Nucor Steel Darlington SC

Topic 24790 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

Holy smokes. Just spent the past 7 hours here. Is it always like this? 1 hour 20 minutes for my first solo tarp though. I think that's pretty good. In the dark too πŸ˜‚

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

I've been to many Nucors, many times. but not that one. Most of them have a little wait, but usually not more than a couple hours.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Holy smokes. Just spent the past 7 hours here.

This is when that split sleeper provision really gives you some assistance. When you get into a situation like this if you'll log your wait time as "sleeper berth," once eight hours has clicked off your clock goes back to exactly the time you had available when you arrived at the shipper. I'll use that strategy at places like this. Even if I was done in seven hours, I'd figure out how to stretch it to eight so my clocks would reset. It basically halts your fourteen hour clock giving you additional time to keep moving.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

βˆ†_Danielsahn_βˆ†'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Holy smokes. Just spent the past 7 hours here.

double-quotes-end.png

This is when that split sleeper provision really gives you some assistance. When you get into a situation like this if you'll log your wait time as "sleeper berth," once eight hours has clicked off your clock goes back to exactly the time you had available when you arrived at the shipper. I'll use that strategy at places like this. Even if I was done in seven hours, I'd figure out how to stretch it to eight so my clocks would reset. It basically halts your fourteen hour clock giving you additional time to keep moving.

The only issue is, some companies (like mine) don't allow you to go back and edit your logs like that. And you cannot predict that you will be there, that long, to go into sleeper, once you get there. Personally, I like it that way, because it has made me a lot more mindful about how I log and notate my hours.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar
The only issue is, some companies (like mine) don't allow you to go back and edit your logs like that. And you cannot predict that you will be there, that long, to go into sleeper, once you get there

I haven't dealt with sleeper so I'm clueless about it. Couldn't you just always log yourself into sleeper instead of OFF DUTY when you're loading or unloading and have it not affect your 70? I was under the impression its recommended to do that always just in case it does end up being like this occurrence where it takes much longer. Even if you don't spend the 8 hours in sleeper it doesnt affect you any differently than if you had logged it off duty.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
The only issue is, some companies (like mine) don't allow you to go back and edit your logs like that. And you cannot predict that you will be there, that long, to go into sleeper, once you get there. Personally, I like it that way, because it has made me a lot more mindful about how I log and notate my hours.

I never indicated that he would need to edit his logs.

Danielsahn, I wouldn't need to edit my logs in this situation. I'd check in with the customer while logged on duty. Then after about fifteen minutes I'd switch myself to sleeper berth making a note that I'm waiting on the customer. If I'm only there one hour, no big deal - I roll out. If I'm there eight hours, I get to take advantage of a perfectly legal provision that helps me be more efficient.

Logging sleeper berth while waiting is a habit of mine - it doesn't matter if I'm only waiting twenty minutes. It has made a huge difference in conserving my seventy hour clock and increasing my income.

I've had many inspections of my logs. No one has ever questioned this practice. I'm not saying no one ever will, but it sure has made a huge difference in my results. Recently the operations manager over our dedicated account paid me this compliment... "Nobody works their clock like you do."

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

βˆ†_Danielsahn_βˆ†'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

The only issue is, some companies (like mine) don't allow you to go back and edit your logs like that. And you cannot predict that you will be there, that long, to go into sleeper, once you get there

double-quotes-end.png

I haven't dealt with sleeper so I'm clueless about it. Couldn't you just always log yourself into sleeper instead of OFF DUTY when you're loading or unloading and have it not affect your 70? I was under the impression its recommended to do that always just in case it does end up being like this occurrence where it takes much longer. Even if you don't spend the 8 hours in sleeper it doesnt affect you any differently than if you had logged it off duty.

If the DOT officer that "had a bad day" audits your logs, they can, and have, dinged many drivers for falsifying logs, because of these details. If your sitting in the driver's or passenger seat, and, are logged in the sleeper, for instance. Always log it as you do it. So change from sleeper to off duty if you need to run inside, and then back to sleeper when you get back. Logging off duty, or sleeper will save your 70.

A split sleeper is a great tool, to use, although it's not always an option.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

Can they prove you weren’t in your Sleeper the whole time you were at a customer? I doubt they could. So even if they tried I would just fight it.

βˆ†_Danielsahn_βˆ†'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

The only issue is, some companies (like mine) don't allow you to go back and edit your logs like that. And you cannot predict that you will be there, that long, to go into sleeper, once you get there. Personally, I like it that way, because it has made me a lot more mindful about how I log and notate my hours.

double-quotes-end.png

I never indicated that he would need to edit his logs.

Danielsahn, I wouldn't need to edit my logs in this situation. I'd check in with the customer while logged on duty. Then after about fifteen minutes I'd switch myself to sleeper berth making a note that I'm waiting on the customer. If I'm only there one hour, no big deal - I roll out. If I'm there eight hours, I get to take advantage of a perfectly legal provision that helps me be more efficient.

Logging sleeper berth while waiting is a habit of mine - it doesn't matter if I'm only waiting twenty minutes. It has made a huge difference in conserving my seventy hour clock and increasing my income.

I've had many inspections of my logs. No one has ever questioned this practice. I'm not saying no one ever will, but it sure has made a huge difference in my results. Recently the operations manager over our dedicated account paid me this compliment... "Nobody works their clock like you do."

I misunderstood what you were saying, originally. That definitely clarifies things. I also had not considered doing it that way, before. Although I am sure you have mentioned it in other threads. Glad it was brought back up.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Jamie's Comment
member avatar

I keep seeing people talk about the 8/2 sleeper split, I'm.nkt entirely sure if I'm "allowed" to do it since I read on the Schneider site that "DOT requires a full 10 hour break continuously" or something like that. So I haven't tried it, but have noticed my hours coming back after 8 hours in the sleeper and like today would have helped me make my appointment better instead of waiting a full 10 hours.

Was it "banned" and then allowed again at some point?

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More