New Career With A "best Fit" For Me.

Topic 25934 | Page 1

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SuperBee's Comment
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Living the American dream (freedom to make my own choices) and the beans are getting a little thin. After 34 years in a manufacturing environment, they shut the door and moved across country. That was 2 1/2 years ago. My wife and I started a business that's needing some financial input. Here's where trucking comes in. The main reason I thought I was a big enough old boy to pull it off was I used to work on Cat engines in trucks back in the late 70's. I got my cdl by studying Texas dmv handbook, taking the test, then renting a truck in Dallas. Since then I've added all the endorsements. If your keeping up, no experience. Now for a job. We are keeping the business, so I need to have some time at home to do what I need to do. Looking around, I found that Roehl offers some home time that would really fit what I need. Any thoughts on what I can expect in a realistic world? Home for me is half way between Texarkana, TX and Shreveport, LA. Other info of interest, my wife has family in the Oklahoma City area. I understand Freymiller is there. I don't see any info here about them. I have looked around for a good forum to pick up well grounded information and this forum looked to be the best. Thanks in advance for what you have to offer.

SuperBee

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hello Superbee, and welcome aboard!

I like to shoot straight. So here it goes.

First off, your CDL means very little to any company hiring inexperienced drivers. You need a 160 hour training certificate to go along with that new license. I don't think Roehl, or most other reputable companies will hire you without that. They will require you to go through their training program to obtain that certificate. You tried to take a short-cut, but it wasn't a good choice.

Second, you made this telling remark...

My wife and I started a business that's needing some financial input.

I've been a long time business owner. I know exactly what that means. It means you're not making it, but you're too bull-headed to give it up. So now you want to take on a second job to try to have some cash flow. Bad idea!

Here's two things I want you to consider...

Trucking is not a good option for a part time job. It's very demanding. It's long hours. It's all consuming.

Trucking is best approached with real and genuine Commitment. It's best to be "all in." There's very little room in this career for those who are just trying to raise a little extra money. Those folks never make it in my experience.

I think you'd be way better off making a commitment to trucking and forget about that struggling business. That's how I see it. I know you wanted something else, but I'd really like to see you succeed. Take it for what it's worth. Do with it what you will. But, mark my word, you're gonna find out I know what I'm talking about on this one.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

SuperBee's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Old School,

Shooting straight serves more good than anything else. Facts are facts however uncomfortable.

I went into the DIY licensing without a full view of the value. Once I had plastic in hand, I began to see what you described. (Trucking companies don't hire truck drivers. Insurance companies do!) Which leads me to being open to training from a truck line.

So I'm looking for my next step. And, thanks again Old School. When you said you wanted to see me succeed, I think you meant it. Just never heard that all those years in the factory.

SuperBee

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

Superbee, I agree with Old Schools advice, but, where there's a will there's a way. OTR Trucking may not be the right direction to be looking. You may want to consider some local Class B options. Ready Mix concrete trucks, Trash Hauling, Roll Off dumpsters, Hydro Vac services. Some of those types of operations are willing to train people who obtained their CDL in the same fashion as you. It would be worth some phone calls and leg work on your part. In certain parts of the Country, some of those positions are known to pay fairly decent, and you'll be home every day. Good luck!

smile.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
SuperBee's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Tractor Man.

Keep 'em coming. Like Ross Perot said "I"m all ears". Lol. And, no I didn't vote for him. He's a good guy though

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Everything Old School and Tractor Man said is true and you can take it to the bank. OTR trucking is a very time consuming job. This past winter I had two home times consisting of a total 3.5 days and when I was home I was only able to do 2 things: Plow snow and sleep. Of course, you don't have to worry about snow, but you get the point.

If you and the wife have a business, you need to be sure she can run it without you because if you go OTR, you won't have the time or energy to help her. Or do what TM suggested, get a local job. I know several dump truck drivers who do quite well and work a fairly normal schedule.

BTW, what is the business you started?

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Starting to be a driver to prop up a failing business will not work. The opportunity to make really good money out here driving is real, but I would rethink your long term solution for that business that’s struggling. As above, this is a full time commitment, not a job. You’re either all in or you might as well stay home and not waste your time, because there is NO in between.

We’re glad you’re here asking these questions now, SuperBee. good-luck.gif

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Roehl has a terminal in the dallas area. They have several hometime options. You would go otr for a period of time then transfer to the 7/7 or 14/7 fleet. You would be slip seating a truck and you would have to commute from home to the terminal. Remember pay is based on miles. More miles=more money. Less miles=less money.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Jrod's Comment
member avatar

Great Thread! Should be Starred -

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks Tractor Man.

Keep 'em coming. Like Ross Perot said "I"m all ears". Lol. And, no I didn't vote for him. He's a good guy though

Voted for him. Highest total votes of any 3rd party candidate to date. Often wonder how different things would be today had he gotten in. He was a little nuts though (but I like crazy).

Rick

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