One Year Later

Topic 24397 | Page 2

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NeeklODN's Comment
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Hey old school,

I would prefer to be home every night but here's my thought process: local flatbed delivery is paid hourly. Which is great if you breakdown or have a delay. But most days I find myself producing more,faster. So I'm excelling beyond most others at my store. There may be one guy that is able to deliver more product in any given amount of time on average. Most the guys are just flat out lazy or slow. My boss has even mentioned that I'm his best driver. But he hasn't given me a raise 😂. I kind of want something that will reward me based on performance you know? I only made 37,000 in 2018 and that's with a lot of OT. I need to bank for a year or two to set myself up for a nice future/home/family. I'm getting ,old now I'll be 29 this year. 37-40 just isn't enough to be able to do what I want.

I'm confused. I thought you wanted to be a local driver. What has changed, or am I just wrong in my assumption?

Having no OTR experience is gonna be something of a problem, but probably not insurmountable. What is it you want to do? Don't just chase the biggest paycheck. Decide what it is you want and go for it. If you figure out how to excel at what you do, the money will follow.

If I told you flatbed was where the money is would you believe me? I know some young men working on the same account I am who can't seem to make over about 40,000 dollars a year. I make twice that, and have a blast while I'm doing it. You're going to be the one who ultimately determines what you make. You'll be better equipped to make top dollar if you are enjoying what you do.

Success at Trucking is all about what you bring to the table. It really isn't bound up in the type of job you're doing. We've got people in this forum earning top money hauling each of the different types of freight.

Show Me The Money!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Rainy D.'s Comment
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29 is a great age and not old. I have been 29 for the past 15 years. I have been nervous about the big 30, but I am embracing it in the year 2020.

rofl-1.gif

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hey man, have you looked into Cypress? They are a Florida company and I know they have some flatbed drivers that get home most weekends. I would also recommend checking with Maverick and McElroy. I'm just not sure about them hiring from your area. You definitely should check. Both of those companies offer flatbed jobs where you are home most weekends. It all depends on your area, but both of those companies have a great program designed to get their drivers home. Once you learn their system you'll start making great money and still getting a little time at home too.

I've got another idea, but I need to confirm something before I try to share it with you. Let me ask you something. Could you live with going home 2 or 3 days every two weeks? I'm asking because this idea I've got would probably work something like that. It's a great opportunity but I can't see it getting you home every weekend.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

Yes I could live with that for a while until my fiance decides that she wants kids lol. Also, have a wedding/honeymoon planned for October so that may be an issue I just realized.

I've got another idea, but I need to confirm something before I try to share it with you. Let me ask you something. Could you live with going home 2 or 3 days every two weeks? I'm asking because this idea I've got would probably work something like that. It's a great opportunity but I can't see it getting you home every weekend.

Old School's Comment
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I'm going to check into something. Give me a few days and I'll get back to ya on this.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Is there an Averitt terminal near you? The reason I ask is that Averitt does have a flatbed division. The thing is, drivers are required to park their truck at the terminal, so if it's not conveniently located to where you live it would be a pain for the commute back and forth to work.

They're also an excellent company so it's just a thought. My other half drove and trained new flatbedders with Averitt and only left because he moved out of Florida and where he was moving to, the closet terminal was farther than he was willing to drive to work.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

Susan, thanks I'll check into that.

Old school, ok feel free to email me because it comes straight to my phone. akidder0726@gmail.com Thanks!

I'm going to check into something. Give me a few days and I'll get back to ya on this.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Bruce. There are millions of white drivers out there. "Minorities and those with limited opportunities" is a thing of the past pops, just saying. Anyway, if I were you NeekIODN, I'd try to get into ltl somehow. I'll be 29 this year and want to build a nice future for my family. Ltl jobs can be very rewarding once you have seniority built up. It's not uncommon to make 100k+ doing drop and hook no touch.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

What about WalMart? They advertise great pay and they're begging for 900 drivers right now. Just a thought.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

What about WalMart? They advertise great pay and they're begging for 900 drivers right now. Just a thought.

I'm pretty sure their private fleet requires 30 months of safe driving before being eligible for hire.

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