I Need Help - Not Getting Enough Miles

Topic 25539 | Page 4

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NeeklODN's Comment
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I know everyone here has there own opinions here and i dont know much about regional work in that area but i know for a fact i would never ever stay away from my family to gross 7-800$ i have driven northeast regional dry van/reefer with the occasional flatbed if needed and from week one ive never grossed less than 1000 and actually grossing 1000$ only happens if i take a day off or have a breakdown i do however average 3000 miles a week just my perspective on the situation

Yeah I'm kinda feeling that way. It's tough. Trying to make myself focus on future potential.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Bruce K.'s Comment
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Neek, I think you left out an important detail: When you arrived at the shipper is not as important as when you started your 14 hour clock. When was that? That would determine if you have any time left after you deliver the bricks to make headway towards your next pick up. If I understand correctly, you will deliver the bricks no sooner that 17:00. Then unload time comes into play. Will you have any time left on your clock to drive after that?

So, when did you start the 14 hour clock?

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

Neek, I think you left out an important detail: When you arrived at the shipper is not as important as when you started your 14 hour clock. When was that? That would determine if you have any time left after you deliver the bricks to make headway towards your next pick up. If I understand correctly, you will deliver the bricks no sooner that 17:00. Then unload time comes into play. Will you have any time left on your clock to drive after that?

So, when did you start the 14 hour clock?

Yes Bruce you're right. I started my 14 and did pretrip as I was waiting to be unloaded. But here's the thing. I can't deliver these bricks at 1700. The cutoff is 1600 and even so everyone in the home office leaves at 1700. No night dispatch.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

PackRat's Comment
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Have you talked with other drivers at your company about their miles, waiting on loads, money, and downtime?

NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

Have you talked with other drivers at your company about their miles, waiting on loads, money, and downtime?

No not yet

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Oh, okay. Sounds like you can't get any more miles beyond the current delivery unless you can invoke the FM rules. (Freaking Magic). I guess you have to get there and park and start your 10 hr. DOT asap so you can get going as early as possible tomorrow.

Not totally related to you, but just a general comment. (And I know I may get chastised for this). I developed a practice of doing my pre-trip before I started my 14 hr. clock. With my company, I need to log in at least 5 minutes for a pre-trip or any duty change. So, I would start my clock on pre-trip, wait an excruciatingly long 5 minutes, then start driving. I was never questioned on why my pre-trips only took 5 minutes every day. If I had been, I would have just told the truth and I figured the worse that could happen is that I would be told not to do that anymore. I don't want to encourage any bad habits, but that is what I did to squeeze a little more time out of my clock. Whether that's a common practice, I don't know.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Jamie's Comment
member avatar

Oh, okay. Sounds like you can't get any more miles beyond the current delivery unless you can invoke the FM rules. (Freaking Magic). I guess you have to get there and park and start your 10 hr. DOT asap so you can get going as early as possible tomorrow.

Not totally related to you, but just a general comment. (And I know I may get chastised for this). I developed a practice of doing my pre-trip before I started my 14 hr. clock. With my company, I need to log in at least 5 minutes for a pre-trip or any duty change. So, I would start my clock on pre-trip, wait an excruciatingly long 5 minutes, then start driving. I was never questioned on why my pre-trips only took 5 minutes every day. If I had been, I would have just told the truth and I figured the worse that could happen is that I would be told not to do that anymore. I don't want to encourage any bad habits, but that is what I did to squeeze a little more time out of my clock. Whether that's a common practice, I don't know.

You need to log a minimum of 15 minutes to be DOT compliant otherwise it's a log violation.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Jamie, are you sure? My trainer told me 5 minutes. I've only been doing it for a short time but he's been doing it for 20+ years.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

I've heard conflicting information. Is a 15 minutes pre/post trip REQUIRED by DOT? I know that by moving the vehicle you're saying the vehicle is free of defects and take responsibility if it isn't. My company only requires us to log 8 minutes.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Cwc's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Have you talked with other drivers at your company about their miles, waiting on loads, money, and downtime?

double-quotes-end.png

No not yet

Packrat might be onto something. If the company works a small area as a business model then you may have problems getting longer loads. Mix that with no preplans and...

I worked for a company for some time and kinda noticed the same thing you have. Then I spoke to a few drivers and told them what I made at the company I worked at prior and most were like "not making that here"

That company had perks other than 💸. They ran in a great area ,had nice equipment. But... I was after cash.

At least if you speak to other drivers you'll know where you stand. It kinda seems like your racking your brain to find out what you may or may not be doing wrong.

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