Gun Protection While On The Road.

Topic 21407 | Page 1

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Bryan Q.'s Comment
member avatar

Do any of you guys carry protection of self defense ? I have my conceal carry certificate just got to get my permit. Or is all based on company policy ? I guess my Bible is enough protection lol

Jim F.'s Comment
member avatar

I seem to recall my getting the CLP covered that here in Idaho. No way. You'll be walked. Maybe more if the DOT finds it

Do any of you guys carry protection of self defense ? I have my conceal carry certificate just got to get my permit. Or is all based on company policy ? I guess my Bible is enough protection lol

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

There is no law against conceal carry in a CMV. The same carry laws DO apply. You need to make sure your permit covers you in any state you travel into because laws are different in every state. Also, you need to check company policy.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
Mike B.'s Comment
member avatar

There is no law against conceal carry in a CMV. The same carry laws DO apply. You need to make sure your permit covers you in any state you travel into because laws are different in every state. Also, you need to check company policy.

The House of Reps just passed a bill making any Conceal Carry Permit legal in all states. It has to go thru the Senate, then onto the President, I would expect that it makes it thru both with approval. But, if it were me, I'd check with my company to make sure it does not violate company policy...

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
T-Rex's Comment
member avatar

There's an article on here somewhere about that. It's kind of a gray area. While it may be legal in your home state, you have to take into consideration if the state's or cities you're driving through have laws against it or recognize your state's permit. And most if not all companies have policies against it as well as many shippers and receivers. I have my permit and certainly wish I could carry without concern but to this point I haven't risked it. I carry a knife just in case though.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

And what do you do when you arrive at a shipper that bans weapons on their premise? I wish Rick was still around, this topic is right up his alley.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Bryan Q.'s Comment
member avatar

Yeah I’ll check. A friend of mine just mention to me about carrying protection at some of the truck stops because her friends cousin got killed by an ambush.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

First i will.say that NJ is SO strict two recent events happened: 1) trucker got pulled into weigh station, admitted to the permitted gun from another state and got FOUR years in jail.

2) An off duty PA officer and his wife went to Atlantic City, were involved in a hit and run, call the police. At that time, the man identified himself as a PA officer and explained his weapon was under his seat. He was arrested

so i guarantee if you are caught in NJ you will be in a crap load of trouble and pay a ton of legal bills, and lose your job because your company won't be happy.

another thing is, I have yet to see a company say "sure....carry a weapon on our trucks so that when you use it, justified or otherwise, we can face lawsuits."

Use common sense at a truck stop. At night, pull through the well lit fuel island, go grab food and restroom break and then park. I'm a woman and not once in 2 years have ever felt the need to shoot someone. One time I had my hammer out at a customer in downtown Cincinnati and never went back.

i don't understand the perpetual fear of "they will get me so i need a gun" but im from scary NJ, so maybe im used to it, or maybe i'm more aware of my surroundings.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Please realize there is the law, and then of course there is individual company policy. Every carrier I am aware of prohibits any firearms on your person or in your truck; on-duty or off-duty, doesn't matter. Same thing holds true for shippers and receivers.

Considering our employers reserve the right to search their trucks without prior notice; carry at your own risk and realize if caught, it could be highly detrimental to your future career.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dave Reid's Comment
member avatar

There are a lot of options for protection, some legal, some not, some compliant with company policy, some not, some would violate policies at many shippers/receivers, some won't.

There is no way that anyone can carry a firearm in a truck and not run afoul of someone's policy. However, violating a policy is not the same as violating a law, and there is that old saying that it is better to be judged by twelve than carried by six.

It is harder to carry a large knife (legally) in many areas than it is to carry a firearm.

Contrary to what someone mentioned, carrying a firearm doesn't violate DOT regs. The main problem is with state/local laws. If you're former law enforcement and have qualified under LEOSA, you're in the best shape anyone can be in for legal carry, but there are still places you can't legally carry, and then there are those pesky policies of most companies and many shippers/receivers. If you ever cross the border into Canada or Mexico, then even the LEOSA won't help you.

Other than former law enforcement, the best you can do if you want to carry a firearm is get a carry permit from your home state and then also get them from other states that offer non-resident permits if such state doesn't have reciprocity with your state. As someone mentioned, there is a national reciprocity bill pending in Congress...it recently passed the House and will go to the Senate. It faces a tougher battle in the Senate, and the thing is full of holes for those with permits anyway....there will still be plenty of places where carry would be illegal.

Aside from firearms and knifes, there is self defense training, there is pepper spray, tazers (legal in some states for civilians but not in others), there is the tire thumper, and - often overlooked - there is the tactical flashlight. You can legally carry a flashlight suitable for use as a weapon absolutely everywhere you go. They are expensive, but worth it. At one end, a brilliant, blinding light that will disorient an attacker, and at the other end, a striker. I used one successfully to thwart a mugging a few years ago when I was on a cruise and so couldn't take anything else...didn't even have to fight...I showed the three cretins my badge and held up the Brite Strike in a menacing fashion and told them that they could attack me if they wished but I had training that they didn't likely have and at least one if not all of them would end up in the hospital. They turned and fled...I was very lucky, and then spent the next hour or so going through various stages of fright and calming down, etc. There is *never* a time when I do not have one of those lights on me....I carry a Brite Strike with a pocket clip on my strong-side pocket, and I carry a Surefire 6P on my weak side in a belt holster. Of course I have large Mag lights in both door pockets along with tire thumpers, but the things that you can always have with you are the best.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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