Terminated By Schneider

Topic 25614 | Page 2

Page 2 of 10 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Christian, of all the critical events registered by Schneider, how many would you say were false positives and how many would you say were your fault?

Old School's Comment
member avatar

I think what is going on here is a common scenario where a rookie driver doesn't know how to handle the communications necessary to resolve their trucking related issues.

It appears the only people he ever communicated with was his DBL, and some low level shop personnel. Anyone having issues with critical events should be in immediate consultation with the company/terminal safety director.

For any experienced driver reading this it makes no sense. It appears the driver is leaving something out, or is clueless. Also when something like this gets elevated to the level of receiving notifications of it's severity, then you need to forget about phone calls and communicate with your Quallcomm. That way there's no "he said, she said." Everything said is on record.

I've only had a few minor critical events in my career, but they were always dealt with by "safety personnel." If my driver manager was involved I didn't know of it.

This is how so much trash talk ends up on the internet slandering trucking companies. It's typically new drivers who don't understand how to resolve their issues who end up laboring over which companies are good as opposed to those who are bad. We've been running this forum for years, and we've never seen anything like this situation which has convinced Christian that Schneider is a bull***t company.

Christian, whatever was going on, it just wasn't handled properly by you. As soon as I received that "CTE" you mentioned, I would have parked at a terminal , presented it to the safety manager, explained what's happening, and asked for help resolving the issue. As you've presented the facts it sounds as if your DBL was intent on removing you from his board, and did it expeditiously. The big question for us is the same one that should be bothering you... Why?

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Christian T.'s Comment
member avatar

Christian, of all the critical events registered by Schneider, how many would you say were false positives and how many would you say were your fault?

That’s the conundrum. It’s impossible to determine that, really, which is essentially why they had to term me, in their words. There were simply too many, whether or not I was responsible for all or any of them. If you consider that I drove for 6 months with only one critical event...I don’t know to what extent I can even be held responsible for suddenly accumulating 17 in 2 months. Considering that I was never even at once remotely at risk of a rollover, are any my fault? I need to reiterate that these events were often being triggered on straight roads. It was impossible for to rectify my “dangerous driving behavior” when it was never established what behaviors were triggering these events.

It’s hard for anyone here to understand this situation if you have the shared traditional experience with the ESC system and how it operates, because these events are not easy to trigger, which was also my experience before I got this 2019 Freightliner. My driving habits did not change, yet I suddenly got stability controls left and right, and I couldn’t adjust my driving because it was never clear what was triggering those events. if there was a clear pattern, I could have easily learned and adapted.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jamie's Comment
member avatar
I've only had a few minor critical events in my career, but they were always dealt with by "safety personnel." If my driver manager was involved I didn't know of it.

Schneider handles it a bit differently, you'll talk to your DBL about these events and they'll take your statement and after you have had a few within 30 days, they'll bring you in for extra training and that's where you'll talk to someone from safety, usually have to watch some videos and driving or backing depending on what happened.

Your DBL usually gives you some information on how to prevent them from happening again, if you didn't know what happened. but it's a pretty straight forward process and it doesn't make any sense if he went from having all these events to being fired without ever going through some type of extra training.

Stability Control events are basically the worse you can get, and to get so many so close together is either your own fault or the truck is messed up. But chances are, you were probably doing something that could have triggered it. The new trucks have 2 additional sensors then older Schneider trucks so they are must more sensitive.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Christian T.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I've only had a few minor critical events in my career, but they were always dealt with by "safety personnel." If my driver manager was involved I didn't know of it.

double-quotes-end.png

Schneider handles it a bit differently, you'll talk to your DBL about these events and they'll take your statement and after you have had a few within 30 days, they'll bring you in for extra training and that's where you'll talk to someone from safety, usually have to watch some videos and driving or backing depending on what happened.

Your DBL usually gives you some information on how to prevent them from happening again, if you didn't know what happened. but it's a pretty straight forward process and it doesn't make any sense if he went from having all these events to being fired without ever going through some type of extra training.

Stability Control events are basically the worse you can get, and to get so many so close together is either your own fault or the truck is messed up. But chances are, you were probably doing something that could have triggered it. The new trucks have 2 additional sensors then older Schneider trucks so they are must more sensitive.

this is accurate. I just wasn’t brought in for additional training, the stability control events were being treated as very serious, although nothing was happening, and my understanding from my conversation with my DBL is that my driving was deemed too risky as a result to even be eligible for retraining or taking other steps.

If what you say is true about the sensors, this is where is where I feel blind sided. I was trained and drove on a system For which I was not triggering stability control events. upon getting the new truck, I began triggering these without changing my driving habits and just was not able to adapt. I’m not sure that I was given due process and did not deal with this properly, and now will have to pay for it. That’s a bitter pill to swallow.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

Christian, I for one, believe your story. There is obviously a problem with the computer system/ systems on your truck. I would very calmly and professionally take this up the Chain of Command within the Company. You may not be rehired, ( or want to continue your employment with Schneider), but, it is crucial to resolve this issue, with documentation, as to not hinder your future prospects. Hang in there. There are so many things to deal with as a rookie out here. To put this on top of an already stressful situation is tough. Whatever you do, keep calm, and don't let your emotions get in the way of resolving this.

Christian T.'s Comment
member avatar

Christian, I for one, believe your story. There is obviously a problem with the computer system/ systems on your truck. I would very calmly and professionally take this up the Chain of Command within the Company. You may not be rehired, ( or want to continue your employment with Schneider), but, it is crucial to resolve this issue, with documentation, as to not hinder your future prospects. Hang in there. There are so many things to deal with as a rookie out here. To put this on top of an already stressful situation is tough. Whatever you do, keep calm, and don't let your emotions get in the way of resolving this.

Well I appreciate that sentiment. To the best of my understanding I am accurately representing what happened. I think you have a rookie DBL and a rookie driver in myself both maybe not handling the situation properly. I did not do my part in defending myself, and although I don’t expect to work for Schneider anymore it’s just hard to accept that I might have to suffer down the road for this. I was driving safely and responsibly to the best of my knowledge and ability and I wanted to stop getting those critical events, but I just couldn’t avoid it. The cruise control did not work on the truck initially, for example, and the company did not believe us and the techs found no issue with it until Freightliner sent out a notice to Schneider about it. This could be a similar issue but I cannot confirm that.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

The 17 critical events were all charged to you? How many did your teammate have?

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

I think he said his teammate had 9, if I understood correctly.

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

In my opinion, there is a serious issue with that truck. I have hit some bridge to road way transitions that should have ripped the kingpin right off of the trailer, and didn't trigger an event!

Page 2 of 10 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More