off but I finally found out that was completely due to the company making some major changes for the long term.

I got a call from another guy delivering steel setups for transformers and they can’t keep up and wants me to come over there. I know the customer and they stay busy. He wanted to put me in a brand new 579 Pete he just took delivery of. I politely declined. I have too much money in my own equipment to park it and drive his stuff. He decided to obtain his brokers license so we can do it legally. Once he gets his stuff together I’ll be going back to flatbed.

I can deliver headstones once they get rolling again or haul for him if they don’t have a load. Just keeping all my options open and getting this box off my back, lol.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Delco Dave's Comment
member avatar

Not too much has changed at ABF. Things have calmed down a little bit at my terminal. We have gone from crazy amounts of freight to just plain busy. Still getting OT every week.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

Dry van is still plenty busy for me with Knight. Some areas are lean but they always are this time of year. I just finished a ten day tour of duty in Socal. Even with short loads and layover on nearly every load, I still squeezed in 2800 miles for the week with mostly 200 to 400 mile loads.

As usual no shortage of loads in the frozen tundra states like UT,WY, SD, MT, ID etc. I'm going over I 70 to Denver today, just before a significant winter storm comes in tomorrow so I just turned down one back across it to UT. But the work is there.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

We're still pretty busy. It's slowed down a little since the holidays but we're still busier than this time last year and continue opening more stores. There's a couple days a week we have too many drivers so they're asking people to take the day off (using vacation or no pay), but others they're asking people to work extra. Fortunately people always gotta eat.

Bill M.'s Comment
member avatar

We had a bit of a lull, but nothing too terrible. It knocked off about 2-300 miles/week from my typical >2500/wk. I finished this week with just over 2800 miles. We expect business to increase considerably in the next few weeks. I know an industry analyst I didn't know was an analyst until I started driving last year. LOL. He told me many companies were sitting at 120% inventory by the end of 2022. He and his team predict a steady increase in freight demand starting late this month and lasting through March.

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

I sure don't wanna jinx it for myself, but I'm starting off the year on-track. I'm dry van , no hazmat , southeast regional and the company is smallish (approximately 200 trucks).

Here are a couple of things, I think, work in my favor;

1. There's a good mix of OTR and dedicated loads. I have been (for about the past six months) taking an OTR load out of the house Mondays, get into a dedicated area, where they use me thru Thursday or Friday, and then an OTR load to our main location where I pickup a load that gets me home.

2. Our company has a good mix of manufacturing freight and consumer goods. Our largest customer is Lowe's, so we deliver to many of their stores and many of their suppliers provide us backhauls that get us to the Lowe's distribution centers.

3. I try to stay flexible. I could be pushing to make more $, but the dedicated loads pay a flat rate and this schedule has allowed me to make the monetary equivalent of running 2,400+ miles per week, without much of the stress. Yes, I know I could be making more money. Maybe, maybe not.

Stay safe Drivers! We're counting on you to provide what we want, need and desire.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Bird-One's Comment
member avatar

Well I have a few applications floating around for line haul. There are a few ltl companies currently with ads up. Can’t be much worse than what I have going on now.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar
Well I have a few applications floating around for line haul. There are a few ltl companies currently with ads up. Can’t be much worse than what I have going on now.

Out of curiosity who's hiring? You would probably have times you'd work followed by a few call offs.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Bird-One's Comment
member avatar

Dayton Freight out of Des Plaines keeps posting. I’m actually not far from the Pitt Ohio terminal. They been posting off and on for quite some time now. ABF the other one. My neighbors dad who drives for Jewel put me in contact with an ABF union rep. Jewel sounds like a nightmare to be honest but they are always hiring. I see central advertising regularly but I’m not touching that.

double-quotes-start.png

Well I have a few applications floating around for line haul. There are a few ltl companies currently with ads up. Can’t be much worse than what I have going on now.

double-quotes-end.png

Out of curiosity who's hiring? You would probably have times you'd work followed by a few call offs.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Bird-One's Comment
member avatar

Interviewed with abf today. With the possibility of multiple lay down runs a week and the possibility of even being gone for three to four days, I couldn’t do it. And I was told I’d be on extra board for quite some time. O well. Great health insurance and benefits though I will say.

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