New Swift Driver Wanting To Switch

Topic 25783 | Page 1

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Ray T.'s Comment
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Hey all, been browsing this site for awhile and decided to train at Swift...finished schooling and mentorship and am in my 2nd week of solo driving. My question is, how do I go about asking to switch to a pure dedicated account where I can get home weekly or every other week?

I'm also considering switching companies, solo driver on a dedicated or regional account where I can get home weekly or every other week. Any input on where to go? Just so frustrated with Swift right now...I just don't know what to do but know that I'm frustrated with the company and my friend is considering leaving too...

Any input would be greatly appreciated!!

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

First off, what made you choose Swift? There is nothing bad about them, just curious.

My question is, how do I go about asking to switch to a pure dedicated account where I can get home weekly or every other week?

I'd take a guess and talk to your dispatcher , although with 2 weeks solo i think it's unlikely. If home time is that important why didn't you get on somewhere that does weekly home time (TMC and McElroy come to mind).

What has made you unhappy with swift? 2 weeks is hardly any time at all to even understand what's going on. Most times you're given low miles and large delivery windows when your new. They're not going to give you super tight schedules or their largest customers until you prove you can achieve the level of service this customers expect. If your friend wants to leave let them, but he'll have a rude awakening if he hits something and the new carrier drops his quickly as they haven't invested in him like swift has. I can't find the thread but a couple weeks or a month ago someone told us they did exactly what you're contemplating. They jumped ship to I believe JB Hunt and JB let them go just before they were set to get a sign on bonus or a CPM increase. Leaving before your obligation is up doesn't show your future employers you're trustworthy in most cases. We have had a few members that Jump ship 6 months in due to sick family members but they have exhausted all options with current employer.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Big T's Comment
member avatar

You would need to find out who is running that fleet and contact them.

Most of our dedicated accounts require three to six months solo before they will take you on. You need to prove yourself first. You need to prove that you can safely deliver on time. Until you prove yourself most won't take you on unless you trained on that account.

If you're frustrated I would advise you to talk to your DM about your concerns. Quitting especially with no experience isn't going to solve your problems and most companies will make you go back through training if you do jump ship.

What are your frustrations with Swift right now? Maybe some of us can help out.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Rubber Duck's Comment
member avatar

You should just call them and tell them you can’t do the over the road gone for weeks on end thing. Let them know how long your willing to stick it out until they can get you on a home weekly account. When that time comes and goes move on. When I was a green horn I would have lost my mind if I didn’t get home on the weekends. Now that my nerves have settled and I’ve adjusted to the lifestyle I could stay out for many months. What stops me and most people from doing that is the family. Without you even telling us why i could bet you my paycheck I know why your disappointed with swift. Thing is them problems will be at every similar trucking job you take. The grass is the same color on the other side. I been there. “You can only control the path your on not the road that takes you there.” The rubber duck.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Eric G.'s Comment
member avatar

I would stick it out with Swift. Prove yourself. Then they should have no problem giving you a dedicated route where you get home more. Remember stay safe and prove yourself. That's always the correct path to success.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

I would stick it out with Swift. Prove yourself. Then they should have no problem giving you a dedicated route where you get home more. Remember stay safe and prove yourself. That's always the correct path to success.

Eric is giving you good advice. Usually when new drivers want to change to another company, the problem is not with the company, Swift in this case, but with the driver. You move to another company and the first thing that goes in your suitcase is your problem that caused your unrest in the first place.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Rubber Duck suggests

You should just call them and tell them you can’t do the over the road gone for weeks on end thing

When I started with Swift, I told my DM I'd appreciate getting home every other weekend. I explained my reason. That works with the one week driving/ one day home deal. That's what I got.

The flip side of that was I pretty much stayed Midwest & South (centered on Memphis) instead of driving all over the USA.

But follow the official Trucking Truth advice and stay with Swift for that first year. Also it's easier to make the tuition payments instead of paying off the whole amount you per.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar
just don't know what to do but know that I'm frustrated with the company and my friend is considering leaving too...

I'm trying not to laugh.......Tractor Man puts on a straight face.

So let me get this straight. Your TOTAL exposure to this industry totals approximately 10- 12 weeks. 3 weeks at the Academy, You obviously passed and got your CDL A. Congratulations, that is a huge accomplishment! It was one of the toughest things I ever did in my life, I was 56 years old at the time and had accomplished some pretty tough stuff. 4-6 weeks with a Mentor. Again congratulations, not an easy task. Obviously, again, you tested out, were assigned a Tractor, and have been Solo for two weeks. I am being serious here. What in the world are you, in your own words, "frustrated with the Company" about? What do you have to compare it with? If it is just a matter of getting home every week or two, that will work itself out. You NEED to get out on the road for AT LEAST 3-4 WEEKS at a stretch for 6 months and begin to learn the job. It takes long days, lots of time, and tons of patience and humility, to even BEGIN to figure it out. I really hope you come back and help us fill in some of the blanks. We are here to help you out

smile.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

⬆️LIKE⬆️

Ray T.'s Comment
member avatar

Sorry for the late response, the company gave me very tight deadlines for my first 2 loads and I was late both times., couldn't help not being late. They gave me an 8 hours window to drive 583 miles...the first load I was late because the tractor I was given was leaning one way, and the frame was twisted. Been sitting at least a third of the time at the moment...

Maybe it is like you've said, I'm still adjusting. They put me in a 2016 Freightliner and my anxiety is skyrocketing because of the safety blitz.

My recruiter gave me wrong information so I was kinda roped into the dedicated account my mentor was on which is Otr one way and dedicated the other way. I really do want to stick it out at least 6 months...please tell me it gets better lol

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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