Update: My Journey After My Chaos

Topic 32815 | Page 1

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Kal-el T.'s Comment
member avatar

Some of you may remember me; you may remember that things weren't looking so well for me due to things that were going on in my life that was beyond my control at the time. Well, the good news it, everything worked out just fine and I was able to get started in my trucking career and have been doing so for a few months now.

I started with PAM Transportation, but due to some severe disorganization within the Recruiting and Training team, I ended up leaving PAM. When I finished my training and it was time to get my own Truck, they told me I would have to start my training from day one again due to a mistake made on their part. That was not the only thing that had happened, not even close, but it was the straw that broke the camel's back for me and I walked away from the company. They were very understanding, apologized for my bad experience and bought me a ticket home.

I obtained my CDL on my own, paid out of pocket to attend a school that trained with clutch, so I am fairly certain that is part of the reason that PAM had such a hard time getting organized with me since I didn't start their program fresh, but rather skipped the process of obtaining the license through them. It's just a guess, but that is what I suspect ended up happening that caused the chaos with that company.

It did not hurt my feelings to leave that company, since I wasn't too exited with their extremely low pay at just 32 cents per mile and their extremely low governed engines. They were governed at 63 MPH. I at very least want to hit the speed limits posted to maximize my pay. But, I was willing to do it anyway to earn my 1 year experience mark.

After I left PAM after 3 weeks of being there, I got a much better job offer with a local company out of Kentucky. They primarily travel east in to Pittsburgh and Philly, but they also take me out to Tennessee, Missouri, Mississippi, Alabama, Arkansas and a few states up north of here. They literally pay double per mile what PAM pays and I am home every weekend. Every great once in a while, I get to do my 10 hour recent at home, but I never count on those days, just happy to be home on weekends. My paychecks are very nice and even better, my truck is governed at 73 MPH, which is a nice comfort speed for me on dry road days.

The hills heading in to PA are a nightmare...wow is all I can say. Very dangerous. I stick to the speed limits, pay attention to the suggested speeds of curves, take down hills at suggested speeds or slower, thank god for Engine Breaks, I truly appreciate a clutch when heading down hills in this giant missile with wheels, lol.

I love the open road but not so much inner cities. I am terrified that my Garmin is going to end up trying to take me on a road that isn't good for trucks, or under a bridge that is too low, so I try and be careful with that in that I try not to trust my Garmin any further than I can throw it, heh.

All in all, I am doing well, very happy and having the time of my life doing what I thought I would never be able to do.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
BK's Comment
member avatar

Kal-el, congratulations on getting through what sounds like a somewhat convoluted process. And if you are getting .64 CPM , that’s a great rate for a new driver.

How many miles are you averaging per week?

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

The engines are not "governed", as they are computer controlled and most have been for many years.

What company are you employed with now?

Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

"Local company in Kentucky..."

So you mean a smaller company with one location? Sounds like you are doing regional OTR.

$.64 pm with no experience and a smaller company... 1099?

Be safe out there.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Kal-el T.'s Comment
member avatar

I work for a company called Trade Winds Transit out of Bardstown Kentucky. We primarily haul Jim Beam, Barrens, Heaven Hill and a few other whiskey products. We also do broker jobs to get us back home from ABC's across the eastern states.

Not a 1099, taxes are taken out.

I am considered a mix of OTR and Regional. I average about 2K miles a week, generating about a 1K to 1.2K a week. It's a family-owned company and a really great guy to work for. I could never say anything bad about them.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

I work for a company called Trade Winds Transit out of Bardstown Kentucky. We primarily haul Jim Beam, Barrens, Heaven Hill and a few other whiskey products. We also do broker jobs to get us back home from ABC's across the eastern states.

Not a 1099, taxes are taken out.

I am considered a mix of OTR and Reguonal. I average about 2K miles a week, generating about a 1K to 1.2K a week. It's a family owned company and a really great guy to work for. I could never say anything bad about them.

Good to hear that you found a working home. Life is better when you enjoy the place where you work. Be safe on those Kentucky roads. Some of those state highways and county roads can go from decent to sketchy really quickly.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar
I am terrified that my Garmin is going to end up trying to take me on a road that isn't good for trucks, or under a bridge that is too low, so I try and be careful with that in that I try not to trust my Garmin any further than I can throw it, heh.

Valid concern. Trip planning 101. The only way to prevent this is to use the Truckers Atlas and hand write the directions on a sticky note, or something else readily available in the event your GPS goes Wonky. In addition, we also suggest using Google Maps or like satellite system to get a birds-eye view of your destination and the surrounding area. This way you can begin to understand the locale and plan your entrance and backing approach before arrival. Reduces surprises.

Glad you were able to prevail and get your CDL.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Kal-el T.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I am terrified that my Garmin is going to end up trying to take me on a road that isn't good for trucks, or under a bridge that is too low, so I try and be careful with that in that I try not to trust my Garmin any further than I can throw it, heh.

double-quotes-end.png

Valid concern. Trip planning 101. The only way to prevent this is to use the Truckers Atlas and hand write the directions on a sticky note, or something else readily available in the event your GPS goes Wonky. In addition, we also suggest using Google Maps or like satellite system to get a birds-eye view of your destination and the surrounding area. This way you can begin to understand the locale and plan your entrance and backing approach before arrival. Reduces surprises.

Glad you were able to prevail and get your CDL.

Thank you, G-Town. I really appreciate that info.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar
my truck is governed at 73 MPH, which is a nice comfort speed for me on dry road days.

Just what I want. A new driver doing 73mph and feeling comfortable while doing so.

Out west there are 80mph speed limits. Would you do that downhill also?

Kal-el T.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

my truck is governed at 73 MPH, which is a nice comfort speed for me on dry road days.

double-quotes-end.png

Just what I want. A new driver doing 73mph and feeling comfortable while doing so.

Out west there are 80mph speed limits. Would you do that downhill also?

As I had mentioned: "I stick to the speed limits, pay attention to the suggested speeds of curves, take down hills at suggested speeds or slower"

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