Wasted Day

Topic 24898 | Page 2

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Turtle's Comment
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You know, doing 8hrs is the sleeper isn't actually a split. It's the 8 hr sleeper berth provision that simply pauses your clock, which is a separate thing from a 8/2 split. You don't have to do a split to take advantage of the 8hr provision.

Your company may not allow the split, but it seems crazy that they wouldn't allow the 8hrs.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Jamie's Comment
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You know, doing 8hrs is the sleeper isn't actually a split. It's the 8 hr sleeper berth provision that simply pauses your clock, which is a separate thing from a 8/2 split. You don't have to do a split to take advantage of the 8hr provision.

Your company may not allow the split, but it seems crazy that they wouldn't allow the 8hrs.

Didn't know that. However he specifically said Schneider requires drivers to take a 10 hour break either off duty or in the sleeper status.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Jamie, you're doing the right thing by bringing these situations here and letting us help you work through them with your company. Hang in there, and don't get discouraged!!! This stuff is totally normal.

What you're going through now is the exact same thing that every new driver goes through in the beginning. It's easy to see why the Web is overloaded with thousands and thousands of videos and forum posts from brand new drivers saying, "I quit my job because this company sucks!!!"

Yet you come here and you find that all of our experienced drivers are thrilled to death with their companies and they're not having nearly as many problems as new drivers seem to have.

Trust me, you're going to work through this kind of stuff and before long you'll have a better understanding of your company and the industry. You'll form great relationships with the people at your company and you'll be getting huge miles and all sorts of special favors, just like the experienced drivers here are getting.

Stay the course and stay positive. Being new to anything is always a bumpy road and a clumsy process in the beginning. This is the point where people who are not committed to success quit their job and start making "my company sucks" videos. If you'll stick with it and keep working through it one day at a time you'll come out on top and you'll have it made.

smile.gif

RealDiehl's Comment
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It's because of stuff like this (name tag from our annual awards event this year) that I can *almost* do whatever I want.. our company policies are easy to comply with lol. They treat me very very well.

0407069001552508011.jpg

You obviously deserve the respect you've earned. I hope it rubs off on your students...and maybe on some motivated forum members getting ready to go solo too!

Jamie's Comment
member avatar

Finally delivered the load, wasn't even late. Barely made it within my appointment window. On the bright side, they offer parking at the customer which has been rare for me. In an area with little parking for trucks, one less thing to worry about. Besides if I wake up having to use the restroom really bad. good-luck-2.gifrofl-3.gif

Not letting the slow day get to me either, I don't always expect to have good days everyday or even week. I understand things happen, depends on the area you're in and things along those lines. Just part of the job!

I wasn't even mad at the shipper , I asked twice during the 7 and a half hours when my load might be done and did so politely and professionally. Then I waited in my truck until they came and got me(we had to disconnect from the trailer and park elsewhere). I get paid detention pay so that's better then making nothing. rofl-3.gif

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

It's because of stuff like this (name tag from our annual awards event this year) that I can *almost* do whatever I want.. our company policies are easy to comply with lol. They treat me very very well.

0407069001552508011.jpg

SWEET!

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Jamie, I don’t know if this helps, but I had a terrible day today also. Worked almost 14 hrs on the clock but I had “other” work to do so I really put in 15 hours. And my driving miles only came up to 220. Many of the same issues you dealt with. ( one good thing, when I stopped for fuel I found a shiny new quarter on the ground).

But I loved the problem solving that came with today’s work. I could have made as much money today if I worked at McDonald’s, but still the day was challenging and interesting, also a bit frustrating.

Schneider can really put us through the ringer with all the stuff they want us to do but anytime I have a problem they are there to help me, if I can’t solve it on my own.

I love driving a truck. I’m sure I wouldn’t enjoy working at McDonald’s

Junkyard Dog's Comment
member avatar

Sometimes there are loads that somebody just has to do. I was in Cheyenne a few months ago and after I dropped off at the Walmart DC I get the pre-plan to go to Navajo (we have an agreement that our drivers can park for the night and we also have trailers there really handy cuz there's hardly any parking in Denver and they do the same in Kansas City at our terminal) inDenver pick up a trailer and take it to Budweiser a total of 10 MI. I thought what the hell? We had a driver break down, his truck wasn't going to be done for a couple days and the load had to be delivered. My dispatcher called me right after I got the pre-plan and told me what was going on I think I got like 90 miles empty plus the 10 miles and sat for four hours waiting for it to get unloaded. But I know he would take care of me in the end and he did. A run to Macon Georgia and then one to Tolleson Arizona. Ended up being a really good week.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Don's Comment
member avatar

My company does not give us routes or route suggestions, so we drivers take the route we choose. I almost always take the fastest route. Sometimes it may add 10-15 miles, but will knock off 30 minutes of actual drive time, and time is money. The company pays a.specific .cpm for that delivery, so going the longer but faster route may slightly decrease the actual .cpm, but I get back to the home base and pick up my next load faster also. Evens out eventually. They only care about us getting the load to our consignee on time and safely.

Not saying it's a bad company, but this has been my only company, and I suppose I'm a little spoiled. I do what I want. For example, my current load, I didn't like the route suggestion, so I'm having trainee go a different route. As long as we are where we are supposed to be when we're supposed to be there, they leave us alone. No handholding or babysitting.. just get the job done on time or early. Haven't talked to my dispatcher in over 2 weeks, but I did message him a joke earlier today and said hi.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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