Newb Questions About CDL Training And Qualifications

Topic 24737 | Page 3

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PackRat's Comment
member avatar

For a non-previous CDL holder, companies will want to know your previous verified 10 years. Key word is verified by those doing your background checks.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

You are going to need recent pay stubs. Perhaps notarized statements ftom friends or family stating what you were doing at the time. My company, Prime, is very picky regarding work history.

Jamie's Comment
member avatar

What sort of work history do I need in order to get past this hurdle?

It just depends which company you go with, because my verifiable work history is very spotty as I did a lot of random freelance programming online, for random people basically. No way to verify it, the only job I was able to verify was my taxi job, and Schneider hired me and paid for my schooling.

Schneider themselves do not have a school, but they partner with certain schools and you'll go there to get your CDLs before going to company training.

So in other words, it just depends on the company. Some are more strict than others.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Lucky Lew's Comment
member avatar

I paid for CDL school in my town. I feel like the school here in Roanoke, Va. is probably better than most, as they would allow you to practice until you felt comfortable going for the DMV test. I was thinking this was a good decision for me as I could go to school locally. If I had a do-over I would go somewhere with company training. Much of the time I spent at school was waiting on my turn to drive or to practice backing, etc. If you like riding in the truck while other students take their turn you can learn some things by watching their mistakes! The equipment for the most part was ten or more years old. I was fortunate that I had an eighteen year work history and no medical issues. I had several offers within days of receiving my CDL. If I was in your shoes I would definitely go for company sponsored training.

.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

This is something i heard from one of my trainees. I was told, "Its like going from a Pinto to a Mercedes."

of course, the youger guys might not know what a Pinto is.

In my company all of the trucks are 2017 and newer. the 2020s are already here. Huge difference from the 2012 I trained on and my student was in a 1999 in CDL school locally.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

I was a student at Sage in Rome, NY.

I decided to pay for my own schooling for one reason and one reason only. The company I wanted to work for, H O Wolding, does not have a paid program. They do have an awesome reimbursement program, and the reason I wanted to work with them was their reputation, home time, the route, and the hourly position in the northeast. I can be home once or twice during the week, and every weekend. I was unable to find more than a handful of complaints about them, and those were mostly people who washed out of training. Even guys who left had nothing but good words for them.

If I were considering any other large company, and you will likely have to start with a large company, as small companies can’t insure a beginner, I would have gone with a paid CDL program.

In your case, my biggest concern is the meds. I had a DOT medical card, but the company sent me to their own doctor, and had she not passed me, I would not be an employee.

As far as being tied to a company, if you are being reimbursed, you are still going to be tied to a company long enough to be reimbursed if you pay. In my case that will be 30 months @ $250/month, so a company paid program might actually be a shorter requirement. And I have seen. companies advertise they will reimburse IF they are your first choice out of school.

Bottom line is, if you go to a company school, you will know upfront, with next to nothing out of pocket, whether you meet their requirements. If you pay for your own, you could be in debt and struggling to get hired.

As far as school quality, CDL schools teach you to get a license. PERIOD. You will not learn much else that will set you apart from anyone else, so get school quality out of your head.

A company paid school is focused on getting you a license AND preparing you to drive for them, AND they are invested in your success.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

For a non-previous CDL holder, companies will want to know your previous verified 10 years. Key word is verified by those doing your background checks.

Actually, I think that is wrong. 10 years for CDL holders with previous driving jobs. 3 years for non CDL holders. 7 years of continuous employment with 2 months off is not a problem.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar
of course, the youger guys might not know what a Pinto is.

What is a Pinto?

smile.gif

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

My work history is not good, I had to provide a letter signed by a non family member saying what I was doing for my unemployment gap.

If you have not had a CDL before they only go back 3 years.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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