Does Anyone Drive For Swift's Dollar Tree Dedicated Account?

Topic 4742 | Page 3

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Unity's Comment
member avatar

My experience with slow stores aren't horrible overall but there was that one store who made me question my sanity. He did mention they keep asking for a different day on the truck so that's something to take into consideration I suppose?

I recommend music....

Most of my trailers where 3000+ as far as I can tell. Had one that was 1,600 lbs over weight and I couldn't more the tandems any more lol. One trailer had a broken pin on the tandems and wouldn't move to make them legal. Why load it like that? Idk, issues you have to work with...

Men don't do it . I was doing the dollar tree account for werner.you need to unload 2000+ boxes for one store .the store employee take they sweet ass time .becuase they don't get pay by the trailer like me. that I get pay for every trailer I unload.you can be waiting for hours in one store .sometime I wait 4 hours to unload watch the video below hope it help https://youtu.be/1xAs8wPI6Cw

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I was wondering how it is and if everything the recruiter is offering me is true. Would like to know about your routes, hometime, and average weekly pay.

Thanks!

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Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Revvin' Kevin's Comment
member avatar

Hi everyone,

This is my first post.

I am a new CDL school graduate. I am considering taking a Family Dollar account out of AZ for Swift. Reading all this has not convinced me that I shouldn't.

Funny thing is that I'm not a young man, but I've been doing labor all my life. The idea of a 100% sedentary driving job does not appeal to me. Neither does flatbedding, so this seems like it may be a good fit for me.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

We highly discourage this.

Way too many opportunities for simple accidents that can end a career before it starts.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Welcome to the forum Revvin! Those dollar store type accounts are brutal. It's a very risky way to get started in this industry and I really encourage you to re evaluate. If you're involved in multiple accidents which isnt hard to do on those accounts it will greatly limit your options if you decide to move on from them. Here is a current diary from a member, Papa Pig, that recently went solo doing the Dollar store account. He drives for a different company but they're all very similar.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Revvin' Kevin's Comment
member avatar

Wow, that man is a bad-a**. I know I should definitely re-evaluate--and I still may--but, I don't know...I think I may be up for the challenge. I've always gravitated to the tasks that others shy away from as having an ace in the hole, so to speak.

I do however take everyone's comments seriously, though, and I very much appreciate the feedback--and the diary.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I think I may be up for the challenge. I've always gravitated to the tasks that others shy away from as having an ace in the hole, so to speak.

That's a fantastic approach, but as a brand new driver, you won't often know what you're getting yourself into until it's too late. I was on a Dollar Tree account for a year at one point. The labor is hard, but that's not the only problem you'll face. The stores are often in small plazas in very busy areas. They're difficult to get in and out of and the backing is tight.

Your schedule is also tight because many of the loads deliver to multiple stores.

We highly discourage new drivers from getting on these accounts. You have a lot to learn and the challenge is fierce. The hard labor, tight backing, busy plazas, and tight schedules are too much too soon.

Don't worry. Those accounts aren't going anywhere. They'll be available when you're ready for them if you want to give it a shot.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I drove by five Dollar General stores two days ago while taking some back roads in Illinois.

I couldn't imagine trying to get in any of those parking lots with a semi. Every one of them would have necessitated a back off of the 2 lane state road, too. Three of these stores was a single driveway for the entry/exit.

There are a lot easier challenges for good pay and benefits out here.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Revvin' Kevin's Comment
member avatar

The nice thing right now is that I still have a couple weeks to decide, as I'm still wrapping up at my current job.

The particular company I may go with (that many people bag on due to a reputation that has been said that they earned) is at the top of my list because they will let me train and drive on a 10-speed manual if I want. That's another topic altogether.

Again, I appreciate all the feedback, and I am reconsidering this even more than I was, LOL.

If I am set on this big company and getting into a 10-speed, there are other opportunities there, and like was said, if I REALLY want a Family Dollar account after I have proven myself, I probably would have no problem getting one.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Papa Pig's Comment
member avatar

Kevin, you commented on my diary post but I will reply here. I don’t do family dollar but do dollar general. A lot of it is similar, but there are differences. In my particular instance, I use rolltainers, uboats, and liftgates to unload. Basically, the speed of unloading is all on me and how fast I can get it off. A lot depends on how well prepared the back room is and the size of the door, is it on an incline etc.

I have not done Family Dollar, but if I’m not mistaken they use rollers, so you will be taking one box at a time and pushing it down a roller into the store. You can only go as fast as the employees that are receiving it at the end. That can cause some problems. Some ppl like this and some don’t.

I was very fortunate that I knew my trainer and rode with him for a week before I decided on the company, and could go out with him and train on the account. This doesn’t always happen. A lot of the folks who didn’t have an “in” went otr for training and when they got to the account had a one day excursion doing the job to get their feet wet. Then we’re expected to do it solo. That can be very bad.

It has been both rewarding and challenging and I am making good money, but it is ROUGH. I’m 42 and some days I’m either physically exhausted or mentally exhausted from trying to figure out the backing situation.

I have slept in some very shady areas where I ratchet strapped the doors shut Parking at the store the night before is a blessing and a curse. I personally want to be home on the weekends and my first 3 choices were flatbed companies that would have dine that but then COVID hit. As soon as my year is up I am planning on moving to flatbed or tanker.

You CAN do the job, but honestly, if you have other options I would recommend starting with a different type of driving. If you choose to do this account, I salute you and will pray for your success, but everything that the other guys are telling you is the truth. Good luck with your decision and career!!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Revvin' Kevin's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the reply, Papa. I am definitely re-evaluating this as a first solo position, and I appreciate your insight, as well as everyone else's.

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