Advice Please - Started Solo And Second Time This Is Happening.

Topic 26001 | Page 5

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Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Yeah, Big Sxott said all that already

The trailer is backed to the dock and not going anywhere. It's either locked to the dock and/or chocked already

He asked you to clarify only because the way it read was as if you were saying to chock the tractor. It looked that way to me as well. Anyone who is out here on a daily basis chocks the trailer at every dock unless the DOT grab bar locks are in place. And some customers require it then as well.

Many customers won't load you and some make you sign a paper saying you are chocked, tandems slid to the back. Some customers remove the air line themselevs and put a lock on it so you can't move. One had me sit in a break room the whole time.

Nonetheless, all chock trailers. And unless it is a very light load, most want the tandems slid to the back as well. It is better for the pressure on the king pin and 5th wheel too. But i have had customers tell me "its only a couple pallets don't bother".

One customer even made me sign a paper giving them permission to move the trailer to another door or re-align it if need be.

You absorb so much information, I would love to see how.much you would learn if you ever get out OTR. I think you would find it fascinating seeing all the intricacies first hand.

Come on Rick.. join us!!!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

Warehouses I've worked for would only ask for the keys if it was a box truck. Tractors would have to be separate from the trailer in order for them to unload. They would use a dock lock or chock. I've never heard that they both have to be used. If a chock was used because the dock lock wasn't working or didn't fit, they would put a lock around the kingpin or the trailers gladhands.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Rick was 100% correct with everything he said. He was simply saying you should chock your trailer tires at the dock, and he's correct of course. He also went on to say more that was also 100% correct:

From what I hear - there are companies that actually REQUIRE the drivers to disconnect from the trailer while in the dock, and those also require the wheels to be chocked (trailer wheels obviously). Heard stories of some places asking drivers for their keys, etc. - all to ensure the trailer doesn't get moved.

While we would hope that everyones's brakes are good and properly adjusted - it only takes one time for a trailer to move. Some docks have locking devices that lock to the trailer.

So if you're going to take the time to disconnect from the box and pull forward - would it hurt to also chock the wheels. Ultimately - if the box moves for ANY REASON - the DRIVER is going to be responsible for it.

All of that is 100% correct. As always, Rick knows what he's talking about.

Anyone who is out here on a daily basis chocks the trailer at every dock

Then where did all of those videos come from that Rick pointed out showing accidents at the dock?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar
Many customers won't load you and some make you sign a paper saying you are chocked, tandems slid to the back. Some customers remove the air line themselevs and put a lock on it so you can't move. One had me sit in a break room the whole time.

With the ones that make you wait inside, are they atleast pretty quick? I would be a little upset if I was forced to stay inside for several hours (or 20 hrs at meat places!)

Almost all the backhauls I pick up in Iowa and Minnesota have signs stating it's an OSHA requirement that all trailers be chocked. Have a few that have us remove red airline then they place a lock on trailer, 1 makes us wait inside on the dock with them and 3 make us unhook and go to far end of property with the tractor until we're called, after chocking.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
With the ones that make you wait inside, are they at least pretty quick? I would be a little upset if I was forced to stay inside for several hours (or 20 hrs at meat places!)

Reasonably quick at least. They're not going to make you sit in there for many hours, and I'm sure they'd let you return to your truck if you needed to for some reason.

It is rather annoying to have to turn in your keys and sit inside like a child in detention. There are a lot of ways to ensure the driver doesn't pull away from the dock without taking their keys and imprisoning them. Some places really go to the max, though.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Longest I’ve had to sit inside (dry van) was under three hours while it was loaded or unloaded. Usually, we just sit in the truck. Some places have odd requirements, though.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

I always thought it was somewhat silly to have to turn in your keys. Most drivers have two keys in the cab anyway or at least a hide out key. It would really be irritating to be asked: "Is this your only key? We need ALL your keys and your hide out key also. And do you have more than one hide out key? C'mon cough 'em up!"

But I never minded disconnecting, moving the tractor, disconnecting the air line or chocking the wheels. It's a sound safety practice. Having to wait in the cage (holding cell) could be a trial because sometimes they don't even have a chair in those. Duh.

confused.gifwtf.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Ginger Twist's Comment
member avatar

Rainy you mentioned looking at the reviews for shippers/receivers. Where do you find those? Also, does anyone dealing with Tyson (window appointments ex: 12:01 - 24:59) wait till the end of the time window to pick up (23:00 - 24:00) Have found they notoriously don’t have the product to load until the deadline at the end of the window. Clocks always running out when get there at beginning of window time and have to sit, running out the 14 hr clock. Do you call ahead and ask? We have, been told load is ready only to start the clock, get there and told nope not ready. 🤷🏻‍♀️

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Rainy you mentioned looking at the reviews for shippers/receivers. Where do you find those? Also, does anyone dealing with Tyson (window appointments ex: 12:01 - 24:59) wait till the end of the time window to pick up (23:00 - 24:00) Have found they notoriously don’t have the product to load until the deadline at the end of the window. Clocks always running out when get there at beginning of window time and have to sit, running out the 14 hr clock. Do you call ahead and ask? We have, been told load is ready only to start the clock, get there and told nope not ready. 🤷🏻‍♀️

Reviews are on Google

Tyson Cargill, JBS, National Beef.... almost all meat plants will make you wait. There are different kinds of plants.... some are slaughterhouses, some processing, and some packaging. The wait times differ based on the type... and with time, you will learn which are which. Also, the trailer may be loaded, but USDA didnt inspect it and produce paperwork for it. That is probably why you were told it was ready but security couldnt release it to you.

Slaughterhouses often do not start killing the "product" until you check in, so waiting until the last minute only hurts you.

If i can drop the trailer and bobtail out and shower, do laundry and sleep that is great. If not , I would just stock the truck with food before going in and take my 8 or 10 hour break at the customer. The 8 sleeper will pause the 14 clock, so you will get back whatever you went in with.

After my 2nd year, I stopped getting meat loads I had to wait for. I only get them if i need a 34 now. However, i get ones that weren't picked up earlier due to a truck break down or driver issues. So someone else may have had 36 to 48 hours to drive 800 miles, I am given 24 hours and the delivery appointment is not extended. I have mastered my time management, so if i tell them it cant be done.. it cant be done. Otherwise i figure out a way, even if i have to 8/2 split it all the way there to reduce 30 min breaks and extra fuel stops.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

Also, the trailer may be loaded, but USDA didnt inspect it and produce paperwork for it. That is probably why you were told it was ready but security couldnt release it to you.

Aha! That explains what may have happened recently at a Tyson in Pine Bluff, AR. I was there at 21:30 for a 00:01 pick up. They told me to come back at 08:00 the next morning. I was in a door at 10:00 and loaded before noon. They then told me I would probably have to wait until 17:00 until paperwork was ready. I was confused and more than a little annoyed because I was delivering near San Diego and i wanted to get rolling. I called Shipping at 18:00 for an update. They said, "a couple more hours". Finally at 23:45 a yard driver came and beeped outside my truck and told me my paperwork was ready. I couldn't imagine what the heck was taking so long. Maybe it was an inspection delay?

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