Do Sleepers Have Microwave Ovens In Them?

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Turtle's Comment
member avatar
So, I might have to take some crappy local job as a janitor

With that comment you're an insult to anyone that holds down a job to support themselves.

You seem to have plenty of time while living off the taxpayer's dime to ponder useless drivel and pretend to want to be a truck driver. You could spend that time being a productive member of society. Meanwhile, the janitor is out there getting it done.

I have far more respect for the janitor in the "crappy" job than I do for you.

End rant.

Navypoppop's Comment
member avatar

Thank you Turtle for telling Todd what a clown he is. So far on a lot of other posts and topics he is the most negative person and asks a ton of questions but seems like none of the responses by the great moderators here on TT are acceptable to him. He is wasting a lot of space and time on TT and we can only hope he goes away.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm 54 years old right now. I will not live forever.

I don't want to wait too long before starting to make some decent money.

I'll be dead and it will be too late. I'm in hurry to get right out of poverty.

So, I might have to take some crappy local job as a janitor for a year or two to go from disability to trucking?

Yes. You might have to become a productive member of society and prove your commitment and ability to hold down a job without the disability returning. If you cannot work a week at a local job.with less demands than truckng, then you have no business driving a killing machine.

I wrote to a company today to ask them directly

Oh big deal. You directly asked a major trucking company if they will automatically disqaulify a disabled person. The answer will be no. Otherwise they are in violation of the Disabilities Act. What they will do is bring you to orientation, go over your history and send you home. Then it is not discrimination because they gave you a chance.

Its the same legal loop they use when involving psychotropic drugs, which I am now sure you are on. In case you didnt know, companies can demand MORE than the basic DOT physical. You can go to a doctor and pass, but go to a.company and fail. This is one of the reasons I suggest company sponsored training. If you go to a company taking Trazadone as a sleep aid, you can be sent home and told to switch to another med for 30 days or until stabilized, and come back to orientation. My sister died 4 years before I went to Prime and i admitted to taking the antidepressant Effexor then. I was told "If it was more than 3 years ago it is not an issue", and i had my med record to prove it. That gave me the impression that it WOULD have been a problem had it been less than 3 years.

And each company can set its own standards. Swift might accept your med record at orientation and Prime send you home.

You have no idea what the physical exhaustion can be in trucking. Add that to the fatigue from which you suffer...and you admit your doctors assume if you lose weight that you will improve. What if you dont? What if you get into training and your fatigue returns and you roll the truck and kill people? If you lived, would you even care, because right now you seem to care for no one but yourself.

You need to concentrate on getting well. In every way, physically and mentally.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Todd Holmes's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I'm 54 years old right now. I will not live forever.

I don't want to wait too long before starting to make some decent money.

I'll be dead and it will be too late. I'm in hurry to get right out of poverty.

So, I might have to take some crappy local job as a janitor for a year or two to go from disability to trucking?

double-quotes-end.png

Yes. You might have to become a productive member of society and prove your commitment and ability to hold down a job without the disability returning. If you cannot work a week at a local job.with less demands than truckng, then you have no business driving a killing machine.

double-quotes-start.png

I wrote to a company today to ask them directly

double-quotes-end.png

Oh big deal. You directly asked a major trucking company if they will automatically disqaulify a disabled person. The answer will be no. Otherwise they are in violation of the Disabilities Act. What they will do is bring you to orientation, go over your history and send you home. Then it is not discrimination because they gave you a chance.

Its the same legal loop they use when involving psychotropic drugs, which I am now sure you are on. In case you didnt know, companies can demand MORE than the basic DOT physical. You can go to a doctor and pass, but go to a.company and fail. This is one of the reasons I suggest company sponsored training. If you go to a company taking Trazadone as a sleep aid, you can be sent home and told to switch to another med for 30 days or until stabilized, and come back to orientation. My sister died 4 years before I went to Prime and i admitted to taking the antidepressant Effexor then. I was told "If it was more than 3 years ago it is not an issue", and i had my med record to prove it. That gave me the impression that it WOULD have been a problem had it been less than 3 years.

