Game: What Forum Member Impressed You It Made You Proud?

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Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

I've been on this forum for a little while and have seen quite a few drivers go through school, training, and then go solo. Some of them went through school the same time as I did and what do you know...we are still here lol

I thought it could be inspirational to newbies for us to name some members who have been a pleasure to watch them grow and benefitted from some guidance

Adam was frustrated and wanted to quit training. Things weren't going well with his trainer and he questioned his decision to get into trucking.

Now he's been driving solo for a couple months, doing great and even ran Hazmat his first load!

Figured I'd take the time to say how proud I am of him that he toughed it out. And he made some good money on his first week! Way to go!!

I did it, he did it...and any of you newbies can too. :)

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm proud of Old School. Me and him started OTR pretty much the same time and as far as I remember we both joined TT very close to eachother too (way back in our old forum).

Now he's still kicking butt and writing books on TT many years later!

I'm very proud of all that you have accomplished Old School and always keep the shiny side up. But honestly, whatever you do, stop giving TT lectures at terminals - it just hasn't been working out for you.

smile.gif

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Adam B.'s Comment
member avatar

I've been on this forum for a little while and have seen quite a few drivers go through school, training, and then go solo. Some of them went through school the same time as I did and what do you know...we are still here lol

I thought it could be inspirational to newbies for us to name some members who have been a pleasure to watch them grow and benefitted from some guidance

Adam was frustrated and wanted to quit training. Things weren't going well with his trainer and he questioned his decision to get into trucking.

Now he's been driving solo for a couple months, doing great and even ran Hazmat his first load!

Figured I'd take the time to say how proud I am of him that he toughed it out. And he made some good money on his first week! Way to go!!

I did it, he did it...and any of you newbies can too. :)

I think I owe it to you I did not quit lol. Was pretty crazy my first load was hazmat, since I never ran it in training. Glad I stuck through it though.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Boy that's a tough one. There are so many to choose from. The first one to come to mind would be Kori M., who recently finished training and has upgraded to her own solo truck.

Reading her training diary, and seeing the joy and positivity with which she approaches training, is both inspiring and fun to witness.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

That's a very tough question, lots of really great recent examples; Turtle, Reaper, Big Scott, Victor, Kori,...go back a year ago, Gladhand, Pianoman, Patrick, Tractor, Susan, and Miss Miyoshi. There are many, forgive me for those I left out.

Perhaps the best examples are the folks who got through it, had some bumps along the way, managed to prevail and find the time to give back and help others going through the same trials,...like you Rainy.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
David's Comment
member avatar

I can say, im proud of Daniel B. He joined here just after me, and contributed quite a lot to the TT community. His pre-trip post has helped a bunch of guys/gals here and has saved me a few times too. It is probably one of the most valuable pieces of info here. Good work Daniel, keep it up!

millionmiler24's Comment
member avatar

I would say that I am proud of Brett for starting this site up in the first place. Just look at where its at now. Training companies are sending recruits here to study for their CDL tests. If it wasnt for this site, I probably wouldn't be pn this bus to CRST to restart my journey. Thank you Brett and the other moderators for keeping up with this site. I think we all appreciate it. We love yall and thanks again. smile.gifthank-you.gifthank-you-2.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Shiva's Comment
member avatar

Errol is my guy. Has great advice, great insight. And really helped me when was going through training and had gotten homesick

Diver Driver's Comment
member avatar

I would say that I am proud of Brett for starting this site up in the first place. Just look at where its at now. Training companies are sending recruits here to study for their CDL tests. If it wasnt for this site, I probably wouldn't be pn this bus to CRST to restart my journey. Thank you Brett and the other moderators for keeping up with this site. I think we all appreciate it. We love yall and thanks again. smile.gifthank-you.gifthank-you-2.gif

Kiss ass. rofl-2.gifrofl-2.gifrofl-3.gif

Just messing with ya. When I first started coming around here I didn't know a Jake brake from a tandem axle, from a spread axle.

I'm really thankful for this site. I've found that as long as you own your own actions, (don't come here blaming other people or the company for your screw ups.) you can get all the help you need or want.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Cornelius A.'s Comment
member avatar

will agree with you millionmiler ===---- I think Brett is an amazing guy......I followed te help he gave you very closely and he does not want to take credit for it but he did it

I would say that I am proud of Brett for starting this site up in the first place. Just look at where its at now. Training companies are sending recruits here to study for their CDL tests. If it wasnt for this site, I probably wouldn't be pn this bus to CRST to restart my journey. Thank you Brett and the other moderators for keeping up with this site. I think we all appreciate it. We love yall and thanks again. smile.gifthank-you.gifthank-you-2.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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