Need Advice - Hubby With Trainer From Hell

Topic 24131 | Page 2

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LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

Welcome to team training. He chose a company that team trains. I do not agree with team training, but many companies do it. It is what it is. If he wanted his trainer to be awake when he was, should of chose a company that doesn’t team train. It is choose your poison though. Companies that team train tend to have longer “training” periods. Companies that don’t tend to be shorter. It is what it is. This industry is about self reliance. You will spend your career “figuring it out”. Like I said, it is choose your poison. A few months floundering with a trainer asleep that ultimately is responsible, or a few weeks with a trainer awake while you are, but you are off the truck before you get used to being on it.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Personally I do not like team training, which is why I avoided starting with a company that does it. Especially if they do it on a lease or owner opp I think some of them take advantage of the cheap labor and it sounds like this guy may be one of them, if this story is accurate. I would have him keep calling and asking for a new trainer that's about all he can do.

But do not just quit over this as it is just one bump in a long road

Bird 's Comment
member avatar

Agree with Bobcat, if this story is true he shouldn't have to put up with some scab who it just trying to collect extra money. Try for a new trainer asap.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Another thing to consider in all of this is what it takes to become a proficient solo driver. There isn't very much you can teach someone about driving a truck. Trucking is a "learn by doing" career. So the nice thing about being on your trainer's truck for a long time and running team is that you get a lot of time behind the wheel but with an experienced driver along to help you through the most extreme circumstances.

I went to school and then drove team with a trainer for two weeks before going solo and I felt as ready as I was ever going to be to go solo. I didn't feel like teaming with that trainer for another month or two was going to make me any better. There were a lot of times, however, that once I went solo I came across circumstances where I wasn't sure what the best approach would be, so I'd make my best guess and learn from the results.

In your husband's case, he's basically driving solo but has someone there to help if he needs it. That's about all you can do as a trainer.

Now you've said there is a long list of stories you haven't told us, so obviously it's impossible to give you advice when we don't know the circumstances. But I do know that most new drivers expect constant instruction from their trainer and they're put off when it doesn't happen. They just have to understand that there isn't a lot someone can teach you about driving a rig. There are basic time management skills, basic defensive driving skills, and communication with your company, all of which can either be learned in the classroom or in a few short days.

If he's just expecting more instruction I would tell him to stick it out with the trainer he has. If there are other more extreme things going on that you haven't told us about then obviously I can't give any advice on what to do.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Team Training can be very beneficial if done correctly. My current trainee said he learned more in 2 days with me than 2 weeks in PSD with the permit. Our permit training is done OTR so that meant a lot to me.

Understanding Team Training

Colleen.... sorry, but no matter how much you prepare yourself for trucking, you dont understand it until you live it. Your son can be the best trucker in the world with 100 years experience but the realities of trucking would still smack your husband in the face.

What we have here is a man who, despite the urging of both his son who is an experienced driver, and his wife who is so concerned she is posting on a trucking forum without him....he still has not stepped up and requested a new trainer. Why?

You can come here and bash the trainer all you want, but if your husband takes no action, this is his fault. All he needs to do is make a phone call. That after hours excuse is just that, an excuse. He could have contacted a night supervisor, they are used to it. He can walk into the campus inn and swipe his Comdata card and prime would pay the motel room cause they own the motel. They would have him talk to the day management for a trainer switch but getting off that truck can be done 24/7 365 days a year. And at all 3 terminals, Pittston PA and Salt Lake City as well as Springfield MO.

I know people who got off the truck at truck stops and Prime sent a truck for them to.bring them back to the terminal , so this "no on was there to help him" is flat out BS.

HE is choosing not to alert Prime, and Colleen is frustrated.

Like I said before, he needs to come post here. He needs to make the decision to swap trainers, he needs to contact Prime. Period.

It could be that he hates trucking and the easiest thing to do is blame the company or trainer.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Ginger Twist's Comment
member avatar

