Two Weeks Notice Or No?

Topic 16001 | Page 1

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Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Is it customary to put in two weeks notice before leaving an otr company? I don't have a problem doing that--just don't want to get stuck out here in the boonies somewhere if something doesn't go quite right.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Sambo's Comment
member avatar

Hmm, ethics says yes, but, if you do, are you opening yourself up to getting shafted by your dm? It's a good question, though.

I've heard that loyalty in trucking is pretty thin, and I guess people come and go quite regularly in this industry, as such, I don't think trucking companies expect a notice.

All that is to say, I don't know lol

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Paul, why burn a bridge unnecessarily. You asked if it was "customary." That's different than "should I."

You definitely should if at all possible. I gave two weeks notice when I left my first company, but about a week into that two weeks they routed me into the main terminal for maintenance on my truck. They determined that it was going to be in the shop a few days for some repairs so I talked to my DM and we decided mutually that I might as well go ahead and clean out my stuff and call it quits while I was there.

With this job there is always the possibility that they can't get you where you need to be in exactly two weeks, but they aren't going to purposely try to hang you out to dry. You've read too many trucker fabrications. Trust your good instincts and don't burn a bridge you might wish you could cross later on.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

I figure you could treat your notice to quit like a home time request. At Swift that would 5-6 days.

They just might be sorry to see you go, but frankly there are lots of drivers out there to take up the slack.

Tim F.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm about to pickup my last load for Roehl. Going local for ltl. I gave about a week and a half. I think the important thing is they don't have to go looking for the tractor. I'll be returning it to the Conley Ga yard on Saturday.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Give them two weeks notice. If you want to ever return to Swift, depart on professional terms.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Give them two weeks notice. If you want to ever return to Swift, depart on professional terms.

^^^^ This....

It's more a matter of being professional, and giving them a chance to get your power unit where they want it to be for the next driver.

And also - to get an "eligible for re-hire" in your personnel file. This is KEY for using them as a reference down the road (and remember - trucking job history goes back TEN YEARS). You want to part on the most professional and friendliest terms possible.

On one hand - it's not like there's not enough new drivers coming through the pipeline, that your truck would go "driver-less" if you just put in a request to be routed to a terminal - and then said "I quit" once you got there.

We're all going under the assumption here, that you are moving on to greener pastures (or what you perceive to be), and there isn't anything horrible going on where you have to get out RIGHT NOW.

What are your plans Paul. Got something better lined up? Have you completed your contractual obligation with Swift?

Rick

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Rob S.'s Comment
member avatar

The Swift employee hand book says 2 weeks

John D.'s Comment
member avatar

The Swift employee hand book says 2 weeks

That don't make it law. If you got to move on an opportunity do it.

As I have told my company "you will is me when I'm gone"

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

The Swift employee hand book says 2 weeks

double-quotes-end.png

That don't make it law. If you got to move on an opportunity do it.

As I have told my company "you will is me when I'm gone"

John, seriously, please do not participate in this forum any longer. We have no interest in your opinion. Your attitude sucks. We're all about professionalism here and you're an embarrassment to this industry to be honest. Between this garbage and other things you've said in other posts in the forum like issuing your dispatcher ultimatums or you'll go "get your drink on" we're no longer interested in hearing anything you have to say.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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