And each company can set its own standards. Swift might accept your med record at orientation and Prime send you home.

You have no idea what the physical exhaustion can be in trucking. Add that to the fatigue from which you suffer...and you admit your doctors assume if you lose weight that you will improve. What if you dont? What if you get into training and your fatigue returns and you roll the truck and kill people? If you lived, would you even care, because right now you seem to care for no one but yourself.

You need to concentrate on getting well. In every way, physically and mentally.

But I am still welcome to read Brett's material meanwhile as I endeavor to become well again?

The meds I take now are only just before BEDTIME. Naproxen for arthritis pain and Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. They do have a sleeping pill effect. I never take them during the day when I have to drive a vehicle. Never. The label says they may cause drowsiness.

My doctor also says that the arthritis condition should improve when a healthy body weights is reached and a good daily exercise regime is attained.

You see, my hope of ever becoming employable is not yet dead. I don't want people here to be negative and naysayers.

I don't want people to say I'm too old or it's too late for me to ever amount to anything. That I should just throw in the towel and jump off a bridge. Age 55 is scary when you've been out of work and on disability for several years and on limited income. I don't want to grow old and die without having attained a house of my own. I feel time is not on my side. Right now I am essentially getting paid minimum wages not to work.

I would like moral support.

I'd like to hear from people on this board who are in the same boat as I am. Middle-aged and have been out of work a while on disability and have that strong urge to make the kind of money an OTR driver makes.

So, the only questions I will post here from now on will be for something to clarify what I read in High Road Training once I get to it. I will get through Raw Truth cover to cover first. That's my resolution for 2019.

My goal right now is to get well enough to work ASAP, period.

Ok, I have to go on my bicycle ride right now.

Happy New Year, everybody!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Todd Holmes's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

So, I might have to take some crappy local job as a janitor

double-quotes-end.png

With that comment you're an insult to anyone that holds down a job to support themselves.

You seem to have plenty of time while living off the taxpayer's dime to ponder useless drivel and pretend to want to be a truck driver. You could spend that time being a productive member of society. Meanwhile, the janitor is out there getting it done.

I have far more respect for the janitor in the "crappy" job than I do for you.

End rant.

Mr. Turtle:

I'm living off a VA benefit, officially called a Pension, I earned as a soldier of seven honorable years of service to my country. Right now, it's exactly $1,127/mo. tax free. It is not "welfare". Not by a d_mn sight. It was part of the deal when I signed my enlistment contract. Your harsh comment toward me slaps the face of every American veteran. You might be one of those people who would spit on soldiers at airports during the Vietnam era. I want to become PHYSICALLY well enough be able to make a trucker's income. The more I make the more I would pay Uncle Sam in income taxes. High income taxes are a sign of making good money. You see.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar
I'd like to hear from people on this board who are in the same boat as I am. Middle-aged and have been out of work a while on disability and have that strong urge to make the kind of money an OTR driver makes.

Robert D. (RAPTOR) is a great example of it. He truly is an inspiration. He was involved in a nasty motorcycle wreck 7 years ago. He's worked hard to get where he is. According to his profile he had 5 surgeries and physical therapy.He previously drove, and now he's rejoining the industry and he understands that his prior experiences don't mean much. He's willing to do what you refuse to do, approach it with an open mind.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

So, I might have to take some crappy local job as a janitor

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

With that comment you're an insult to anyone that holds down a job to support themselves.

You seem to have plenty of time while living off the taxpayer's dime to ponder useless drivel and pretend to want to be a truck driver. You could spend that time being a productive member of society. Meanwhile, the janitor is out there getting it done.

I have far more respect for the janitor in the "crappy" job than I do for you.

