VERY Choppy Job History.... Where Should I Apply?

Topic 25790 | Page 2

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Old School's Comment
member avatar
Newly minted drivers are actually preferred by big companies because you have a clean DAC and your insurance is cheaper than drivers with experience. Sounds bizarre, but welcome to trucking. Dont let these companies con you into thinking you are worth less than you think. As a new driver, the ball is in your court for that very reason.

Okay, I don't know how in the world you came up with this information. But every bit of it is false. You seriously need to take a chill with your advice at this point. You can't just throw stuff out there like this. You need to provide some evidence. And, since there is none to back up what you claim, please do not spew out hearsay as if it were factual.

I'm an experienced driver with a clean DAC. That's where the demand is.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Newly minted drivers are actually preferred by big companies because you have a clean DAC and your insurance is cheaper than drivers with experience. Sounds bizarre, but welcome to trucking. Dont let these companies con you into thinking you are worth less than you think. As a new driver, the ball is in your court for that very reason.

That logic is laughable at best.

Someone with zero experience and no real-world driving skills is going to be more desireable than an experienced driver? Plus the insurance is cheaper, too? rofl-3.gif

Please do share your source of information with the rest of us here.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Greg A.'s Comment
member avatar

Just to clarify I wasn't downing all partner type situations. I understand I'll be paired with a trainer for at least 6 weeks. I was more referring to living with someone OTR for the whole year. That's why the OTR doesn't excite me at all.

My objective was to seek advice on companies that may look past my past, understand this is a new career and my job hopping won't scare them away.

As for local OTR smaller companies, yes I could probably get hired by one (fingers crossed) but again it'd be for the whole year living in a box with some dude... Why a year I say because I'm already smart enough to understand newbies must stay with their 1st company for the entire year to show commitment.

Thank you and good luck to all... especially me....lol

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

Just to clarify I wasn't downing all partner type situations. I understand I'll be paired with a trainer for at least 6 weeks. I was more referring to living with someone OTR for the whole year. That's why the OTR doesn't excite me at all.

My objective was to seek advice on companies that may look past my past, understand this is a new career and my job hopping won't scare them away.

As for local OTR smaller companies, yes I could probably get hired by one (fingers crossed) but again it'd be for the whole year living in a box with some dude... Why a year I say because I'm already smart enough to understand newbies must stay with their 1st company for the entire year to show commitment.

Thank you and good luck to all... especially me....lol

There are not many places that you would have to be with a trainer for a year....I think you are misunderstanding. Some as little as 3 weeks, some as much as 6 months. And you're confusing me when you say "smaller local OTR." OTR and local are two different things...

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Greg, you are confusing OTR and team driving. I am an OTR driver, but there's no "dude" in this box with me. Occasionally my dog rides with me, but for the most part I am alone. There are way more single driver operated trucks out here doing over the road jobs than there are team drivers.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Michael B.'s Comment
member avatar

Greg, the OTR stands for over the road which does not require 2 drivers unless you chose to team drive. As for 2 dudes in a box, during training it will be 2 dudes in a box for 7 days a week not 5 1/2 days a week for the duration of your training. Once your training is complete you upgrade to your own truck, just you in your own box. I chose to drive OTR solo for just that reason, I dont want to share my box. There are some companies that do team driving and some drivers like it because the money is apparantly pretty good but teaming is entirely your choice. As far as the job situation, I think you will be fine as long as you have no long gaps in employment.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Newly minted drivers are actually preferred by big companies because you have a clean DAC and your insurance is cheaper than drivers with experience. Sounds bizarre, but welcome to trucking.

Bizarre? Are you a trained underwriter? That’s like my insurance guy telling me how-to back a truck with nothing more than a SWAG.

No, this is total BS. LMAO!

rofl-3.gif

Stop posting nonsense like this, totally misleads and is not the truth.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Just to clarify I wasn't downing all partner type situations. I understand I'll be paired with a trainer for at least 6 weeks. I was more referring to living with someone OTR for the whole year. That's why the OTR doesn't excite me at all.

My objective was to seek advice on companies that may look past my past, understand this is a new career and my job hopping won't scare them away.

As for local OTR smaller companies, yes I could probably get hired by one (fingers crossed) but again it'd be for the whole year living in a box with some dude... Why a year I say because I'm already smart enough to understand newbies must stay with their 1st company for the entire year to show commitment.

Thank you and good luck to all... especially me....lol

Job-hopping is less an issue (for non-trucking jobs) than being able to document what you were doing for the last 3 years. More along the lines of - "were you in an Al Shabab training camp in Yemen?" during that 3 month gap in employment.

While it is an indicator of stability and maturity - it is just a factor. And for younger folks, in "economically unstable" regions, can be quite common. What is important is VERIFIABLE REFERENCES, whether you left or GOT FIRED, and would you be rehired (legally, employers aren't supposed to dish out specific negative information - just an "eligible for re-hire".

Companies are REQUIRED BY REGULATION to check previous employers - 3 years if you've never driven commercially, 10 years if you have.

What's AS IMPORTANT is a clean criminal record and driving record.

So if your "choppy record" is hopping from Burger King, to McD's, to Wendys, to Taco Bell - it's no big deal, as long as you weren't fired for tapping the register - and you can explain large gaps in employment.

Hard to give more advice, without getting more specifics on your employment history - but unless there's a lot of negative reports from previous employers it shouldn't make a difference.

Now - if you were a driver - and went through 3-4 companies in a year - that would raise some eyebrows.

Rick

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Robsteeler's Comment
member avatar

If you are really good at maneuvering, you should try Schneider. I had trouble, so it was a struggle, but I was out with a trainer for a week. 3 1/2 days in actual time driving with the trainer. It wasn't enough for me, and I had a couple of minor issues in the first couple months. Honestly though, Prime or Schneider will definitely take you with a sketchy job history.

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