Regrets

Topic 24967 | Page 2

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Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Even though Wolding is 4 weeks out, you might be able to work out more home time after that week. They are pretty flexible.

Navypoppop's Comment
member avatar

Kim,

Take the time to check every option that you might have available. Your heart is telling you to keep trucking so if you explore all job variations you should be able to find one that suits your needs. I too did not like being out on the road for weeks at a time and missed my family too much so the regional opportunities were the answer. Some jobs offer every other night home or out for 2-4 and home for 3. Take your "gut" feeling and be sure which avenue you need to go down to make yourself happy and satisfied or you will regret it later. Good luck.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Kim, this is a great discussion.

You are going through all the tough emotions and adjustments every new truck driver goes through. I find it interesting that you keep mentioning the negatives as being parking difficulties, getting tied up at shippers/receivers, and insufficient home time. For the most part those are rookie issues. Experienced drivers seldom have those issues because they know how to capitalize on them, and use their knowledge and street smarts to turn what rookies consider as obstacles, into opportunities to get more accomplished.

All of us were surprised when you quit abruptly. We supported you, but secretly were disappointed. You hadn't done what we teach all the time - to stick it out for one year. That commitment makes such a difference. It is just that - a commitment. I would always rather see a new driver decide to quit after that trying first year, than immediately following their training time. There is a world of difference in their vantage point and their enjoyment of this career at that point.

I'm glad you're still considering this, but I would also recommend that you strongly consider that one year commitment also. You may very well decide to get back to a terribly boring office job, but you'll have such a greater vantage point to base your decision on after gaining some valuable experience. Trucking is tough, especially getting started in it. I love what I do, but I second guessed myself a thousand times during that training period and rookie year. There's no looking back for me now. I'm "all in." There's plenty of others like me in here, and we would be more than happy to help you and give support and advice whenever you ask us.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Kim T.'s Comment
member avatar

Grumpy, thank you for trying. I will still keep them in mind.

Scott, there wasn’t any certain thing at home, my kids are grown. It’s just that a month is a long time to be gone. Some people love it but I didn’t. You don’t realize how long a month really is until you are out there.

Bruce, I realize it takes a full commitment and that is what I am researching and looking into, especially within myself.

Navy, too bad there isn’t the perfect company out there. It’s like finding the absolutely perfect house but it’s sitting vicariously on a cliff. I will find one that fits closest to what I’m looking for.

Hey Old School! You are exactly right. Those are very rookie issues and I did not give myself time to get through it and learn it. That is what I am regretting the most. That I gave up on me too soon. I walked away from my lifelong dream because I was frustrated. Yes, if I could kick myself in the rear I would. Everyone on here was very supportive, encouraging, and offered great advice and I appreciate all of you more than you know. That’s probably why I’ve come back here looking for input, whether supportive or not.

Thank you drivers!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
jz3377's Comment
member avatar

Kim Everything about your story has been inspirational. I was cheering your victories and suffering your defeats vicariously. Thank you for "putting yourself out there" for all of us. Hope you can find the balance that brings you the most peace.

Kim T.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you so much, jz. This site has been very inspirational, enlightening, and valuable to me. I’m glad I was able to give back a little.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Kim I’m glad your still hanging around and thinking. I too was suprised at your leaving so quickly, however I know you thought you were taking the best course of action for yourself, and do not ever apologize for that. I got into trucking after 1 year of retirement. I had just started a new relationship and it was what we both thought was the best course of action. We had a plan in place which was me too get 2 years exp. and then work locally being gone 3-4 days at a time. The plan worked fine and I landed a great local job doing just what we expected. Then after a year she decided after all that to move on in a different direction. I second guessed things all the way through that 2 years and then some. I gave her a year to figure out what she wanted and it never happened. I finally decided what made me happy the most and just did it. I have not looked back once. Being out a month sucks when you have someone at home. But if you don’t, it really isn’t that big a deal. My kids are all grown. Generally I see or hear from them when the want something. They are all married and have lives they are leading. I come out of the house and just go. If I need to get home I do, otherwise I find ways to enjoy my time were ever I’m at. We live in a beautiful country with alot to offer. I could do regional close to home, but right now I don’t wish too.

You just need to figure out in your own mind and heart what you really want. Then just do it. Don’t question it from that point forward. We can talk ourselves into or out of just about anything if we choose too. By you putting in the effort up front, you don’t need to look back.

I wish you the best whatever you decide to do!!!

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

I think you are a perfectionist and too hard on yourself. Yes, the parking issues get easier, and the time management. The only stress i have is what i put on myself. some people hate change.. ME! me me! part of your frustration was the unknown. One very important thing you said to me, "in the office its the same kind of stress everyday. You know and understand it". ie, you hate change.

I dont know of any regional or dedicated that we have that could get you home more. And most likely Prime would.put you in a lightweight to do it. You said your FM was really understanding. Why not call him and explain. Ask him if there is a route i dont kmow about. He might be able to keep you in the midwest area and get you home a little more often. You never know unless you try.

They would still let you work off the PSD Im sure probably just amend the contract or something.

But honestly, I dont know if you should try coming back until you know you are ready. If you dont like that office then find another one. Don't try to come out here and flip flop. it will.play mental havoc with your mind.

The other possibility.... see if you can find a Prime lease/owner op on a FB group who would allow you to get hone every couple weeks or so. You would remain a Prime company driver with benefits, it would count as time toward your contract, but the truck belongs to the lease op, therefore you can negotiate pay and home time.

there are quite a few out there with more than one truck, or who want to get off the road and need someone to drive their truck for whatever reason. you would still be solo. Worst case scenario, it doesnt work out after a few.months and you go back to a company driver.

if you do that, be sure to get to know the lease op. My best friend who wants another truck and keeps offering me $1500 a week and 3 weeks out, 1 week home. And i would still be Prime with benefits. sounds tempting. But possibily losing my friend over business, and definitely losing my FM (although i would wind up with my former night dispatcher as an FM, so not that much change lol or stress) has kept me from it.

If you think you can hang in there for awhile, since you are such an awesome person, becoming a PSD trainer later down the line might help. They often pick up a student run a bit, get a weekend home them run back to test and get another student. i have a friend that is home every other weekend doing it. He loves teaching and the companionship on the truck, but in PSD sleeping isn't an issue cause you are parked. Of course you need to kaster your own skills and actually want to help people before considering it. but the option is there.

well... good luck. im glad it isn't my decision. Just remember, the grass isnt always greener. Dont mong for one just because you are unhappy in another. maybe you just need to change positions in an office and rent an SUV once a year and be Clark Griswold.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.
Kim T.'s Comment
member avatar

PJ, I’ve always wanted to get my CDL and drive a truck. I did that. When I decided to walk away and come back home I truly thought what I had accomplished would be enough to satisfy that dream. I’m finding out that it’s not. I’m working my way through the rest of it. I will eventually figure it out. I thought a long time before finally deciding to get my CDL and I will be thinking long and hard this time too. Thank you.

Rainy, Clark Griswold?? LOL I’m not a major screwup...I don’t think. Once again you have given me a lot to think about. I appreciate you and your advice more than you will ever know. I have thought about the PSD training but I have to get to that point first. I will also think about your other suggestions. I miss you lady! Thank you.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.
Rainy 's Comment
member avatar
Rainy, Clark Griswold?? LOL I’m not a major screwup

thats not what i meant...but if you had seen me on the road my first couple months solo, you would swear i was his twin sister!!!!

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