Good news, hubby got off the truck last night and will be speaking with Fleet Manager today to get a new trainer. Night dispatch manager was very cool about it. I want to Thank those who gave good advice and were a positive help. Some apparently think I am the crazy spouse at home. I can assure you I am not, I am currently getting my CDL to join hubby and know I will also have to go through this training process. Let me just set a few things straight and fill in a few gaps. He DID call and spoke to Dispatch last Saturday and informed them of the conditions and they told him with the holiday they would not be able to get him on another truck. He then called his Fleet Manager on Wednesday and left a detailed message but never got a return call. He knew they were heading to Springfield after picking up the current load so figured he would talk with someone face to face. He is ex military special forces so is not a stupid or weak man. He is smart enough to know that the way this guy was is not the way he should be trained. Can’t train someone if you don’t speak to them from day one right? like I said earlier things were very unsafe and unhealthy. From what I am gathering from being in school and reading on here it’s all about the safety of yourself and others. I’ll let hubby give the details if he chooses. I just posted in hopes others may have had similar situations and how they handled it. He really likes the company and wants to continue on with it. He did great handling things on his own from the start, thank God for YouTube videos. He was able to anticipate what he would need help with and would watch the videos ahead of time but that is not the way it should be. He should be able to have someone he can rely on when he goes out on his own that he could call in a pinch for advice, right? Someone started a conversation on here about the best things they learned from their trainers. Those are all the things I imagine are important for a good trainer to teach. If you can’t teach the basics then don’t be a trainer.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Colleen, your husband really should start posting first-person. It will enable our ability to assist him more effectively.

That said, it’s very important he establish proactive communication with his new trainer before setting foot on the truck. Expectations must be clearly understood by both parties; and if there are any issues try to work them out before hitting the road. Communication! Cannot stress this enough.

Wish him good luck!

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Some apparently think I am the crazy spouse at home. I can assure you I am not, I am currently getting my CDL to join hubby and know I will also have to go through this training process.

Nope, never thought you were crazy, you sound frustrated and wanting to help but you have no control to do so, only hubby does

Let me just set a few things straight and fill in a few gaps. He DID call and spoke to Dispatch last Saturday and informed them of the conditions and they told him with the holiday they would not be able to get him on another truck.

Nope, they probably couldnt get him on another truck that same night, but he could have been taken OFF the truck and placed in a motel until the next day or so, AND gotten paid.

He then called his Fleet Manager on Wednesday and left a detailed message but never got a return call.

This was confusing cause our FMs do not have voicemail. They might leave us on hold for a moment, but when they are not in, another dispatcher covers the phones. Therefore there is no leaving messages unless you email or message on the Qualcomm (the dispatcher on duty can then place a system message for the FM to get when they come in). Which means either he called the wrong person who might have been someone else in management or there is some miscommunication going on, either between you and he or you and us here. This is why we like for drivers to do the posting themselves so we can get all the info and even give the names and phone numbers of people who can help.

He knew they were heading to Springfield after picking up the current load so figured he would talk with someone face to face. He is ex military special forces so is not a stupid or weak man. He is smart enough to know that the way this guy was is not the way he should be trained.

Awesome! So he is a smart, strong guy who has past experience making decisions and problem solving! He assessed the situation and came up with a plan of action. So why weren't you trusting him to get things squared away? Or are you asking in anticipation for your future training?

like I said earlier things were very unsafe and unhealthy. From what I am gathering from being in school and reading on here it’s all about the safety of yourself and others.

True, but there needs to be immediate responses for truly dangerous conditions. Your husband decided to wait until he got to the terminal to take action. This depicts he felt safe enough to wait rather than insist on removal from the truck immediately. That was his judgement call.

He really likes the company and wants to continue on with it. He did great handling things on his own from the start, thank God for YouTube videos. He was able to anticipate what he would need help with and would watch the videos ahead of time but that is not the way it should be. He should be able to have someone he can rely on when he goes out on his own that he could call in a pinch for advice, right?

Wrong. Trainers are not friends. Although some will remain friends and stay in touch for years, others never contact each other again. This is why i always recommend a driver get the numbers of experienced drivers who can help once they go solo. i give mine out to every new driver i meet. cause i remember how hard it was. He should have help, but it doesnt mean it will be his trainer when he goes solo.

The company is awesome, but a huge part of trucking is learning on your own...using Youtube videos, Google maps, using the Prime phone app that has TONS of videos on all sorts of mechanical issues, securment, and information. Trip planning is another thing most drivers need to learn on their own. We say the first year in trucking is the most important cause that is when you learn from all your mistakes. It took some drivers 2 months to learn to downshift and 6 mos to learn to back. That is well past training. the training and learning continues way into your solo career.

If you can’t teach the basics then don’t be a trainer.

absolutely correct. but the companies dont know what is going on in the truck unless they are told. they tell us in orientation who to call and what to do in these situations, so your husband should have known. Sometimes spouses vent to each other and the other gets concerned frustrated and feels helpless. its natural. Please dont allow his roller coaster to make you feel helpless or frustrated. Trust him to make the decisions since you say he is such a responsible guy. Im sure you are used to deployments. Believe it ot not, trucking can be similar. My ex of 10 years was 11B and deployed constantly. We trust those guys to get the job done. Same with trucking.

Good luck!!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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