Hwy Training Without Living In Truck?

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jaaaaayt1's Comment
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I just got my class A CDL , and I have no interest in being cooped up with some weirdo in a truck for weeks at a time to be trained over the road. Are there any companies that would train drivers on the highways and mountains within a 600-1200 mile radius of their home area? I'm 50 years old and living with some stranger in a small area on that person's terms is not going to work for me. I'm in western Washington and finished CDL School a month ago. I would appreciate any information I could get on this subject. Thank you.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Old School's Comment
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Are you serious? Because if you are, you don't want this very badly. It's a small price to pay to learn how to do this job. One of the toughest things about this is learning to live on the road in such a way that you can be successful at this. You'll never get what you need with your approach.

Your training certificate is already a month old because of your ideas. Once it gets to about three months, you are going to find yourself even more handicapped. At about four months no one will touch you without you going through school again.

Your preconceived ideas are killing any chance you have of making this work. You should be looking at this as an awesome adventure, a chance to learn some valuable lessons from maybe an awesome trainer who is willing to let you into their home and their life, just to help you learn to take your first baby steps into an amazing world of adventure that you obviously know little to nothing about.

Old School's Comment
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Check out this article...

Are You Scared Of That Creepy Perverted Trainer?

Rainy did an excellent job on that piece, maybe it will help you.

Brian's Comment
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I agree with Old School. Not the best attitude. Ive never had to go through the mountains, and probably never will I'm local. But if I were I would 100 percent want to be cooped up with someone like old school before i go flying down Donner's pass without brakes. Another thing to consider is every company is different. With Schneider I was with a trainer for 1 week. Yes that's it a Monday through a half day Saturday and Schneider did an awesome job putting me with a compatible trainer. Or maybe it just worked out that way I don't know. But we were both the same age and prior military. You may want to consider a ltl job but either way you haven't driven for a month you really have to make a move. Don't throw away 3000 dollars because that's what you'll do if you go past 3 months.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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Many of the companies I have been looking at want you to be within 30 days of graduation.

Stevens is 240 hours of driving with a trainer.

But I agree, learning when and where to stop, living in the truck, etc., are all things you will need to know, rather than figure them out on your own, and may mean the difference between success and failure.

I am an extreme introvert, even sharing a hotel room makes me uncomfortable, but I will force myself to do whatever it takes to be successful.

Big Scott (CFI Driver and's Comment
member avatar

You're a 50 year old brat of a child. The smallest violins are playing for you. Here is the

0455666001537777014.jpgFor your whine. Yes, I'm a blunt Yankee.

On the flip side the trainer is letting you live in his home and putting their life in your hands. And you're worried?

Suck it up. Most companies match you up pretty well. I had a great time with my trainer. I was trained and drive for CFI. While out with your trainer you are dispatched as a solo truck. You both sleep at the same time and while you drive, your trainer is in the passenger seat.

Steve L.'s Comment
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Somewhere is a 40 year-old Driver with 10+ years of experience thinking; hmm, company wants me to be a trainer, but I don’t wanna have to live with some creepy 50 yr-old guy who might be smelly and I’d have to adjust MY schedule to. EEUUWWW! 😆

Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
member avatar

John T.

What gives? Sounds like you need to work for some local company that will have you home every night. I guess you didn't grow up yet! I agree with Old School and Big Scott. You think you are different than other 50 year old's here? If you want to go OTR than you have to go with a trainer. PERIOD! END OF STORY! And maybe the end of your short career. You say your 50? Then act 50 not 3. Maybe you need a nap and then you'll have a better attitude. This is Trucking Truth here, not a nursery. If you you want help here from some of the best here you need to change your attitude.

Hey if i have offended others out there sorry. Just being real. I have had challenges and the helpful people here have helped a lot.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
living with some stranger in a small area on that person's terms is not going to work for me.

Something else to consider, also, is the fact that truck drivers live pretty much every moment of their lives on other people's terms. Truck drivers have no authority in any circumstances other than to refuse to drive because the truck is unsafe or the driver is unfit. That's it. Other than that you're driving around on streets following the traffic laws, you're loading and unloading at customers under their rules and procedures, you're working for a company following their policies and procedures, and you're dealing with mechanics, DOT cops, and other drivers on the roads all without any authority over any of them.

So if you're at a stage in your life where you want to call all the shots then I recommend avoiding truck driving and start your own business. Of course even with your own business you're going to be catering to your customers at all times, but at least you'll have some authority over something. In trucking you're at the whim of pretty much every entity you encounter.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Will H.'s Comment
member avatar

Whenever I hear people my age or older complaining about how a lot of younger people are "snow flakes" I always think that they have always been around. And several times a week I am proven that I was correct. This posting is yet more evidence. I really hope OP that you find out what you want and what sacrifices that you need to make to reach your goals.

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