A Reminder About Who We Are And What We Do

Topic 25847 | Page 1

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Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I was travelling this past week so I haven't been able to participate as much as I normally do but I have been reading along quite a bit. I have to say that I'm extremely disappointed in the amount of crybabying, hyper-sensitivity, and criticizing I'm hearing from some of you which has been directed at the absolutely fantastic people who are giving the advice here.

The moderators, experienced drivers, and advisors that have been here for a long time are some of the most talented, experienced, dedicated, knowledgeable, and caring people that any of us will ever have the privilege of learning from. They spend the precious little bit of free time they have voluntarily helping people understand this industry so they can avoid the pitfalls and get their careers off to a great start. I have a tremendous amount of respect and appreciation for what they do and I would expect the rest of you to feel the same.

I have promised from day one that we will always give you very direct and honest advice. We will share the hard truth with you, whether you want to hear it or not. In fact, the truth is most valuable to those who are trying hard not to see it. With those types we have to be even more blunt, maybe even a little gruff, because that's what it takes to get through to some people. Even then it doesn't always work, but we're always going to give it our best.

We are the friendliest trucking forum you'll find anywhere, but that doesn't mean we're going to treat people with kid gloves. You're adults. We're going to give you the cold hard truth and we expect you to be able to handle it. No one here has the time to carefully craft each word in the most sensitive and polite way possible. We're going to be direct and straight to the point. We're going to tell it like it is.

If you have a dumb idea we're going to say it's dumb. If you're being arrogant we're going to call you out on it, and maybe even put you in your place - and enjoy doing so. If you're spreading truck stop rumors we're going to make you prove the things you're saying are true. That's how we roll.

Trucking is an incredibly difficult and dangerous profession. Most of the people who take a shot at it fail hard and quickly. Many of those failures are a direct result of following the bad information they've gotten from other sources or believing their own fantasies.

We're going to tell you exactly what you need to know to be successful out there in the real world and we're going to put it to you straight. That's what makes us so friendly. We're looking out for you. It's a rare privilege to get this kind of help from top notch professionals, and they're even doing it for free. You should count your blessings.

Are we going to explain ourselves the same way we would to a 5 year old at a daycare center? Oh hell no. Are we going to tell you exactly what you need to know in no uncertain terms? Oh hell yeah. Every single time.

If you want the God's honest truth and thoughtful, helpful advice from the industries top professionals then you've come to the right place. If that's not enough then please send your requests to:

grow.a.pair@cry-me-a-river.com

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

thank-you-2.gif

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks Brett. Yes, this is why I have been active here for five or so years. I don't waist my time at other driver boards. This is a No BS forum. If your beef is legitimate, we can point you in the right direction. If you have a problem with "them", "drivers", "the government" or your company is screwing you, maybe you don't quite understand how this trucking business works. Imagine the comments we get from a student not even finishing his CDL classes who complains his instructors (with at least three years experience in the driver seat) "aren't teaching me right". You have another thing coming, That's why most of the regulars have some popcorn handy.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

One of the reasons why I'm still here, after a decade.

This is not the "trucking debate society" - and all us, if actually, factually proven wrong, have no problem standing corrected.

There is the combined experience of 100's of years in many facets of the industry, as well as real life experience from all walks of life, and pre-trucking professions.

All for FREE - and all out of the "goodness of our hearts", with nothing offered to us in exchange - except for the satisfaction of helping others and the occasional thank you.

Rick

Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks Brett for making this a fun and exceptional learning experience. Have I come across as arrogant sometimes, maybe so. Have I had bad days as I learn from mistakes, oh hell yes. Have I admitted when I've been proven wrong yes.

As you know I came from mainly a fuel and chemical tanker background. So my learning curve to change directions is sometimes difficult.

What I like best about this site you built is the vast experience level of your moderators here. They have been truthful, knowledgeable and very helpful.

Thanks again for building this site.

Raptor

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Great points Brett, and thank you for this wonderful place to be. For honesty, this is the place to be. For those that don’t want facts and real-life experiences, that’s really unfortunate, and their loss, whether they realize it or not. Facts are facts and I try to provide honest answers, same as everyone that’s a regular on here in my opinion.

It’s the only social media I do in my spare time. Lots of that for the past few months. I don’t Facebook, Twitter, instagram, YouTube, or any other site. This is it! This is only one because it’s the only one worth my time reading and posting.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Craig L.'s Comment
member avatar

One of the reasons why I'm still here, after a decade.

This is not the "trucking debate society" - and all us, if actually, factually proven wrong, have no problem standing corrected.

There is the combined experience of 100's of years in many facets of the industry, as well as real life experience from all walks of life, and pre-trucking professions.

All for FREE - and all out of the "goodness of our hearts", with nothing offered to us in exchange - except for the satisfaction of helping others and the occasional thank you.

Rick

I like the forum. I have learned a lot here and it has been no BS. That is why I have stuck around. Rick, where did you get your CDL from which school/company?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

Great reminder post !! Yes this site has an overwhelming abundance of knowledge, experience and pretty sound advice..... I don't read or even know any other trucking related sites, and really don't need em

dancing-banana.gif

Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

Ooops I forgot to add.......Thanks to the cdl practice tests here I Just finished taking four CDL A written tests and passed ALL of em 1st try!!

good-luck-2.gifdancing-banana.gif

Guy next to me is on his 3 try to pass the air brake test.......That's gotta suck

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Great Steve!dancing-banana.gifdancing-banana.gifdancing-banana.gif

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