End rant.

double-quotes-end.png

Mr. Turtle:

I'm living off a VA benefit, officially called a Pension, I earned as a soldier of seven honorable years of service to my country. Right now, it's exactly $1,127/mo. tax free. It is not "welfare". Not by a d_mn sight. It was part of the deal when I signed my enlistment contract. Your harsh comment toward me slaps the face of every American veteran. You might be one of those people who would spit on soldiers at airports during the Vietnam era. I want to become PHYSICALLY well enough be able to make a trucker's income. The more I make the more I would pay Uncle Sam in income taxes. High income taxes are a sign of making good money. You see.

No, you aren't. You don't get a pension after 7 years in the military. But if you go to the VA and claim some BS like "chronic laziness, I mean fatigue", you get a disability pension. Meanwhile, veterans who lost limbs and have TBIs can't get in to see a doctor, because people (not my original choice of phrase) like you are sucking up their time with BS.

Get off your ass and get to work.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I'd like to hear from people on this board who are in the same boat as I am. Middle-aged and have been out of work a while on disability and have that strong urge to make the kind of money an OTR driver makes.

double-quotes-end.png

Robert D. (RAPTOR) is a great example of it. He truly is an inspiration. He was involved in a nasty motorcycle wreck 7 years ago. He's worked hard to get where he is. According to his profile he had 5 surgeries and physical therapy.He previously drove, and now he's rejoining the industry and he understands that his prior experiences don't mean much. He's willing to do what you refuse to do, approach it with an open mind.

I spent close to a year flat on my back. I couldn't WAIT to get back to work. How many years have you ridden that gravy train, sucking down taxpayer's dollars?

I have legitimate injuries from my service that my brother berates me every time he sees me, because I refuse to go to the VA and take doctors time away from those who truly need it.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar
The meds I take now are only just before BEDTIME.

my company wouldnt allow you to take them ANYTIME.

Even if i get sick im only allowed Comtrex and Mucinex. Period.

This is how serious it when driving a truck. Would you rather we tell you and give you the reality of the situation or have you be surprised?

And honestly, you keep thowing your VA and military history here, and many people here are probably not impressed because they are military as well. You just accused Turtle of hating vets and you do not know his past. We have tons of vets here and we love them and support them. Many of us have dealt with the aftermath of a military career including rage and have even feared or our lives from the PTSD outbursts. It is absolutely heartbreaking to watch a loved one screaming in the shower trying to wash off imaginary blood or worse, wrestling his hand from your throat cause he thinks you are the enemy while he screams "Wheres my weapon?"

You called anyone working at Walmart or McDs a bunch of punks. Have you taken a look at some of these people? I have no doubt many are senior citizens and even some vets. You are bashing the same people you accuse us of not supporting.

And for those of us who were not in the military, many have vets in our family. My immediate family has every branch covered even the Coast Guard. I spent 16 years consoling Vietnam Vets from the horrors they suffered. I spent 10 years with an infantryman who was constantly deployed, supporting him and sending care packages to his unit, worrying if he would come home. I spent a year at his beside hoping various surgeries would work. When he retired with 22 years, 16 of which was deployed and 100% service connected disabled, he never once called minimum wage workers punks.

I spent 2 years nursing a Navy Corpsman after he was injured and i helped him learn to walk and talk again after doctors told him he would never walk. He would glady taken any job to feel accomplished and proud.

And you sound too easy to anger. How will you be dealing with road rage? Or a nasty customer? What about a rude cashier?

I do thank you and appreciate your service. However your service and disability does not grant you the right to endanger the public or even endanger yourself.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Michael S.'s Comment
member avatar

Ya know Todd, I came into this forum, with an attitude and frustration, and due to 15 years driving experience in the past was a little ****ed that I had to start all over and go through company training again(which I foolishly called indentured servitude) Well this great group of people quickly called out my attitude and gave a lot of great advice, and I thank them for it. In very little time, I turned that attitude around, accepted and followed their advice, and am now very happily signed up to start training with my preferred company of choice. I cant really relate to your disabilities, but can relate to doing 7 years with an honorable discharge. Like someone said, that and $2= coffee Also, it has prompted me to make other sorely needed health and fitness choices where I've been lacking lately. So, take the advice given, use it, do what needs to be done towards a productive life!

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