I Need Help - Not Getting Enough Miles

Topic 25539 | Page 3

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NeeklODN's Comment
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No response andhe?

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Sure, but you’re not gonna like it. Instead of wishing for loads you don’t have, figure out how to make the ones you do have, work. Ten weeks is not enough time to reach expert level in clock manipulation, load schedule manipulation, loading speed (don’t show up at noon for example), or even tarping/securement. A bad day for me is anything less than 550 miles and three stops (loading/unloading.) Your problem is as simple as the 350 miles a day with only two stops.

To correct your assumptions, my loads include dh miles. 307 means 3k miles this week with ten loads (eight tarped), which also means some days with two loads and two unloads.

I promise I will never get my feelings hurt on the internet. Scouts honor. I'm just trying to figure out what I'm doing differently than you so I can fix it if need be. I've followed everyone's advice here, including yours about the tiered cargo and belly straps. I'm not seeing anything you're saying that I'm not doing.....tell me if I'm wrong.

Ok could you tell me how you are getting two loads a day? I've been able to do that sometimes but for example my receiver for tomorrow morning is 7:00-1400. Hopefully be unloaded by 730-800 and hopefully be sent a new load shortly after. Assuming it takes an hour and a half to deadhead to my next pickup, that's 9:30. Optimistically loaded and ready to roll by 11:00. (Which never happens due to wait times) what only leaves 3 hours to make a third stop for the day. So you're basically saying that your loads are all that short?

ahh just realized something else....you're not home on the weekends are you? I only run 5 days a week. Do you run all 7?

There must be a severe disconnect in my brain right now because I just don't get how that is possible every day.

I'm only getting 350 a day because that's all I'm Given....I always run it as fast as I can and always have time on my 11 and 14.....I'm missing something here.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

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No response andhe?

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Sure, but you’re not gonna like it. Instead of wishing for loads you don’t have, figure out how to make the ones you do have, work. Ten weeks is not enough time to reach expert level in clock manipulation, load schedule manipulation, loading speed (don’t show up at noon for example), or even tarping/securement. A bad day for me is anything less than 550 miles and three stops (loading/unloading.) Your problem is as simple as the 350 miles a day with only two stops.

To correct your assumptions, my loads include dh miles. 307 means 3k miles this week with ten loads (eight tarped), which also means some days with two loads and two unloads.

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I average 2 loads per week, sometimes 3. My average length of haul for the last 6 weeks is 1,108 miles. 4 tarped loads, 3 Permitted loads, two 2stop loads and a partridge in a pear tree. But I am otr , not regional.

Phew that sounds nice right about now. Thanks for the reply.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

Forgot to mention that I always start my day as soon as I have 10 hours off duty. Not 11....10. I'm always at the shipper receiver as soon as humanly possible. I'm really busting my butt out here. Am I a seasoned veteran? No, obviously not. I'm just not understanding how I can do more with what I'm being given. Day 1 unload and reload...day 2 repeat. 2 stops per day. I don't see any way to be efficient enough to jump the cycle and get three stops per day when I'm already pushing the very edges of the box....educate me.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey neek, I'm a little late to the thread but signed in to add to this. There are several reasons why you and andhe are having different experiences. For one, if I'm not mistaken he has more experience. Over time, you learn different techniques to get better at the game. I believe andhe is still with maverick? When I left, I had it down to a science almost. I knew the shippers and receivers, which ones allowed early delivery/drop offs, which ones allowed parking over night etc. These are things than can help you be more efficient. But even if you do everything right, you can only do so much with what they give you. I don't know how your company works, but maverick has tons of customers all over the place. I had several 3k plus miles as a regional driver. I'm sure your company wants you to run miles, but it's possible the freight they're running and how they're running it is profitable for them. That's all that matters to them at the end of the day. The best thing you can do, and you already got on it, is to communicate. Maybe even talk to more experienced drivers at the company for some insight.

Also, where are you located? Florida maybe? That may be a factor if that's where the company is based.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

Neek, I know you have a huge weight on your head. It is a tough decision. I must agree that 10 weeks solo is not enough to prove yourself. How can you manage your clock better? Are you paid the same for deadhead , loaded and bobtail miles? As was said, learning the customer's will help greatly. Old School gets to know the forklift drivers and treats them great. He has some of their phone numbers and will call them with an ETA. This is one trick he uses to get unloaded quicker. These guys loading and unloading you are paid very little for their hard work.

