How Is It Legal For Company Trucks To Be Governed At Different Speeds?

Topic 25855 | Page 2

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Michael B.'s Comment
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Scott, I have to agree with the answers you have gotten. When I first started driving I had the same sort of "faster is better" mentality although I wouldn't even consider talking to management about it or changing companies over it. What I have learned over time however is that the couple extra mph doesn't make a difference in the long run. Stop stressing on the little things like that or you will alienate yourself from any employer and likely cause yourself a stroke.

PackRat's Comment
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For the OP—do you run Qualcomm , PeopleNet, or ?

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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Could be like Schneider where team drivers and bulk drivers can go 65 but OTR solo can only go 63. Owner operators can go 68 to 70 depending where they the truck.

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That very well could be, or maybe it could be something to do with pedal vs cruise? I can't recall the company but there was a company that allowed 63 on cruise and 65 on the pedal.

Swift and Wolding do

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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As far as legality, it is their truck, they can do whatever they want.

As far as insurance fraud, who knows what the policy says. It may not mention governing at all.

Scott O.'s Comment
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For the OP—do you run Qualcomm , PeopleNet, or ?

Qual.

Actually I do a lot of long hauls coast to coast with light loads. Interstate driving. Dispatch does a good job too, so I’m not even exaggerating when I say I’m against the governor 80% of my on duty time. I run 70hrs per week every week for weeks. Simple math shows that if I were going just 3mph faster during this 80% of my on duty time then I’d be making an extra $268.80 per month. Chump change.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Brett Aquila's Comment
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Simple math shows that if I were going just 3mph faster during this 80% of my on duty time then I’d be making an extra $268.80 per month

No, you wouldn't. You'd still be turning the same number of miles you are now so your pay would be the same as it is now. You're not getting paid by the mile per hour. You're getting paid by the total number of miles you're turning and you wouldn't be turning any more miles even if your truck was turned up to 70 mph.

There is absolutely no chance whatsoever that you would be dispatched for more miles if your truck ran 3 mph faster, or 10 mph faster for that matter. No one is sitting in the office going, "Well, we'll give this 2,900 mile load to the guy running 65 mph and this 2,600 mile load to the guy running 62 mph." No chance whatsoever. Dispatch has no idea how fast you're running, nor do they care. It has no effect on the big picture.

If you're maxed out on miles turning over 3,000 miles per week then it simply doesn't get any better than you have it now. You're looking for an excuse to be upset about something when you already have it made. Be thankful you're in such a great position, kick back, and enjoy having it so good.

Even if you changed companies to go with one that paid more per mile there's no telling how long it might take you to work your way back up to 3,000+ miles per week. It could take months, and you could easily lose thousands of dollars in the process.

One of the keys to happiness in life is to know when you have it good. I hate to say it, but you sound like a typical truck driver. You just like to gripe. You're turning great miles, making great money, and yet all you're talking about it how the company is doing you wrong, they're committing fraud, and you're going to quit and go somewhere else. Give me a break! If someone handed you a bag full of gold you'd complain it's too heavy.

Good grief.

Jeremy's Comment
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I understand where your coming from but ive learned that where im at is perfect for me and i wouldnt wanna go faster granted that is 70 mph so faster than alot but its perfect i can get to orlando florida in 11-10-11 shift while going down 95 i watched another company truck pass me at id guess 80 or so and i thought well aint that some bullcrap then i thought about our driver that was involved in a very very serious accident and said to myself nope not me so i guess the moral of my ramblings is speeding is just unsafe things happen fast everytime you get near a city and its more important to get home safe than to make and extra 70$ a week

Jamie's Comment
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I dont mind going 63 but personally I would love to be able to pass some people who cant keep their speed. Simply because the on guard system can be pretty annoying when someone goes from 65 down to 58, then my truck wants to slow down even more, and it gets annoying when it keeps happening for miles on end. Other then that, I'm fine only being able to do 63.

PackRat's Comment
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Reason I asked about your particular ELD is if there is a section or tab on it for truck engine parameters, it may read what the mph is set at with the speed limiter (not a governor) by your company. They can set it as low, or high, as they feel. They own the truck and you just drive it.

As pointed out, after driving for more than two years, three mph difference MAKES NO DIFFERENCE. It’s 33 miles more in an 11 hour shift, IF EVERYTHING GOES PERFECT, but it never does. I keep highly detailed records on everything for all my commercial driving. Over each month of driving, counting all miles and my time to drive all those miles as OTR , every state plus six Canadian provinces, my lifetime average is 56 mph for nearly a half million miles in just over three years. This includes my own truck as an owner operator with NO speed limiter. I can drive as slow or fast as I choose. I haven’t been on an Interstate yet that I cannot top any hill at under 55 mph, grossing 80,000 lbs. Anything over 50 mph decreases fuel mileage by at least five precedent for each additional mph.

My drawn out point is three mph, five mph, or ten mph makes essentially no difference. I’m sure the company reasoning is safety, maintenance, and fuel mileage, which are all valid points.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar
I can't recall the company but there was a company that allowed 63 on cruise and 65 on the pedal

Swift is 65 on cruise and 63 on the pedal.

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