Does Roehl Charge Tuition If You Fail Your CDL Exam?

Topic 25766 | Page 9

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Craig L.'s Comment
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Damn, sounds like I am in for a world of pain and learning.

Rubber Duck's Comment
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Hey gtown I sleep at the Clinton Walmart every time I get a load going into like Paterson or that whole area where NJ and new York are sitting on top of each other. The Chinese place on top the hill has good Chinese. It’s the highlight of my day. I could see someone taking out that guardrail one day.

G-Town's Comment
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Hey gtown I sleep at the Clinton Walmart every time I get a load going into like Paterson or that whole area where NJ and new York are sitting on top of each other. The Chinese place on top the hill has good Chinese. It’s the highlight of my day. I could see someone taking out that guardrail one day.

Yeah, tough to tell the difference sometimes.

Cool. I was there about 2 weeks ago. Always a few trucks parked past the dock. It’s always a blindside maneuver on this one, and since it’s a small store, always a trailer in the hole of the 2-bay dock.

When I have time, I’ll upload some satellite views of the “interesting ones”.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Try driving a 275” Peterbuilt with a 48’ stepdeck trailer in and out of cemetaries and funeral home parking lots all day. And don’t even think about touching a blade of grass🤭🤭. That will make you learn real quick. I have photo’s for those that doubt it can be done. Certainly not for a new driver!!!!

Stepdeck:

A stepdeck , also referred to as "dropdeck", is a type of flatbed trailer that has one built in step to the deck to provide the capabilities of loading higher dimensional freight on the lower deck.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

Yeah I guess. But 7k is a bit too steep. My community college charges 3.5k for a 10 week class. That might be the better route.

One guy needed special dispensation to take the WI exam for a 6th and final time. He couldn't get backing even to "test level". My instructor worked with him for a bit, "truck mate" and I gave up time, encouragement, help and support.

He was able to pass backing but couldn't shift at even simulator level. Dunno how he got that far. They were going to put him in the one automated manual the school bought for such purposes. Again, truck mate and I gave up time, etc. (because we had just the two of us... most trucks had 3)....

Suffice it to say... no one gave up and this person was able to get an unrestricted (transmission, anyway) CDL.

NOT DISPUTING THE VALUE OF COMPANY SPONSORED TRAINING B U T EPIC FAILS ARE APPARENTLY A HUGE DOWNSIDE.

$7K DEBT OUT TO COLLECTION, NO CDL?

Tough spot to say the least!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

Craig said that OTR drivers

coming in and out of on/off ramps to drive in the city and pull into stores/docks of they have never visited before

Heres some information for you. Home every night jobs can be 250 miles away from the terminal. Meaning local drivers are constantly going on streets and cities they dont know. Do not assume you will be in the comfort of your own county/area.

I live 100 miles from NYC, 10 miles from Philadelphia, and 100 miles to Baltimore. That means I coukd be in all those places if driving locally. No way to know all the streets or truck routes etc.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Marc Lee wrote:

NOT DISPUTING THE VALUE OF COMPANY SPONSORED TRAINING B U T EPIC FAILS ARE APPARENTLY A HUGE DOWNSIDE.

It’s a downside of any trucking school. Same exact failure of “Epic” proportion can and does occur with Private Schools.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

My thinking exactly G Town.

Personally, I think my company tries really hard. Splitter and I both got additional one on one instruction to help us pass. My FM flat out stated "They wont let someone fail if they can pass the pretrip. They will keep practicing until they know he will pass".

That has been my experience. local schools may do this but then charge extra.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
Damn, sounds like I am in for a world of pain and learning.

Craig, we try our best to give people the best path to success out here. We know OTR is not for everyone. Have you noticed how most local driving jobs want experienced drivers only? There's some very valid reasons for that.

We understand your misconceptions about the industry. We deal with this all the time. There is a small number of folks who get into this and start their careers as local drivers, but by far most of them do OTR driving jobs first. We've seen countless people come through here who insisted on local work, had a minor accident, and got fired. That scenario puts you in a really bad position. Nobody wants to touch you at that point. You don't have what anyone considers as experience, you've got a blemished record, and you're basically blackballed by the industry.

As an OTR driver who is learning the ropes, you are given some discretion. It's a much more forgiving environment than local driving. We've seen drivers with as many as 3 minor accidents keep their jobs and progress into becoming professionals. There are solid reasons why OTR has been the standard for building experience. Here's an article that you might find helpful...

Why You Should Not Start Your Driving Career As A Local Driver

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

My experience with Swift’s Academy was similar to what Rainy described with Prime.

I’ll share one story;

One of my closest friends during school was struggling mightily with shifting. The day before he needed to graduate, the most experienced instructor took him out one-on-one for over 8 hours and vowed they weren’t coming back until he could shift properly. It worked.

He graduated, but failed his first CDL testing attempt. Went back to Richmond for another 3 days of instruction and practice (no additional charge) and passed the CDL test on his second try.

He was on the same Dedicated Walmart Account I’m on for 2 years, went to Toll Brothers and is still working there.

This is an “Epic Success Story” that is typically untold.

Paid CDL Training Programs will work to get it right with any student who projects a positive attitude and work ethic.

Epic fails are usually a culmination of many things. Cannot over emphasize how important it is to consider any company sponsored training like a long job interview.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

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