What Are The Best Truck Stops, And Why?

Topic 25582 | Page 2

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Robsteeler's Comment
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Nose in. Oh, dear God I learned my lesson on that. Took me 30 minutes of sweating (which was hard because there was a foot of snow on the ground), cursing, and getting out a looking CONSTANTLY. I kept sliding in the snow, and some nice gentleman made his own spot close to the back of the trailer. There was tons of room and no spot behind me, I was tired, and just pulled in and went to sleep. Fun times, but I made it out without hitting anything. I won't nose in again!

andhe78's Comment
member avatar

It’s funny, when I first started, the most important thing when parking was finding a space that I didn’t have to back into, which meant a ton of rest areas. After a few months, the most important thing was a shower every night which meant one of the major truck stops every night. Now days, the most important thing is miles/clock efficiency, so I’ll park in any legal spot that lets me get the most out of my clock.

I do prefer a flying j or large pilot for my 34’s, can use points for laundry at most of them.

Jim S.'s Comment
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Do your companies pay for the truck stops? Do any of you use company terminals? It seems that company terminals might be accommodating. I have heard that some of them have free showers and laundry. I guess that the only thing missing might be truck stop food. But, you would have to eat you own food prepared in you rig, and therefore have a fatter wallet and thinner waistline.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Jim S.'s Comment
member avatar

Nose in. Oh, dear God I learned my lesson on that. Took me 30 minutes of sweating (which was hard because there was a foot of snow on the ground), cursing, and getting out a looking CONSTANTLY. I kept sliding in the snow, and some nice gentleman made his own spot close to the back of the trailer. There was tons of room and no spot behind me, I was tired, and just pulled in and went to sleep. Fun times, but I made it out without hitting anything. I won't nose in again!

I think some of the nose ins might be those that have just run out their clock and need to park in a hurry.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar
I think some of the nose ins might be those that have just run out their clock and need to park in a hurry.

What I've done (not saying its acceptable) if I'm trying to conserve drive time whether I think I'll go over my 11 or I'm about to go over 14 is come to a stop before backing in and put myself on duty, then back in. Different companies have a different threshold before it kicks you to drive, I believe mine is 1 consecutive mile regardless of speed. I've only done this a couple times. Once when weather wasnt Ideal and had a 678 mile route I did it as I pulled into each store I delivered, then did it as i waited for the light to turn green to turn into our terminal. Sometimes drivers nose in because they SHOULD have plenty of room behind them and/or want quiet from other trucks/reefers idling especially if they're taking a 34 reset.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I normally go off duty as soon as I get to the stop light at the end of the exit ramp, or no later than when I pull into the truck stop lot. Occasionally, at the wrong time, it has taken me up to a half hour to be parked in a spot. I don’t want to burn up all that time on my clock.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

"I think some of the nose ins might be those that have just run out their clock and need to park in a hurry."

Not true at all. First if you are running that tight, you need to re-evaluate your trip planning. Second, once you are at the truck stop, you are home free. Just go on your 10 hr break or sleeper berth and move slowly. No need to rush in nose first. That's when accidents happen, when drivers panic and get in a rush.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Jim S thinks...

I think some of the nose ins might be those that have just run out their clock and need to park in a hurry.

No offense Jim, you’ve never done this. Although it would seem there is logic to your point, I suggest it’s only because of your current perception.

In actuality, many times it takes far more time to nose-in and is actually riskier than backing. I’ve seen it many, many times; a driver attempting to nose-in, clips the end of a truck with the blind-side corner of their trailer.

It can also present a much bigger problem when trying to back-out of the hole nosed-into. Granted there are spots designed for a nose-in, and it’s obvious like the PA turnpike rest stops or many rest stops in the interstates.

Contrary to what you currently think; nosing-in is usually because the driver lacks confidence and/or experience with their backing skills.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rubber Duck's Comment
member avatar

Milton PA Flying J. Best salad bar on I-80.

Jim S.'s Comment
member avatar

"I think some of the nose ins might be those that have just run out their clock and need to park in a hurry."

Not true at all. First if you are running that tight, you need to re-evaluate your trip planning. Second, once you are at the truck stop, you are home free. Just go on your 10 hr break or sleeper berth and move slowly. No need to rush in nose first. That's when accidents happen, when drivers panic and get in a rush.

I am still trying to understand the 10/14. Is it ok to go on your 10 while you are moving slowly and travel less than one mile. If you are in line for fuel more than 30 minutes, are you allowed to count that as your 30 minute break even though you drive just a little in the line? What about waiting long times to load or unload? There are some that will say that during those times, you are still responsible for your load.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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