As you know I haul dry van and usually get plenty of miles. Today, I'm picking up a loaded trailer in Eastern North Carolina and taking to NJ by tomorrow. I won't be able to get there today, so I will get as close as I can. As soon as I know how early I will be there I will let my FM know so he can work on my next load for me.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

Hey neek, I'm a little late to the thread but signed in to add to this. There are several reasons why you and andhe are having different experiences. For one, if I'm not mistaken he has more experience. Over time, you learn different techniques to get better at the game. I believe andhe is still with maverick? When I left, I had it down to a science almost. I knew the shippers and receivers, which ones allowed early delivery/drop offs, which ones allowed parking over night etc. These are things than can help you be more efficient. But even if you do everything right, you can only do so much with what they give you. I don't know how your company works, but maverick has tons of customers all over the place. I had several 3k plus miles as a regional driver. I'm sure your company wants you to run miles, but it's possible the freight they're running and how they're running it is profitable for them. That's all that matters to them at the end of the day. The best thing you can do, and you already got on it, is to communicate. Maybe even talk to more experienced drivers at the company for some insight.

Also, where are you located? Florida maybe? That may be a factor if that's where the company is based.

Interesting outlook on the situation thanks. I live in NW Florida, but the company is from Dothan AL.

Neek, I know you have a huge weight on your head. It is a tough decision. I must agree that 10 weeks solo is not enough to prove yourself. How can you manage your clock better? Are you paid the same for deadhead , loaded and bobtail miles? As was said, learning the customer's will help greatly. Old School gets to know the forklift drivers and treats them great. He has some of their phone numbers and will call them with an ETA. This is one trick he uses to get unloaded quicker. These guys loading and unloading you are paid very little for their hard work.

As you know I haul dry van and usually get plenty of miles. Today, I'm picking up a loaded trailer in Eastern North Carolina and taking to NJ by tomorrow. I won't be able to get there today, so I will get as close as I can. As soon as I know how early I will be there I will let my FM know so he can work on my next load for me.

Yeah I guess I'm just going to stick it out longer. Yes I'm paid the same for all miles. But it's a sliding scale depending on how many total miles for the week.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Jeremy's Comment
member avatar

I know everyone here has there own opinions here and i dont know much about regional work in that area but i know for a fact i would never ever stay away from my family to gross 7-800$ i have driven northeast regional dry van/reefer with the occasional flatbed if needed and from week one ive never grossed less than 1000 and actually grossing 1000$ only happens if i take a day off or have a breakdown i do however average 3000 miles a week just my perspective on the situation

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar
Phew that sounds nice right about now. Thanks for the reply.

I totally didn't finish my thought out. Sorry if it sounded like bragging.

I had to work my bum off, to get to these longer loads. And while I am happy in my current situation, I know that I can do better. I am working towards our SSD fleet, but I know I have a ways to go.

You seem to be doing everything right. Your FM might be seeing if you can maintain your rhythm, and your good runs are just around the corner. Reach out, and ask if they see anything you can improve on.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

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Phew that sounds nice right about now. Thanks for the reply.

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I totally didn't finish my thought out. Sorry if it sounded like bragging.

I had to work my bum off, to get to these longer loads. And while I am happy in my current situation, I know that I can do better. I am working towards our SSD fleet, but I know I have a ways to go.

You seem to be doing everything right. Your FM might be seeing if you can maintain your rhythm, and your good runs are just around the corner. Reach out, and ask if they see anything you can improve on.

It's cool I didn't think you were bragging. But here's a perfect example of what I'm talking about.

Rolled in the gates at a receiver at 0700 when they opened. Had two guys in front of me even though I got there the night before. Empty call at 08:30. Sent a load ten minutes later. 110 MT miles and 265 loaded. Receiving hours are 0800-1600. Arrived at shipper at 10:35. I'm loaded and tarped under a load of bricks now. I've taken this load before and it takes at least 5 hours.

How could I POSSIBLY do more miles today?????

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

Loaded time was 12:05 p.m.

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