Does Schneider Have Forced Nyc Dispatch For OTR?

Topic 4565 | Page 2

Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:
Dave Reid's Comment
member avatar

In my opinion, and also in the opinion of many trucking companies, New York City is a beast that's entirely different than any other city in the country. I'll give you a couple of stats comparing NYC, the largest city in the country, to Los Angeles, the second largest city:

New York:

  • Population: 8.4 million
  • Population Density: 27,000 per square mile

Los Angeles:

  • Population: 3.8 million
  • Population Density: 8,000 per square mile

Brett is spot-on, as usual.

I've driven in and around LA quite a bit lately. Chicago too. I don't like it :-)

There is no way that I would take an OTR truck into either NYC or San Francisco. Those are my off-limits areas.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

Granted I have only have been to NYC once, but not the horror story I hear. I do believe a driver definitely needs at least 6 months experience before going there. TBH, I prefer NYC over ATL. I absolutely hate ATL. I can tell you straight that H. O. Wolding will not force you into NYC. Doesn't mean you won't get a load heading there and be told to start going while they figure out who will take it in. I have been in Dallas, ATL, Chicago, Minneapolis/St. Paul, Indianapolis, and many other larger cities.

Btw, in NYC overpass heights are measured from the curb with snowpack. So the sign you see for bridge height will generally be between 8 to 18 inches off. Just look at the height of the curb in that area to get a rough idea.

Mark M.'s Comment
member avatar

How did you maneuver around that city. I heard they have freeways that don't allow trucks.

I've been to NYC as a rookie. I survived, its just another city that you have to pay even more attention to. But don't avoid it at all. Sure its tough, but its a fantastic learning experience as well.

ChefsJK's Comment
member avatar

Expressways are your friend and parkways are your worst enemy, stay the hell off of them in NYC. There are huge signs stating that everywhere, lol.

How did you maneuver around that city. I heard they have freeways that don't allow trucks.

double-quotes-start.png

I've been to NYC as a rookie. I survived, its just another city that you have to pay even more attention to. But don't avoid it at all. Sure its tough, but its a fantastic learning experience as well.

double-quotes-end.png
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Expressways are your friend and parkways are your worst enemy, stay the hell off of them in NYC. There are huge signs stating that everywhere, lol.

double-quotes-start.png

How did you maneuver around that city. I heard they have freeways that don't allow trucks.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I've been to NYC as a rookie. I survived, its just another city that you have to pay even more attention to. But don't avoid it at all. Sure its tough, but its a fantastic learning experience as well.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

I just saw a DOT truck stopping traffic so a truck could back up. He had turned into the on ramp for a parkway, instead of the highway, which was right beside it. It is a poor design. Luckily he immediately noticed and stopped.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

JuiceBox's Comment
member avatar

Do not rely on your GPS in NYC. Know you're route before you go. I went into NYC my first month solo. The bad part was the load had 3 stops. Two stops in yonkers and one in long island. I was pretty nervous but I followed my usual routine of trip planning and everything went fine. When all was said and done it really wasn't that bad. I was born and raised in Boston though and travelled to NYC a few times for pleasure. I knew what the roads and traffic looked like but still, waaaayyy different in a big truck.

Jrod's Comment
member avatar

Quoted for Truth.

Not sure where your not wanting to drive but starting your career off like this is not the smartest idea I have ever seen. Later on in your career you might be able to say your not going into a certain area but right now you have nothing to offer up. Zero experience. Hoping someone will give you a job.

On top of that - if you're a new driver who has never driven in NYC - how do you know it won't be your "knack"? Lots of drivers (even drivers who aren't from the NorthEast!) don't mind NYC at all. Many companies even pay extra for drivers who will go to NYC. Why take that off of your earning potential before you even get started? Yes, it can be a challenge, but so is driving the mountains in the winter, or being the driver who delivers to a customer in Chicago for the first time... Or trying to find an empty trailer in LA between 3 PM - 8 PM.

Don't let drivers who couldn't tell you that you can't - before you even try. Most profitable trucking companies aren't going to risk a customer or a cargo loss if they don't think you're up to it.

Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
member avatar

NYC is the worst. But for some it might be their knack. San Francisco also has some challenges. Many places in SF are still have the old cobblestone roads that were in the early 1900's. And many an alley way into there warehouse docks. Where you have to back down these alleyways and then almost jackknife your rig to get it into the dock which is designed for 28' pups. I did it twice, not fun. Had a big sign on the other entrance to the alley that said, "Trucks Only," but this car started down the alley as I was Jackknifing the rig. That was my only two days to SF to deliver. Call me a woose , I don't care. To me it was too stressful. Yes I did it, because I like a challenge.

Like others have said, refusal is a death sentence. Your there to keep rolling that truck down the road. You have a un-written part of the contract with a company. They give you an assignment, you deliver it. end of story. Or quit. But too many quits on your record is also a death sentence. Most companies will not send a rookie into NYC. If they do just be extra cautious and have all 15 eyes out there and as someone said earlier, trip planning is your best friend.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More