VERY Choppy Job History.... Where Should I Apply?

Topic 25790 | Page 1

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Greg A.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi,

I have a very choppy job history for a host of reasons (smart ass replies not welcomed). I just finished my cdl in a community college in South Carolina, have a crystal clean driving record, great credit history, and completely clean criminal record.

Are there any companies that would take me? As for local OTR gigs, I'm just not that excited about living with a some dude is a box for 5 &1/2 days a week.

Advise? Thank you...

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi,

I have a very choppy job history for a host of reasons (smart ass replies not welcomed). I just finished my cdl in a community college in South Carolina, have a crystal clean driving record, great credit history, and completely clean criminal record.

Are there any companies that would take me? As for local OTR gigs, I'm just not that excited about living with a some dude is a box for 5 &1/2 days a week.

Advise? Thank you...

Greg, doesn't the community college you attended help their students with job placement? That would be a good thing to pursue.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Army 's Comment
member avatar

I understand about you not wanting to live with a dude in a closet for 5 1/2 days a week. Have you considered solo driving? If I am not mistaken, any company you go with will require some additional training and "driving with a dude or dudette" to make sure you know how they want things done.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

OTR is where you are going to get the most experience. You will experience everything that is necessary to become a successful, productive driver; an asset to an employer. To learn the basics and beyond, any company hiring a brand new CDL holder is going to put them in a truck with a trainer for a minimum of three weeks. Some companies may require much longer, like upwards of six months. Starting off as a local driver is not what we recommend due to the extra challenges, such as heavy traffic, lots of extra backing, hand unloading of freight, and tight areas in urban surroundings.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

I did 4 weeks OTR with a trainer it wasnt that bad yes there are some bad trainers but there are more good ones.

If you truly want to avoid OTR i would suggest applying for a linehaul position at a LTL company such as Old Dominion, Estes, Saia, XPO and R&L to name a few. That way you can get experience driving without so much of the tight quaters maneuvering.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Retired supertrucker's Comment
member avatar

Everyone will take you. For South Carolina though, good jobs are hard to find. I used to live in myrtle beach so I know that drill. The freight sucks there so they pay drivers less than they pay drivers in the steel belt. I did have a pretty sweet gig in Charleston where i pulled dedicated to Louisville and back. If you live over by spartanburg, the opportunities are even better.

Hi,

I have a very choppy job history for a host of reasons (smart ass replies not welcomed). I just finished my cdl in a community college in South Carolina, have a crystal clean driving record, great credit history, and completely clean criminal record.

Are there any companies that would take me? As for local OTR gigs, I'm just not that excited about living with a some dude is a box for 5 &1/2 days a week.

Advise? Thank you...

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Retired supertrucker's Comment
member avatar

Newly minted drivers are actually preferred by big companies because you have a clean DAC and your insurance is cheaper than drivers with experience. Sounds bizarre, but welcome to trucking. Dont let these companies con you into thinking you are worth less than you think. As a new driver, the ball is in your court for that very reason.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Rubber Duck's Comment
member avatar

Does the DAC effect insurance for real.

Newly minted drivers are actually preferred by big companies because you have a clean DAC and your insurance is cheaper than drivers with experience. Sounds bizarre, but welcome to trucking. Dont let these companies con you into thinking you are worth less than you think. As a new driver, the ball is in your court for that very reason.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

It sure does affect it.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar
The freight sucks there so they pay drivers less than they pay drivers in the steel belt

maybe for local. OTR pay is practically the same regardless where you live.

Newly minted drivers are actually preferred by big companies because you have a clean DAC and your insurance is cheaper than drivers with experience. Sounds bizarre, but welcome to trucking. Dont let these companies con you into thinking you are worth less than you think. As a new driver, the ball is in your court for that very reason

I'd love to see the source for this. New drivers take quite some time to become profitable for the company and are more likely to have accidents. I can assure you the ball is NOT in a freshly minted CDL drivers court. If that's the case why are there still many companies that require 2 years of experience? That logic buys into the whole "free agent" myth.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

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