CDL Defender

Topic 14584 | Page 2

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Tractor Man's Comment
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Ya know Tractor Man...as a resident of Arkansas...there is no Podunk in our fine state. I must now subtract one dancing banana from all of my replies to your posts!! Lmao

MindFreak, I've always wanted to meet someone from Arkansas. Is it true that if you get a divorce you're still Brother and Sister?rofl-2.gifrofl-3.gif

MindFreak's Comment
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Not if it is in a dry county! rofl-2.gif

MindFreak's Comment
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Let me clarify though...I have lived here most of my life but I was actually born and raised across the border in Oklahoma.

Mr. T's Comment
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Thanks for the responses guys!

Rick S.'s Comment
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I got a ticket once in a CMV on my second month of driving. Ran a stop sign that I didn't see in Jetmore, KS and there was an officer sitting right there. I didn't have any of these legal services at that time. I could have gone to court but I just paid the fine in full instead. It was only $175. Luckily its off my record now. That was the only ticket. But let's do the math to see if it was financially worth it for me.

I drove for a little over 3 years OTR.

39 months to be exact. This service is roughly $28 per month.

I would have paid roughly $1,100 dollars in only 3 years. Sure they could have reduced my ticket to $140 thus saving me $35 dollars but end the end it saved me money by not having this legal service.

My point, agree to disagree but I actually think its overpriced. Ive never met anyone in person that has used this service where it actually helped or "saved" them.

I dunno on this one there Daniel.

Through fastidious care - you managed to only get one citation in all those years.

At 100K miles a year the average trucker does - we are 10X more likely than non-CDL drivers to get citations. Crest a hill with a quick speed limit change and the cops sitting right there (aka: speed trap - kinda like the Forsythe cops that sit on the overpass at the I-75 split north of Macon).

EVERY TICKET SHOULD BE FOUGHT IF POSSIBLE. And the benefit of a reduction in charge, no points on your license and most important - not having to return for an appearance.

Again- the cautious conscientious driver should NEVER get a citation - but, "feces occurs".

Kinda like DISABILITY INSURANCE. We think, if we get hurt on the job, Workmans Comp should cover us. But look at a member here (Ahmalia) who recently had a medical incident (not work related) that took her off the road for awhile. She's struggling to stay afloat, while her Dr's and company play tag on her paperwork to get her back OTR.

Insurance is the kinda thing we hope we never have to use - but are glad we have when we DO need it.

I don't like what full coverage insurance costs me for my car - but when my car got totalled 4 years ago - I had check in hand in 4 days. I don't like paying what I pay for a Gold Coverage ObamaCare health policy - but it saved me $1,000's on my recent surgery (that was supposed to be 2 hour outpatient and ended up 5 hours + 4 days in the hospital).

I can't speak to the track record of the company Mr. T is asking about. You can also check with OOIDA to see if they know anything about this particular company.

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

OOIDA:

Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association

Who They Are

OOIDA is an international trade association representing the interests of independent owner-operators and professional drivers on all issues that affect truckers. The over 150,000 members of OOIDA are men and women in all 50 states and Canada who collectively own and/or operate more than 240,000 individual heavy-duty trucks and small truck fleets.

Their Mission

The mission of OOIDA is to serve owner-operators, small fleets and professional truckers; to work for a business climate where truckers are treated equally and fairly; to promote highway safety and responsibility among all highway users; and to promote a better business climate and efficiency for all truck operators.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
OldRookie's Comment
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double-quotes-start.png

At 100K miles a year the average trucker does - we are 10X more likely than non-CDL drivers to get citations. Crest a hill with a quick speed limit change and the cops sitting right there (aka: speed trap - kinda like the Forsythe cops that sit on the overpass at the I-75 split north of Macon).

Rick

Where did you get that statistic... i.e. "10x more likely than non-CDL drivers to get citations?"

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

I don't think Rick threw that out there as a hard statistic. I believe he is extrapolating a number based on the volume of miles a professional will do. What he's saying is that your exposure is much greater.

Another consideration is that many states look at trucking companies as a good solid revenue stream.

Rick S.'s Comment
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I don't think Rick threw that out there as a hard statistic. I believe he is extrapolating a number based on the volume of miles a professional will do. What he's saying is that your exposure is much greater.

Another consideration is that many states look at trucking companies as a good solid revenue stream.

As OS said - it's not a documented hard statistic. Based on the fact that the average car driver does 12-15K a year to and from work, usually via the same route. Versus OTR drivers are all over the place.

Why do you think trucking companies actually "allow for" a few tickets on a driving record? When they should be looking for 100% clean records? because they know the odds are much greater for CDL's to have a few tickets.

Can they be avoided, like Daniel did? Sure they can. But what about that minor-non-dot-reportable accident, that the hard-butt cop just HAS to write you for something.

By their very nature - trucking companies/drivers are seen as easy pickins' for municipalities that seek revenue from traffic citation income - for the very reason that truckers will just "pay up", rather than have to come back and fight the ticket. And for the most part, drivers just look at this as "the cost of doing business".

Back before I had my CDL , I had a much more "cavalier attitude" about my driving habits. I had the best ticket atty in town (16/17 dismissals, 1 reduced/conviction withheld, 0 driving schools). And I hired him, after judges started recognizing me doing my own ticket defense.

My drivers license is my best asset since I got my CDL-A, and I work real hard to protect it - even if it meant selling the sports car, slowing down on the motorcycle, and being more conscientious about not doing "california rolling stops" and the like.

And I don't work in an office - so I (as a non OTR driver) still roll on about 27K miles a year - 99% of it local driving.

The whole point is - due to the amount of miles OTR drivers run, the fact that we're "targeted" frequently as "easy $$" - it might be worth the $28 a month to have the option to pleading not guilty on a citation - not having to go back for a court date - and taking a shot at a reduction in severity of the charge/fines, or even an outright dismissal.

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

I dont know, I have never felt targetted or like im easy money for law enforcement. I have never felt like I was being watched more than the car beside me. I get the logic, but didn't experience it. And considering I look like I'm not even old enough to drive a truck yet I do believe law enforcement had every right to watch me like a hawk, but I didn't experience this in the slightest.

When I got that ticket I very well deserved it and I'm glad it happened because it taught me an extremely valuable lesson early in my career.

Have I broke the rules? More times than I want to admit. Have I dodged weigh stations? Heck yes, and I had a blast doing it! But the one thing you're forgetting Rick, we Russians know how to evade the police. The stupid Russians get caught, the smart ones run right underneath law enforcements noses breaking the rules but always getting away. There you have it!

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

Daniel....you CRACK ME UP!!! I'm still payin' my dollar a day. One year of premiums is still less than my MONTHLY OBAMACARE premium. At least I'll actually have some coverage with my CDL Defender policy. 60 days can't come too soon so I qualify for my Company Health Bennie's!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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