Prime CDL Training

Topic 22982 | Page 9

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Stephanie K.'s Comment
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I should be hearing anyway now. They are still running checks on my application. I told her I would be ready to start on the 27.

Wolverine's Comment
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Thanks for the reply Old School.

The one thing that I know I would have a problem with is standing on top of a 13 1/2 foot trailer! Could anyone with direct knowledge tell me if Prime Roehl Swift or Maverick would have that in thair agility test for a refer or dry van drivers? I understand Maverick make their flatbed drivers do it but would they make the TCD drivers do it?

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
G-Town's Comment
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Thanks for the reply Old School.

The one thing that I know I would have a problem with is standing on top of a 13 1/2 foot trailer! Could anyone with direct knowledge tell me if Prime Roehl Swift or Maverick would have that in thair agility test for a refer or dry van drivers? I understand Maverick make their flatbed drivers do it but would they make the TCD drivers do it?

Standing on top of a dryvan or reefer isn’t in any carrier’s agility test.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Dryvan:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Old School's Comment
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Standing on top of a dryvan or reefer isn’t in any carrier’s agility test.

Exactly! It's only those crazy flatbedder who get to live large like that.

Here's what I said, and these are the type if things you will do...

They just have you do a few physical things so they can determine whether you are able to do the physical acts necessary for the job. They may have you squat down and "duck walk" underneath a trailer. They may have you climb a ladder, or into the back of a trailer. They may have you pick up a box that weighs 35 - 50 pounds. It's nothing extremely physical, but they don't want to send you out here if you can't occasionally do something physical when needed.

I added an emphasis on the important phrase.

Dryvan:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Im a Primate and our test is as old school says. if you are FB you lift a tarp, otherwise you dont. climb a ladder a few timez, lift a crate of weights. bending and stretching. no big deal.

supposedly schneider has you pull a rope and drag we8ghts, but someone else can confirm that here.

Kim T.'s Comment
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As of 1700 I am officially unemployed. Now the panic sets in. shocked.png

2 days, 4 hours, 38 minutes until I get in that Greyhound. Yikes!

Dan S.'s Comment
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I had to "bust a move" quick, fast and in a hurry like from my previous job in manufacturing of 6+ years.

I was already planning and plotting, but I just sucked it up, dealt with it, and as Rainy said in another post, just got on the bus.

Now? Here I lay in the top bunk with my trainer in Arizona doing a ten hour clock reset. Closing in on 10k miles of the 30k I need to compete TNT.

It'll go by QUICK! You'll lose track of time. One day will spill in another and before you can blink your eye? A week, a month has gone by

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Kim T.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks Dan. Sometimes I wish I had a couple more weeks and other times I’m ready to go right now.

Stephanie K.'s Comment
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You got this Kim. I'll be there on the 27th. Still waiting to hear what my Greyhound itinerary is. It's a bit overwhelming trying to think of everything that needs done so I can be gone for 3 months. I take 10 vitamins a day. Lord, just sitting and putting them into 90 little baggies, stuff like that, makes me glad I took a few weeks off of working before leaving. And the studying. I am so glad I have more time to focus on it. Are you gonna do a CDL Diary? If so I would love to follow it, as you will be one week ahead of me.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Kim T.'s Comment
member avatar

I think it would be fun to do a diary of schooling not only for other people to read but for me to look back on and see how far I’ve come. Even now, looking back at some of my first posts, I have come a long way from just considering doing this to being a little over 24 hours away from actually getting on the bus.

I only take three prescribed meds a day as well as Excedrin for headaches and Naproxen when needed for other aches and pains. Which reminds me of a question: my meds are filled at CVS. Are CVS stores plentiful across the US or should I consider changing to Walmart pharmacies?

Today is my first full day as an unemployed person and it’s kind of scary. But, it has given me the opportunity to take care of some things that I couldn’t do while I was still working.

Maybe our paths will cross when you get there on the 26th. If not, like I’ve been telling myself...enjoy this, study, and breathe! smile.gif

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

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