Load Shifted Or Not?

Topic 23864 | Page 2

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Brett Aquila's Comment
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My first guess would be that they put load locks

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I don't know why I didn't think this through. But are you talking about the load bars? If so, they don't have those in there. I was live loaded but I am pretty sure I remember seeing those air bags in between the pallets. So maybe that has something to do about it? Its happening in the same area on both sides.

Yeah, it could definitely be the air bags.

Steve mentioned the change in air pressure. I hadn't thought of that. I'm not sure if I've ever seen that happen or not, where the trailer is so airtight that the walls bulge from the pressure difference. That's an interesting thought.

But yeah, I would guess they really inflated those airbags hard and they're pushing the walls out. But I would still look into it. It takes a lot of pressure to move those walls like that. It's important to know that something funky isn't going on with the freight.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jamie's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

My first guess would be that they put load locks

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

I don't know why I didn't think this through. But are you talking about the load bars? If so, they don't have those in there. I was live loaded but I am pretty sure I remember seeing those air bags in between the pallets. So maybe that has something to do about it? Its happening in the same area on both sides.

double-quotes-end.png

Yeah, it could definitely be the air bags.

Steve mentioned the change in air pressure. I hadn't thought of that. I'm not sure if I've ever seen that happen or not, where the trailer is so airtight that the walls bulge from the pressure difference. That's an interesting thought.

But yeah, I would guess they really inflated those airbags hard and they're pushing the walls out. But I would still look into it. It takes a lot of pressure to move those walls like that. It's important to know that something funky isn't going on with the freight.

That might be the problem with the air bags, I didn't really think about it until now. But it'll be good to have it checked out to be 100% sure, I wouldn't want anything bad to happen and be one of those drivers "I'm sure it'll be fine" without truly knowing. Otherwise it'll bug the hell out of me.

Unlike a lot of drivers, I don't truly mind the down time to ensure my load is secure and safe to move. What's a few hours over the chance of something worse happening.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Jamie's Comment
member avatar

Quick update. I got permission to break the seal, had to take pic of the seal before I broke it and after. It was due to the air bag, pictures below.

0363524001542646331.jpg0793930001542646354.jpg0686191001542646395.jpg

Han Solo Cup's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for posting the picture. That was extremely informative... I also appreciated reading the entire thread about how you noticed it, what you thought you should do, what you did, and I'd love to hear the reply back after you send these pics in.

Jamie's Comment
member avatar

After sending the pictures in, they said it should be safe to keep going as it is. Since there shouldn't be any structural damage or anything alike.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

I'm curious about the change in air pressure. Where did you pick up the load, and where did you stop? Was there a big change in altitude?

Jamie's Comment
member avatar

I'm curious about the change in air pressure. Where did you pick up the load, and where did you stop? Was there a big change in altitude?

I picked the load up on Lawrence Kentucky and I stopped in Joplin Missouri, there wasn't a huge difference. I believe the problem was there from the start or shortly after leaving the shipper and taking some of the turns probably shifted it a tiny bit due to the pressure from the airbag.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Temperature can also affect the pressure inside one of these bags.

Definitely a learning experience for Jamie. This is one of the reasons it’s helpful to understand the basic make-up of the load, review the BOL.

Bagged Kibble is not likely to cause a platewall failure, as the weight is spread out, not concentrated into a small area. A load of paper rolls? Quite the contrary, and can definitely push out the side when coaxed.

Know what you are carrying; how it’s loaded and where the weight is concentrated. All part of planning and preparation. My favorite examples of this are two of my frequent backhauls; Nestle’ bottled water and Kellogg’s cereal. One load, the water is low and fat; 21 pallets at about 45,500 lbs total. Cereal; 60 topped pallets cubed-out at 32,000lbs. Both load configurations will affect handling quite differently, something a driver needs to understand and adjust to.

Good job on asserting yourself Jamie. You did the right thing.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

You did good Jamie!

You were observant and cautious. You also learned some things. You just gained some valuable experience. I really like G-Towns response - it's always good to familiarize yourself with your BOL and your load.

Big Scott (CFI Driver/Tra's Comment
member avatar

After seeing those pics, I would have closed the doors and rolled from the shipper like you did. If you get that load agian, I bet you'll throw strap across as close to the load as you can. Good job.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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