Handicap Truck Parking Spaces???

Topic 14262 | Page 3

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Marc Lee's Comment
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I parked in one in a rest area one time. It was late and I needed a spot. I didn’t realize it was a handicap spot. It wasn’t outline in blue. Didn’t have a sign on a post. Next morning I happen to see a very faded blue handicap symbol on the ground. I didn’t feel that horrible at the time. My back was acting up. When my back starts to act up, my left leg stops being cooperative. I’m sure no one questioned me being the spot the way I hobbled around, lol.

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Whether for real or not, a good limp can be used to great advantage. My legs don't work the best anymore and people are more patient with me when they see me gimp around. However, I can really exaggerate the limp to suit the occasion. For rookies like me, a good, solid limp is a great backing strategy. In a tight situation where we need to G.O.A.L. frequently, limping and also walking slightly bent over elicits sympathy and patience from other drivers. Once I even had a yard driver, who observed my world class limp, tell me to drop the trailer right where it was and he'd put it in the space. (Actually, I was kind of irritated by that because I had already spent about 20 minutes trying and wanted to finish up myself. The other 3 or 4 trucks waiting on me could have waited another 20 minutes. Geez, everybody's in such a big hurry now days.) In fact, I firmly believe this technique should be part of every training curriculum. I'm thinking of making a training video demonstrating how it's done. After watching the video, the students would then go out to the practice range to hone their limping skills. One caution, though. The 'limping technique' is not meant to be an excuse for not learning good backing skills and therefore should be used very selectively and with discretion.

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Bruce, what happened? They seem to have dropped your Technical Advisor tag!

(I'd like to volunteer as a gimpy student in that video).

PRICELE$$!

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Mr. Curmudgeon's Comment
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Wow. The original poster was concerned about insensitivity, but clearly was voicing a question out of curiosity. Folks, having family members that are unable to walk more than about 40ft unassisted gives me a different outlook. If you are not llegally qualified to park in one of those spots, please don't intentionally park there. And, in most states, unlawful parking in a disabled space is citeable as a traffic law violation. Yes. 3yrs on your CSA score. And most of the cops I know, and I know A LOT, will tag a handicap in a heartbeat.

But, as always, you drive your truck, I'll drive mine. Piece.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Before this discussion, I wasn't even aware of handicap truck parking spots. Where are they? At truck stops or rest areas? I did get into a tight HOS situation up in Connecticut at a service plaza and had to park in a space marked BUS. Nobody knocked on my door and asked me to move. Maybe I was just lucky.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Scott S.'s Comment
member avatar

Before this discussion, I wasn't even aware of handicap truck parking spots. Where are they? At truck stops or rest areas? I did get into a tight HOS situation up in Connecticut at a service plaza and had to park in a space marked BUS. Nobody knocked on my door and asked me to move. Maybe I was just lucky.

I've seen a few in truck stops and rest areas. Not many though, but I have seen more at rest areas.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Walcott I80 has a handful

Donna M.'s Comment
member avatar

A few weeks back I accidentally backed into a handicap in the reserve area so I pulled out and parked one spot over. Just a little while driver pulls into spot. This guy was beyond obese, I was amazed he was able to get out of the truck. He was barely able to walk. Comes back out with two bags of Wendy’s. Now I’m really watching! Seat all the way back, steer wheel up and he does this squeeze act to get in. He eats his food and then tosses the trash out the window (guess he couldn’t walk to trash can). I understand obesity is a medical condition; however perhaps one less burger and a short walk to trash can would have helped his medical condition.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

A few weeks back I accidentally backed into a handicap in the reserve area so I pulled out and parked one spot over. Just a little while driver pulls into spot. This guy was beyond obese, I was amazed he was able to get out of the truck. He was barely able to walk. Comes back out with two bags of Wendy’s. Now I’m really watching! Seat all the way back, steer wheel up and he does this squeeze act to get in. He eats his food and then tosses the trash out the window (guess he couldn’t walk to trash can). I understand obesity is a medical condition; however perhaps one less burger and a short walk to trash can would have helped his medical condition.

That’s the 1% that gives the rest of us a poor reputation. I call their company when I see a dirtbag throwing out garbage in a parking lot. I may have done other things, too.....maybe.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

A few weeks back I accidentally backed into a handicap in the reserve area so I pulled out and parked one spot over. Just a little while driver pulls into spot. This guy was beyond obese, I was amazed he was able to get out of the truck. He was barely able to walk. Comes back out with two bags of Wendy’s. Now I’m really watching! Seat all the way back, steer wheel up and he does this squeeze act to get in. He eats his food and then tosses the trash out the window (guess he couldn’t walk to trash can). I understand obesity is a medical condition; however perhaps one less burger and a short walk to trash can would have helped his medical condition.

Donna, great observation. You will probably not encounter this guy again because he will die soon from a heart attack or stroke. I just hope it doesn't happen when he's behind the wheel. His company should take him off the road before it happens.

LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

I’m fairly sure I could probably get a HC placard, if I really wanted to take the time to deal with the VA. But then again, I am a little too proud for that. As I like to say though. I’m not handicapped, I’m disabled. Big difference.

Donna M.'s Comment
member avatar

We can’t all be just alike, heck I’m short have to drive with seat all the way up just to reach pedals. However we learn to adjust and as adults we learn there are consequences for our action. Was he fat because the burgers had a lot of calories, no he was fat cause he ate them. People like crutches, I need Adderall, Xanax, etc. okay then u can’t drive a 80,000 pound truck. Who ever allowed that guy to pass a physical was wrong!

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