Regrets

Topic 24967 | Page 3

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Kim T.'s Comment
member avatar

LOL I know what you meant. For the new drivers I wish there had been a camera crew with you your first year. “Rainy’s First Year.” That would have probably been the best reality show in history.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

The best thing I can do is throw my hat in the ring to say that Old School has already spoken my mind perfectly:

All of us were surprised when you quit abruptly. We supported you, but secretly were disappointed. You hadn't done what we teach all the time - to stick it out for one year. That commitment makes such a difference. It is just that - a commitment. I would always rather see a new driver decide to quit after that trying first year, than immediately following their training time. There is a world of difference in their vantage point and their enjoyment of this career at that point.

One thing we really pride ourselves in here at Trucking Truth is teaching people what they need to know to survive and then thrive in this industry, and the most important lessons we teach have nothing to do with driving the truck. They're about attitude, expectations, and commitment.

It takes a full year in this industry to learn how to handle that rig, develop strong relationships within your company, prove yourself as a driver so you'll get the best opportunities, and adapt to life on the road. You can't possibly know if trucking is right for you until you're capable of doing the job well and you've adapted to it fully in mind, body, and skillset.

My mantra was summed up perfectly in a movie once - your heart is free, have the courage to follow it.

Most people seek security in their lives. In many ways we're taught to do that, mostly by people who never had the courage to pursue adventure or the wisdom that comes from it.

Trucking is an adventure. It takes a lot of courage, ambition, and nerve to pursue this career.

I think the most important decision you have to make is whether you want to pursue adventure or security, and why. Because no matter what path you take you're going to have hard days and the only way to push through and keep up the fight is to know why you're doing it.

You're jumping back and forth between two vastly different careers and lifestyles, so it stands to reason that you don't know what you're pursuing, or why. Until you figure that out you won't know what to do, nor will you have any fulfillment from your life.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

It’s amazing to me how “predictive” the gospel of trucking is as preached here by the seasoned people. All the stages of driving are predicted and I not only see myself reaching these stages but I also am prepared for what is to come and better able to deal with it as things unfold.

As emphasized in this thread the “one year rule” is so true to reality. Knowing this is true really helps us rookies stick to it and power through the tough episodes of our great adventure.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Jeremy's Comment
member avatar

Im not gonna speak morality of the decision you made i have no right there are a few things id say driving regional gets you home every weekend that being said at least for northeast regional id say having some experience under your belt is important poor weather very busy highways and the toughest parking ive seen in the country ive driven in (i havnt drove further west than chicagoish). And in your defense having a stepdaughter working for prime im personally not a fan of their training program ive taught my stepdaughter more over the phone than her trainer did even though she is doin pretty good solo i still think the team training is a disservice to the trainee it seemed to me rather than learning from an experienced driver she drove like she was solo with someone that slept in the bunk im not attacking prime cause i know alot of companies train this way i just dont think its best for the driver rather it works best for the company just my opinion My poont is maybe you didnt learn enough while training due to this which may have led to your complete blindness when you went solo i know my stepdaughter is a tough 21 yr old but if she didnt have me to calm her down and help her im not sure if she woulda made it. Maybe a company that doesnt train in this fashion would get ya where your more comfortable good luck

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

Kim, you might try Schneider. They had dedicated out of Washington Courthouse, OH that delivers to Walmart stores in WV. Also they used to (not sure if they still do) have a Target dedicated out of Stuart’s Draft, VA (near Charlottesville).

On the other hand; if you can afford it and your current pay will support it, maybe get yourself a small camper and start taking weekend trips. The weather is just about here for that.

Good luck.

Kim T.'s Comment
member avatar

To reiterate what I was trying to say in my first post...I realize I should have stuck it out the first year. That is one of the main things I am kicking myself about now. I gave up too soon. That is my big regret. I’ve wanted to drive a truck since I was 6 years old. That’s 50 years! And I gave up. I am a very determined woman, and if you read any of my posts about my health scare that happened almost two years ago you will see that determination. But I lost sight of that determination. That’s what disappoints me about my decision. I’m trying to fight back from that and see what my options are.

I see several have commented and I will respond to those when I get home from work.

Thank you all for everything...even giving me hell when I need it.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Jeremy, i honestly think it depends on the trainer and the student both. I had a great trainer whose wife wound up in the hospital and he quit to be closer to home. I had another that just wanted to use my hours to make money. They were both lease ops.

When I train, I usually have us stop for sit down meals so i can better explain any issues we need to cover. That way i have the person's full attention. I'm not trying to lecture them while they are driving, when they are concentrating on everything but me.

Teaming on my truck is repetitive to practice everything. However, no trainer is just saying "Drive. I will be back in 10 hours". It doesnt happen like that. They do sit side by side for a certain portion of the day. Each driver is permitted 2 hours of off duty per shift. that means 4 hours of "class time" while the truck is rolling if both can fall into that groove.

I utilize this time to answer any questions that have arisen and discuss trip planning. Time management and trip planning can be hard to understand when teaming because someone always has hours. For this reason I make the students do the routing and tell me when and where o should stop and fuel etc.

On the other hand...not all students are open to new experiences or even to following directions. You can explain over an over and they want to do it their own way. Or they dont ask questions so you aren't sure they understand. I ask "Did i make sense when i explained that?" Or i will ask them questions to determine they retained the information.

We have a forum member who is a dear friend and trains side by side. But his constant "change lanes , where's your blinker, you should have done this" would drive me nuts and make me more nervous. that would have caused me to mess up more.

At a certain point, that trainee is supposed to be running that truck on their own. That trainer should just be a safety net. My trainees went solo and racked up the miles quickly and did well.

Im sorry your stepdaughter's training was left wanting. Every single person's experience will be different, unfortunately. I made a lot of Prime friends in the terminal who helped me which is why i try to help others. So i completely understand both you and what she went through. And its great she has you.... but honestly, no matter which company, you would have been her rock anyway. good going "Dad".

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Jeremy's Comment
member avatar

I get what your sayin for sure and it wasnt a knock on prime in any way hell im the reason she chose prime i guess it was maybe geared towards her particular trainer but at the rnd of the day she is doin pretty good besides her trip planning and def dont have the work as hard as stepdad does but i dont ridicule her for it i just gently tell her if i had 3 more hours to drive i wouldnt worry about parking right now but really she has to do what she is comfortable with and her dispatcher obviously works with her and doesnt push her harder than she can handle but i def come from a different way of thinkin i work my a$$ off and my paychecks have reflected that since day 1 now if you really wanna wish me luck rainy my wife has decided she would like to do this and team with me she is gonna go to school then i get to custom train her my way lol WISH ME LUCK

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Hahaa... i will say a rosary for you and a couple novenas lol (its a catholic thing lol)

really she has to do what she is comfortable with and her dispatcher obviously works with her and doesnt push her harder than she can handle

This is the most important thing right here! She is figuring out what is safe for her, what her body can handle endurance and fatigue and communicating with her FM!!! That is a major accomplishment.

And stop comparing her to you. lol I used to park early too so i didnt hit anyone in a truck stop, sometimes i still do. you just get your hours back earlier so not the end of the world. I refuse to park at Pilot or Loves if I dont feel they have room for me to get out at night without issues. And with reefer , you can't always move up appointments so the rush, rush could be more stress that could cause an accident.

I have 3 hours left on my 70 right now... I am 10 miles from home and cant deliver ir until 2200. :( rushing got me nowhere today lol

im glad she is doing well.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

We have drivers in WVA. Just something to consider. Not sure if they're home weekly or every other.

Regardless, take your time and figure out if you want trucking bad enough.

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