New Local Job

Topic 23920 | Page 1

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Derrick B.'s Comment
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Hey everyone, it's been a while. I posted a bit a few times here when I was having trouble with my first trainer at Prime and got some great advice from the regulars here. I've since left Prime after a year OTR and I've found what seems to be a pretty ideal local job, so just thought I'd share the next chapter. I'll probably update this as I go as to whether it's living up to what I expected as I go along.

As it stands now the job is very simple. Start out each day leaving the yard in southern RI at 4 am, where a trailer is already loaded from the day before, then drop off at one, maybe two stops in the greater Boston area. All freight is no touch. After that, shoot up to Poland Spring in Hollis ME, where most of the time its a drop and hook and then go back to the yard. Rinse and repeat Monday thru Friday for a flat 200 a day.

It sounds like a pretty good gig knowing where I'll be going every day, but I don't know what the stops will be like, or the backing situations I'm going to get into in Boston so I'm sure that'll be something I can report back on lol. It'll also be a lot different working for a small family company like this coming from having only worked for Prime. This place only has 15 older trucks. The one I'll be in is a 1999 Freightliner Century I'm pretty sure. Far cry from my 2018 automatic. I drove it today for my road test with them and it rode and shifted like butter though.

So I just thought I'd post this while I'm optimistic and naive about the whole thing so I can look back and see if its all I thought it would be, because as it stands it doesn't sound too bad. Thanks, Trucking Truth! A few years ago I was on here studying for my CDL permit and now I'm doing the local thing. It can be done!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Old School's Comment
member avatar

All I can say is those Poland Spring loads are gonna be challenging. I'm sure you can handle it - just drive it like you're driving a tanker. Slow and easy on ramps, curves, and stops.

Congratulations on the new gig!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Navypoppop's Comment
member avatar

Derrick, Just like Old School said just treat a water load like it was a liquid tanker as it can "slosh" a little. I for one always preferred a local job or a regional one with 1 or 2 overnights a week but that was me. It allowed for plenty of home time but still satisfied the desire to drive. Most drivers here on TT might say that OTR is the way to go but I feel that it is up to each individual driver to find his comfort zone and then do the best you can. A small family owned company is like a "Mom and Pop" truck stop. They are few and far between anywhere and are usually better to work for than a lot of Mega carriers in my opinion. I for one would be a lot happier in that 1999 Century than the 2018 with the automatic but that is my "old driver" opinion. I hope I don't get too beat up here for my opinions but it is what it is. Good luck to you in your choice and I wish you great success and happiness in the future.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

I wish you the best!

i know i could never do that. its too much like a "real job". lol scheduled days, little downtime (playtime) and no way to break up the day or week. OMG it sounds like work!

to each his own. And yes Navy Poppop, i would rather have my manual, especially when it comes to backing. But no way would i want a 1999. I drove a 2012 in training and it seemed ancient lol

and what did you say about mega carriers???? LOL i wont beat you up.

good-luck.gif

Jamie's Comment
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But no way would i want a 1999. I drove a 2012 in training and it seemed ancient lol

Lucky! I tested out on a manual 1999 Freightliner while on school. rofl-1.gif

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
They are few and far between anywhere and are usually better to work for than a lot of Mega carriers in my opinion

I'd be curious to know why you think a little mom-n-pop with very little money behind them, very few choices available for freight, and old equipment would be better than a large carrier with tons of money, brand new equipment, and a million different divisions to choose from? To me it's like the difference between going to "Frank's T-shirt Store" alone on some little sidestreet somewhere for clothes shopping instead of going to the mall.

Most people say it's because of the "family atmosphere" which seems really weird to me when you're spending your entire day alone on the road in a truck either way. But we just had an interesting post that demonstrates that large companies treat great drivers like family too:

Just Because You Work For A Mega Doesn't Mean You're "only A Number"

Rainy will tell you the same thing about working for Prime, though it might be a bit before she gets the chance. You can often find her enjoying her day at the spa that Prime has at their terminal!

smile.gif

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Kurt G.'s Comment
member avatar

Congrats Derrick, I hope you'll be happy with the new job. I find myself in the Boston area quite a bit at my current job, so I'll be interested to hear what your stops are like. BTW, I hate to disagree with people here because some of them get angry about it, but as someone who's been to Hollis many times I can tell you that a load of bottled water does not have any noticeable 'slosh' or surge. But I can't argue with being careful. Anyway, let us know how it goes.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
I hate to disagree with people here because some of them get angry about it, but as someone who's been to Hollis many times I can tell you that a load of bottled water does not have any noticeable 'slosh' or surge.

We don't get mad when people disagree with us. We might get a little testy when people say dumb or false things though.

I'm actually glad to hear that those bottled water loads don't produce a surge. I've never hauled one, but I assumed the total mass of water would have that effect.

See there, you made me happy by setting me straight! smile.gif

Now we will wait and see if somebody wants to contradict you. rofl-1.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

I've hauled out of poland spring. Not sloshy, just heavy as all get out.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Bottled or small cans should not produce anything noticible. The surge gets going when the liquid has room to roam..... Now 250 gal totes, will be noticible

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