Ozarks

Topic 25624 | Page 1

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NeeklODN's Comment
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If you've never driven an 18-wheeler through the Ozark mountains, at 4 a.m., in the dense fog, then you are probably still alive....lol I LOVE the challenge

Robsteeler's Comment
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Yep, mountains, dense fog, and dark are a scary combination. Even our eastern "tiny" mountains.

Bruce K.'s Comment
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Neek, too bad you couldn't go through there in the daylight, it's a very beautiful scenic drive.

Donna M.'s Comment
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You’re not far from me. But I’m ready to get the heck out of here. There is a forecast for some nasty weather today.

Old School's Comment
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NeeklODN, I run 65 often when I'm heading to one of our customers in Springfield, MO. One of my daughters lives in Branson, MO so I'll usually plan my trip so I spend the night at "Wild Bill's" truck stop on the southern side of Branson.

There's some good practice on that route for going up and down steep grades, plus they throw in some curves, and plenty of inner-city stop and go stuff too. Good for you - you survived!

If you come back through that same route there's a good BBQ restaurant in McGehee, AR on 65. It's called "Hoots BBQ" the food is good, and they have truck parking. The prices aren't cheap, but fair. You can spend the night in their lot if you need to.

Rick S.'s Comment
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At what point do you decide to pull it in until weather conditions improve.

Not being hyper-critical here - but I've been reading posts recently where relatively new drivers, have been "toughing it out" (continuing to drive in wind warnings, etc.). There's no shame or cowardice in stopping in a safe place in adverse road conditions.

And the concern in some cases, is less for US in large rigs - but the non-pro drivers flying down the road and taking US OUT (or trying to).

If you look at many of the circumstances in "chain reaction incidents", the first vehicle to get struck was usually driving at a safe speed for conditions and got nailed by someone who wasn't (or was overdriving for the hazard).

Again - not a criticism or attack - just an observation. If I've gotta go 25mph in a 60 because of conditions - it's just as productive to pull off for a couple of hours until they improve.

Just sayin...

Rick

Tractor Man's Comment
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If I've gotta go 25mph in a 60 because of conditions - it's just as productive to pull off for a couple of hours until they improve.

True statement. But.............you are not normally starting out in thick fog, (or shouldn't be), but driving into it at some point. You can barely see the road in front of you, let alone exit signs at the last second, so finding a safe place to pull over and wait it out is often out of the question. So crawling through it at 20-25 mph is really your only option until the opportunity arises to make your "escape". Driving into thick fog is a very uncomfortable experience to say the least. What may be a 5 mile stretch of fog, can sometimes seem like an eternity to get out the other side!

Old School's Comment
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But.............you are not normally starting out in thick fog, (or shouldn't be), but driving into it at some point.

This is true, and when you consider where NeeklODN was, it is quite easy to just all of a sudden find yourself in a dense unexpected fog as you cross a low area where there's river, or sometimes a heavy fog will be on one side of a mountain while not on the other. The Ozarks are tricky like that. One of the problems with a route like 65 in Arkansas is that there is very limited places for you to pull off and take a break.

NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

Yep, mountains, dense fog, and dark are a scary combination. Even our eastern "tiny" mountains.

Indeed!

Neek, too bad you couldn't go through there in the daylight, it's a very beautiful scenic drive.

yeah I actually did drive through there for part of the afternoon yesterday. It is extremely beautiful.

You’re not far from me. But I’m ready to get the heck out of here. There is a forecast for some nasty weather today.

It's all blue skies towards Joplin!

NeeklODN, I run 65 often when I'm heading to one of our customers in Springfield, MO. One of my daughters lives in Branson, MO so I'll usually plan my trip so I spend the night at "Wild Bill's" truck stop on the southern side of Branson.

There's some good practice on that route for going up and down steep grades, plus they throw in some curves, and plenty of inner-city stop and go stuff too. Good for you - you survived!

If you come back through that same route there's a good BBQ restaurant in McGehee, AR on 65. It's called "Hoots BBQ" the food is good, and they have truck parking. The prices aren't cheap, but fair. You can spend the night in their lot if you need to.

Yeah, I passed that restaurant. I had a drop off in Springfield MO. It was quite an experience to say the least.

At what point do you decide to pull it in until weather conditions improve.

Not being hyper-critical here - but I've been reading posts recently where relatively new drivers, have been "toughing it out" (continuing to drive in wind warnings, etc.). There's no shame or cowardice in stopping in a safe place in adverse road conditions.

And the concern in some cases, is less for US in large rigs - but the non-pro drivers flying down the road and taking US OUT (or trying to).

If you look at many of the circumstances in "chain reaction incidents", the first vehicle to get struck was usually driving at a safe speed for conditions and got nailed by someone who wasn't (or was overdriving for the hazard).

Again - not a criticism or attack - just an observation. If I've gotta go 25mph in a 60 because of conditions - it's just as productive to pull off for a couple of hours until they improve.

Just sayin...

Rick

Just like tractor man said, when I left, there was actually no fog. And like old-school said, it creeps up on you out of nowhere. Might be a one mile stretch here or two Mile stretch there. Pretty much nowhere to pull over.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Yes, clear one mile, then dip down in elevation near water or any big fields and socked in by the fog. Expect it every day during the warm months.

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