Anyone Go To An Illinois Secretary Of State Location To Complete A Pretrip Test For CDL B (or A)

Topic 24408 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Class B.'s Comment
member avatar

In Elk Grove Village or any other Illinois location? If you have, what is the pre-trip process like for a Class B? Do you walk around the whole vehicle like all these pre-trip videos show? Do they allow you to do your own thing or will they keep stopping you and have you move to other areas of the truck?

Also this is from the Illinois state's official study guide.. Taking the CDL Pre-trip Inspection Test

Class B and C Pre-trip Inspection Test If you are applying for a Class B or C CDL, you will be required to perform a pre-trip inspection in the vehicle you have brought with you for testing. The vehicle must be a representative of the unit you will be driving and must meet the class weight requirements. If the vehicle is an air brake vehicle, you must first pass the Air Brake Knowledge test. You also must have passed all applicable endorsement knowledge tests that pertain to the vehicle you bring in for testing. You will be required to perform one of the three versions of the inspection; you will not know which version until just before testing begins. All of the tests include an engine start and in-cab-inspection. In addition, your test may include an inspection of the entire vehicle or only a portion of the vehicle which your CDL examiner will explain to you. You will have to inspect any special vehicle features, if applicable

What are the three inspections they mention? If you are only required to perform just one, why does it say you might have to inspect the entire vehicle?

Thanks

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

When I took my CDL A test they came to my school and we just sat in the truck and the examiner asked us about various items during for the pretrip. The better you did the less you had to explain.

It maybe different of done at the facility I am not sure.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Sid V.'s Comment
member avatar

I took my class a in Illinois, i forgot which center but it was down by kankakee.

For the pretrip they want you to say specific things that are in the back of the Illinois cdl manual so make sure you know everything there. Then there was the air leakage test inside the cab.

That's for class a, not sure for class b.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Hi Class B, and welcome to the forum.

The pre trip examination will mostly be the same in any state. If Illinois has differences, they'll be subtle and will most likely be simple differences in wording. I'll go through how we did it at Prime in MO, and you can probably count on IL being the same. You should however study the wording for Illinois.

Basically, the pre trip is broken up into 6 segments: The first three are mandatory for every testee.

- In cab inspection and brake test

- Coupling area

- Lights

The following 3 are the areas you refer to in your question above. The examiner can choose to test you in any of the 3 sections, or he/she can randomly make you perform all 3 segments.

- Engine compartment

- Driver door area

- Trailer

You can be required to do all or part of any segment, so you need to be sure to study the entire pre trip. Or you could even get an examiner who just gives you a quick test to see if you know what you're talking about, and skips the rest. You never know.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

My advice? Avoid Illinois at any cost. Up here in Wisconsin we refer to that lowly state as Ill Annoy. I hate the tolls, Chicago and everything about the state. My cousin is from Chicago and I had to take her in because she was destitute. She has a heart of gold, but absolutely no common sense. At least she takes good care of my dog when I'm on the road. Otherwise, Ill Annoy sucks.

Big Scott (CFI Driver/Tra's Comment
member avatar

You are required to do a complete pre trip inspection everyday on your vehicle. Learn the whole thing. They will either have you do the whole truck or a part. Your CDL examiner will let you know which areas they want you to check for the exam. You will have to do the in cab break test in the exact order. Good luck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

In NY, the examiner’s tablet randomly picks what parts you do. It also randomly picks someone to do the whole thing. Because they are so far behind, right now the inspector will reboot the tablet if it asks for a full pretrip.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

For me, the in cab part of the test was the most difficult. The break test is the most critical and as has been stated, has to be done in exact order. But it's not the only part of the in-cab pretest. It takes some real effort in memorization to pass the test, but if this old fart can do it, anybody can.

Steven E.'s Comment
member avatar

Having gone through the process myself to get a Class B, I can say: Study all the parts that pertain to Class B. Don't worry about the sections having to do with trailers or HazMat , unless you are wanting to be a HazMat driver. In my case, the examiner sat in the cab and asked you questions. Be prepared to answer whatever he asks, and - this is important - don't volunteer any information and try to be fancy. Answer the question asked and no more. Simple, straightforward, no elaboration. MAKE SURE you're up to speed on the Air Brakes part. That is the one section you absolutely cannot goof up. That was my experience, for whatever it may be worth.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Class B.'s Comment
member avatar

Appreciate all the responses. I would have preferred to actually do the full walk around and in-cab test without the examiner stopping me. Seems like that would be more likely to throw you off, especially if it feels like the examiner is rushing you.

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More