Jake Brake In Icy Conditions?

Topic 24281 | Page 1

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Bird-one's Comment
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I was curious about using it in snow or ice. I have heard you can use it no problem, and other drivers say not too. Said it would do damage but didn't specify what kind. Which is correct? If it is okay does it help to use in the event you are sliding. Was something that was really never explained to me.

Rainy 's Comment
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The jake slows the truck only, not the trailer so in icy conditions the trailer can slide out of control.

in a nutshell, dont use it.

i have heard automatic drivers say they always use the jakes because its an auto...not me. and im not teaching my students that either. Downshift 2 gears lower than you would with the jakes.

PackRat's Comment
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As Rainy posted, it's only retarding the compression of the engine on the tractor, so the trailer is going to want to give you a big push. More so the heavier the load that's in it.

Big Scott (CFI Driver/Tra's Comment
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I would never use Jakes on snow or ice and very cautiously in very wet conditions. Like the others said the Jakes only slow the truck so the trailer is still moving. this can cause your trailer to swing out from behind you. If you find yourself driving on ice, you don't want to use your breaks at all. You would want to put your flashers on, let off the gas and slow to a crawl. Then get to the nearest safe place you can shut down. On snow also, no breaks. Snow and ice provide very little to zero traction. It takes very careful driving in these conditions.

King Pin's Comment
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When you apply the jakes it slows the tractor only and the trailer is traveling faster than the tractor. The trailer is pushing the tractor and will cause you to jack knife.

I was curious about using it in snow or ice. I have heard you can use it no problem, and other drivers say not too. Said it would do damage but didn't specify what kind. Which is correct? If it is okay does it help to use in the event you are sliding. Was something that was really never explained to me.

Bird-one's Comment
member avatar

Thanks everybody for answering that. Much appreciated.

Saturday with all that snow, watched a truck in front of me starting to loose it on the off ramp. How he recovered not sure. What was for sure was he was going to fast into the ramp. But in the event you do start sliding on an off ramp, is there anything you can really do besides what has already been said?

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
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I almost was tempted to use the Jake in this heavy rain. Then I came to senses and just down shifted. With a super 8, it helps to just use the extra splitter. I will post a pic of this super 8 soon so everyone who hasn't seen one will know what I'm talking about. So the ones who know don't have to tell me what there are. It did take me a good 2 hours to get it in my head the difference from a standard 10 speed.And still I forget sometimes. Mainly between 5 low and 6 high. I sometimes go from 5 low to 6 low which is a NONO. But I kind of like it. But I'm afraid that they will tell there aren't any manuals. Automatics might be great for in town and multiple stops, but I still prefer a manual.

Now before I get bombarded by (G-town)about the luxury of an Automatic. We all have our preferences. So right now I just want to finish my 200 hours.

Yes I know I stayed from the original thread.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

As Pack Rat first pointed out, the Engine Retarders (called "Jake Brakes") only work to slow down the drive axles. They have absolutely nothing to do with the truck service brakes (the air brake system you use to stop with).

So when you turn on the Jakes, there is still nothing slowing down the other axles. Then, as King Pin describes, the front of the trailer - stuck to the drive wheels - will slow down and the back end, on the (unbraked) tandems will want to literally swing around the slow moving front end.

This damage you asked about is called a jack knife. It's also called your last day of CMV driving.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Kurt G.'s Comment
member avatar

I think you also have to be careful when downshifting, for the same reason as the jake brakes. Use the brakes, they will spread the stopping force over all the wheels, and you also have ABS if some wheels lose traction.

Dave (formerly known as K's Comment
member avatar

Icy conditions? Not even once! Never ever use the jake break on ice! Slow and smooth is the key to running on ice. Super smooth shifts and the same goes for breaking.

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